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Samples of the new curriculum in the PI


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rainymike

Here's a sample of the changes being implemented in nitty gritty detail. Some of the changes I like very much. Some less so.

 

For math K-12:

 

http://www.gov.ph/downloads/2012/01jan/MATHEMATICS-K-12-Curriculum-Guide.pdf

 

Very detailed for english K-12 (need to download)

 

http://lrmds.deped.gov.ph/detail/5449

 

Extremely detailed curriculum for Grade 1 language

 

http://www-01.sil.org/asia/philippines/lit/curriculum_guide_for_mtbmle.pdf

Edited by rainymike
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This is great reading material, if you are having a hard time going to sleep.  :cool:

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Scotsbloke

Interesting stuff, Rainymike.  I had a look through the English and Maths curricula as my kids are currently in years 8, 9 and 11 in England (equates to grades 7, 8 and 10 i think).

 

My take is that, certainly in maths, the two are broadly comparable.  The English curriculum is rather different.  'Over here' we place less emphasis on formal grammar and syntax and much more on literature and comprehension.  Obviously this is understandable.  I was surprised, though, at the emphasis given to 'performing' English such as jazz raps, poetry recitation and public speaking.  I was at a school review with my 16 year old last week and, looking through what they do in English, it was almost entirely about understanding texts, identifying key points and constructing their own analysis.  Extra kudos was given to students who show a richness of vocabulary and the hint of originality of thought.

 

School success, though, is little to do with the national curriculum but of how it is implemented locally.  How do schools take these guidelines and transform them in to action for each school term?  How do they formulate lesson plans for each segment and how skilled are the teachers at delivering lesson plans and of evaluating their efficacy?

 

If I were Minister of Education 'over there' I think this would occupy my thoughts more than how some academic can structure a national curriculum.

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rainymike

 

 

School success, though, is little to do with the national curriculum but of how it is implemented locally.  How do schools take these guidelines and transform them in to action for each school term?  How do they formulate lesson plans for each segment and how skilled are the teachers at delivering lesson plans and of evaluating their efficacy?

 

I agree. The curriculum is still new. Implementation seems a bit rough and varies from school to school. That's why the big push for testing. But that opens a different can of worms. My guess is that over the next decade, things will have time to sort itself out. We'll see whether it can stand the test of time or not. Still, it is a step forward for the country in my opinion. In some respects the curriculum will add pressure to the government to improve funding for education.

 

Exploring their curriculum is useful. Gives parents an insight into what the school is trying to do. But I do agree with the post that says it is boring reading.

 

Tell you a secret though. Stateside, when I was in education, I fought battles with the faculty for over a decade to move the campus towards competency based education. From my point of view, it was more about holding faculty accountable for what they were or were not doing in the classroom. Once we had the curriculum in place, the school was not doing any better or worse with respect to educating the masses. But it was easier to kick out the deadbeat teachers than before.

 

When I retired, my view was that setting firm standards in place probably helped improve education by removing the weak faculty. But on the other hand, it hurt education by holding the best faculty back from doing what they did best by being overly prescriptive. It will be very interesting to see how it plays out in the Phils.

 

It is probably a phase the country has to go through before it can rise to the next level though.

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Yeah I glanced at the math, and it looks fairly comparable to here (US). Implementation on the other hand....

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Scotsbloke

When I retired, my view was that setting firm standards in place probably helped improve education by removing the weak faculty. But on the other hand, it hurt education by holding the best faculty back from doing what they did best by being overly prescriptive.

This is the crux.  A rigid implementation regime has he advantage of raising the average but faces the dilemma of hamstringing the (few) inspirational teachers.  There's also the tricky issue of caliber of student.  My three kids go to state schools.  My son goes to a boys' grammar school where the teaching challenge is focused on driving a gifted set of students beyond excellence.  My girls go to a comprehensive school (non selective) which has a different set of challenges.  In both cases, though, I have been thoroughly impressed by the capability of the teachers.

 

This isn't a universally held view 'over here' where our education can range from impressive to dire.

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hookedtothenet

The first one posted is dated 2012. The third is dated 2010.    Is this the latest ?

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rainymike

The first one posted is dated 2012. The third is dated 2010.    Is this the latest ?

 

Not sure. It is what I could find from searching. Posted it because others were complaining that they couldn't find copies of the curriculum.

 

Since I have a kid in grade 1 now, the K and grade 1 curricula does seem on target. But it's just a useful guide. Different schools will mix things up a bit - adding this or emphasizing that on top of the core.

Edited by rainymike
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SkyMan

 

 

The Math is titled K-12 but only covers 1-10.  Much of what is listed as grade 1 should known before or at least in Kindergarten.  The grade 10 stuff looked like grade 8 at most.

