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7th grade weekend homework


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rainymike

 

 

One of our close friends is a teacher here, Masters degree and extremely smart, she cant get a job as a public school teacher because she cant afford to pay the director the 50k bonus to get hired in the public school system....so she works in a private school making half of what a govt teacher does.  Here thats a difference of 10k per month.  Public 20k  Private 10k
I think people need to remember that education is a business. In developed countries with decent public school systems schools are supported through taxes of one type or another.

 

It's true in Davao as well. Our first year at our current private school was a good one. But it appears that the best teachers are jumping ship to get into a public school. It's not only a higher salary, but solid benefits as well (from what I understand). 

 

Bottom line for the privates, if they want to offer higher wages, they usually up the tuition and/or increase class sizes. Schools must also conform to some curricular standards (which I don't believe have really been thought through). The standards aren't bad, but seem to be increasingly assessment based. With larger classes and more testing, something has to give. Unfortunately, it seems teaching time is being sacrificed. At least this is what I'm observing at our current school. Not to mention an entire week being sacrificed for fund raising. And yeah, the kids whose parents make significant contributions do seem to get better class rankings from some mysterious extra credit given. My partner has noticed this and will complain to the principal. Unfortunately I don't think it will change anything. The economic fundamentals are working against educational quality.

 

Having said that, I think parents have to decide to focus on what they believe to be the fundamentals. I'm less concerned about grades that the ability of my kids to read/think logically and critically. Just my opinion as an educator of 30 years or so. Most schools don't do that well anyway. Parents, community, the kids themselves have to step up to the plate to make a difference. 

 

Don't mean to sound cynical, but my observations of the best and brightest students/employees usually has been that they were successful in spite of their education. The Philippines might be an extreme case, but I've seen more than my share of 18 year olds back home who were the products of educational systems that left them without the ability to do basic math, read, write, think, and do stuff, etc.

 

So if the teachers are lazy, corrupt, or whatever - you need to learn to do an end run around them. Schools are okay for a diploma but the real educational bread and butter can and maybe should be developed someplace else in the first place.

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throttleplate

stupid is as stupid does.

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bkkmarlowe

What about home schooling? Teaching your child at home, totally and completely. Maybe worth considering if you have the time available and say just one or two kids to manage. There are various home schooling websites and forums with all sorts of help and education materials available.

And maybe hire a tutor to teach those difficult subjects to your child at your residence. Plus you may be able to purchase and download a curriculum package from your home country... that will prepare your child for the college entrance exam back in your home country.

Home schooling means you can be flexible with your kid's study timetable, you can give your child the education and life skills that you want him to have ...and you can travel together anywhere anytime, as long as you have an internet connection. The down side, some folks say, is the lack of social interaction that the student would normally have with his classmates.

What do you parents think? Have you considered home schooling? It may be the best way to go...

 

.

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colemanlee

 

 

Don't mean to sound cynical, but my observations of the best and brightest students/employees usually has been that they were successful in spite of their education. The Philippines might be an extreme case, but I've seen more than my share of 18 year olds back home who were the products of educational systems that left them without the ability to do basic math, read, write, think, and do stuff, etc.

 

You hit the nail on the head....yes, a diploma is important in your resume but without the ability's you mention its all for naught.   I worked for DOD for 15years after I retired from the Marines and was amazed at engineers, management that could not write a simple paragraph or put in context a simple order.

 

I will put this link here, for my money this guy has it nailed on teaching, and giving your child the opportunity to learn...I try my best to use this as a guideline for raising my children as I grew up in one of those more restrictive environments that he describes...

 

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After Yolanda, before the school my youngest attend opened reopened...the parents, not the teachers, spent weeks cleaning the school, removing mud, trash, making small repairs, then NGO's did the major things like roofs and paint....in the high school, the students did the painting and refinishing of furniture etc....then the NGO's again did the major repair.....I never saw once, not once any Philippine govt. help.....but when the schools reopened you bet all the politicians were there with their smiling faces to take credit....

 

One of our close friends is a teacher here, Masters degree and extremely smart, she cant get a job as a public school teacher because she cant afford to pay the director the 50k bonus to get hired in the public school system....so she works in a private school making half of what a govt teacher does.  Here thats a difference of 10k per month.  Public 20k  Private 10k

 

Steve recommended going to the board and complaining about the curriculum and the quality of teachers...Im afraid that would not work here, not because of nationalism but because the teachers working in the public schools have already paid for their jobs....Im not sure if that happens everywhere as I have no first hand knowledge of anywhere but here in Tacloban, Hopefully some of you that have wifes or friends that are teachers in other places can say what is done elsewhere....

 

It is true in our area that teachers who cannot get a public DEPED job, will take a private school job at much less salary. As soon as they can get on in DEPED they quit.

 

The cost in our area was around 40,000 pesos and that was five years ago. It was almost funny how the bribe got paid. The head teacher knew the teacher was related to a foreigner, so she demanded the bribe in dollars. She also said in one day it had to be delivered. That was because the head teacher was taking a trip to Singapore and wanted dollars for travel.

 

There are some advantages to having the DEPED job as this opens up access to federal loan programs as well as retirement plans. Many of the teachers in our area took advantage of some low interest loans after Yolanda hit. They didn't need to show they had suffered any loss. Just apply and the loan is yours.

 

Some of the drawbacks have already been mentioned such as performing maintenance of classrooms at their personal cost.

 

Even bureaucratic stuff can be costly. When my sister in law took her job, it was four or five months before she was able to get a salary. They had her jump though all sorts of hoops to fill out forms and get bank forms signed etc. she had to make three trips to tacloban just to sign forms. This is from the other side of leyte. Go, sign form, come back. Never occurred to anyone that the head teacher could have documents signed at the school and bring them during his frequent trips to tacloban. I guess no one can be trusted. As well, clerks rule!!

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What about home schooling? Teaching your child at home, totally and completely. Maybe worth considering if you have the time available and say just one or two kids to manage. There are various home schooling websites and forums with all sorts of help and education materials available.

And maybe hire a tutor to teach those difficult subjects to your child at your residence. Plus you may be able to purchase and download a curriculum package from your home country... that will prepare your child for the college entrance exam back in your home country.

Home schooling means you can be flexible with your kid's study timetable, you can give your child the education and life skills that you want him to have ...and you can travel together anywhere anytime, as long as you have an internet connection. The down side, some folks say, is the lack of social interaction that the student would normally have with his classmates.

What do you parents think? Have you considered home schooling? It may be the best way to go...

 

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Doesn't interest me. As well, I have doubts it is a well accepted practice in the Philippines.

 

I beleive there is a significant benefit to having the social interaction that schools provide. In spite of the academic problems, my children are learning to my satisfaction.

 

Hiring tutors is problematic. Tutors are a product of the same educational system and there's no assurance they will do any better than the school does.

 

Not sure why an entrance exam for a home country would be of any benefit.

 

In fact, here there are multiple college entrance exams. I am in Cebu today so my child can take an entrance exam for a school tomorrow. Early February, another exam, different school. Already has taken two exams for two other schools. Four exams so far and more if necessary.

 

Even to get into the high school for our kids there was an entrance exam.

 

There may be members if LinC who have used homeschooling, but for me it is not suitable.

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bahalina buong

It is true in our area that teachers who cannot get a public DEPED job, will take a private school job at much less salary. As soon as they can get on in DEPED they quit.

 

The cost in our area was around 40,000 pesos and that was five years ago. It was almost funny how the bribe got paid. The head teacher knew the teacher was related to a foreigner, so she demanded the bribe in dollars. She also said in one day it had to be delivered. That was because the head teacher was taking a trip to Singapore and wanted dollars for travel.

 

 

 

I know plenty of DepEd teachers here in Leyte (including my wife) and none of them have had to pay a bribe, and most of them surely couldn't afford it.  The problem with new hire DepEd teachers is that they typically send them to the far-flung regions for a year or longer while they establish some seniority and apply for permanent local positions.  I think this bribe is to circumvent that process and get a preferred local assignment immediately.  Now,THAT is very common, from what I've seen first hand.        