 

My only experience with education here is my wife's college classes.  When she told me she was taking Algebra I knew there would be trouble galore.  I spent many long hours helping her through it and I was proud of her working hard and she passed but I don't think she'd have passed my 9th grade Algebra class.  Throughout the semester I kept asking myself they why were teaching the things they were.  For example there are very few special case factoring situations taught to me.  Off hand the only one I remember is the difference of two squares.  She had to memorize that and the sum of squares and difference and sums of cubes and others.  Well you can memorize all these special cases and forgot them 2 seconds after you walk out of the final but what to do when you have something that doesn't fit your special cases?  The quadratic equation right? And since that pretty much always works, why bother with special cases?  They never covered the quadratic equation.  Most absurd, they never covered why one would want to factor anyway.  They never covered that the factors are the solutions to the equation.  But they just taught this math manipulation with no concern at all to why they were learning it.

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rainymike

 

 

But they just taught this math manipulation with no concern at all to why they were learning it.

 

My experience stateside as a student was just that for math. A lot of very weird stuff that one just memorized. In real life, my actual needs for math rarely extended beyond really basic algebra.

 

As for college or any school in the Phils for that matter, it can be a crap shoot. I assume that's one of the reasons for the move towards a more standardized curriculum and testing. There are in my opinion, some good private and public schools with a solid track record. There are probably more schools with a poor track record that need to be monitored by the government. If sending kids to school here, you need to do some careful evaluation of the school.

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Headshot

At the school where my daughter goes, they went to a trimester system this school year. What that means is that instead of having two mid-terms and two final exams (as in a semester system), they have THREE mid-terms and THREE final exams. Unfortunately, they still have all of their teacher days and special activities (which usually involve choreographed performances by the students) where no teaching is done...and then they also use the week before each special activity to practice for their performances where again no teaching is done.

 

In other words, there are more tests and just as many special activities, so the result is less actual teaching days. Because of that, there is material on the exams (which are set in stone) that has NOT been taught in the classroom. What is the result of this? Parents can either assume the role of classroom teacher or watch their child fail. In a normal teacher/parent relationship that I am used to in the US, the teacher teaches (introduces) the material to the students and the parents reinforce that by assisting, reviewing and challenging their child to fully learn each concept. Most parents are NOT qualified, or even have time, to take over the teacher's role in teaching (introducing) the required concepts.

 

In addition, the parents don't even know until days before each exam what material will be covered. Then, parents must figure out what has and hasn't been taught and fill in the gaps (in addition to reviewing material that was taught). My wife is a certified elementary teacher and I have multiple degrees, so it isn't that we aren't qualified to teach any material that my daughter needs to know (in Nursery Level), but it makes me wonder why we are paying the high tuition to the school.

 

We went to SHS Ateneo de Cebu today, and enrolled our daughter for next school year. We already know what their curriculum is (they are very open about their curriculum), and they seem to be more transparent than the school where our daughter went this year. Hopefully, we will come away from next school year feeling like we got our money's worth, rather than feeling like we home-schooled our daughter using the school as a testing center and social skills center.

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rainymike
We went to SHS Ateneo de Cebu today, and signed enrolled our daughter for next school year. We already know what their curriculum is (they are very open about their curriculum), and they seem to be more transparent than the school where our daughter went this year. Hopefully, we will come away from next school year feeling like we got our money's worth, rather than feeling like we home-schooled our daughter using the school as a testing center and social skills center.

 

Our daughter attended a nursery school and I felt comfortable with their teaching methods, but they don't do K-12. They do tutor a lot of kids from the better schools though. We send our youngest boy to their tutors regularly since he was having difficulties keeping up with the changes in the curriculum at his school. The school only accepts students from a handful of private schools for tutoring. Their advice to us was that XXX was the only one still using a more student learning approach to teaching. So, we are now also planning to enroll our youngest there for the next school year. 

 

The boys will continue at their current school. Cost factors play a role in that decision. Despite the issues we had with the school this year, the two boys are now doing fine. My partner has her social network there and that's an important part of our reasonoing as well. In any event, we're not the only parents who have expressed their concerns with instruction (or the insufficiency thereof). Sad thing is the teachers aren't that bad. In previous years, we were quite happy with them. But this year seems a mad turn around with the emphasis on testing.

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rainymike

And what school was XXX?

 

LOL ... well originally I had written the name in, but edited it out. More for security reasons than any other. But maybe that's too paranoid on my part. Perhaps better safe than sorry though. Let's just say that it represents a branch of the Church that has a decent tradition with education, sciences and social justice.

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