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Headshot

I want to share a small story that may explain a lot about the way the schools are. My daughter does very well in school, learning quickly and adapts to the social life of the students. She had a group of friends and all was great. However, as the year progresses (sixth grade) she started to excel even more than before. Good news right? Not in the view of some of her classmates. Some stopped being friends and announced why. They didn't like it that she was out-performing the others. She was now getting higher grades, so they resented it. I don't believe this is something the students came up with. I'm convinced it is the obsession among some to always be number one, even if that involved cheating or intimidating others. I think the students learned from their parents this resentment.

 

You are witnessing "crab mentality" at it's finest. My wife  stays in a cabana-like structure on the campus while our daughter is in school along with a bunch of other parents and yayas. There are always conversations in the waiting shed about how the school doesn't teach and how mysterious (unexplainable and opaque) their grading system is. Last month my wife mentioned to the other parents that next school year our daughter will be attending SHS Ateneo de Cebu. It is amazing how the same parents who continually complain about how bad this school is are now trying to talk my wife out of pulling our daughter out at the end of the school year. Of course, they try to make Ateneo look bad (even though they have had no experience with it), while the reality is that they can't afford the tuition at Ateneo but would transfer their own children if they could.

 

have some sympathy for the schools that struggle to hire fully qualified teachers in a country that routinely loses it's best and brightest to so many other countries around the world.

 

There is a glut of teachers here. Qualified? By what standard? If you use teacher certification as a standard, there is no shortage. If you use actual knowledge of how to teach the subject matter...well, that's a different story. It took my wife two years after she passed the certification exam to get an "item" (contract) with DepEd. Until then, she taught at private schools. Filipina teachers are, for the most part, NOT marketable overseas (certainly not in Western countries). That isn't to say that a few don't get hired overseas, but that isn't an option for the vast majority. Where they DO go is to call centers...because many teacher graduates are quite fluent in English (at least the Filipino dialect of English).

 

Another example is classroom improvement.  One time, there was going to be a big evaluation of the school infrastructure in the coming year, so the principal decided all the classrooms needed to be repainted and have tile floors installed.  Of course, no money in the school budget for that, so guess who has to pay for the materials and installation of tiles in their classrooms?

 

What most people don't realize is that the public schools DO have budgets for these kinds of things, but the principals and district administrators divert the money to their own pockets or their own pet projects (like a new laptop to take home at night). It was one of the things that drove me crazy in the time I was dating my wife. They would "inspect" her classroom and tell her all of the classroom "features" that were required, but they never provided any money for anything. If she didn't want to get marked down, she had to provide everything. And...if they weren't provided, she would receive a low ranking, which could affect her pay and her future opportunities.

 

When she got her classroom, it had unpainted plaster walls and ceiling, a door with a broken lock, wooden louver window openings, a small teacher's desk, student desks and a blackboard. Everything else she had to provide. The walls and ceiling had no paint, so she painted them. The window openings had no mosquito screens, so she put screens up to prevent her students from getting dengue. The openings in the wooden louvers were so big, everything going on outside her classroom distracted her students, so she made and installed curtains. She installed a fire extinguisher, a water dispenser, all classroom decorations and learning aids and numerous things that were required but were never used.

 

One of our close friends is a teacher here, Masters degree and extremely smart, she cant get a job as a public school teacher because she cant afford to pay the director the 50k bonus to get hired in the public school system....so she works in a private school making half of what a govt teacher does.  Here thats a difference of 10k per month.  Public 20k  Private 10k

 

Steve recommended going to the board and complaining about the curriculum and the quality of teachers...Im afraid that would not work here, not because of nationalism but because the teachers working in the public schools have already paid for their jobs....Im not sure if that happens everywhere as I have no first hand knowledge of anywhere but here in Tacloban, Hopefully some of you that have wifes or friends that are teachers in other places can say what is done elsewhere.... 

 

My wife was a public school teacher, and we have many friends who are public school teachers. I have never heard of such a thing. If that is indeed the case, she should pay the Ombudsman a visit. I have never heard of a teacher being hired by DepEd using any criteria other than class ranking and certification...certainly never a bribe (of any kind) being asked. I'm not saying it didn't happen, but I've never heard of anything like that. Public school teachers are hired by the DepEd Administrators...NOT the school principals. That way, the administrator can later transfer them between schools. It is rare that a teacher finishes her career in the same school where she starts teaching. My wife started at Tabunan Elementary up near the base of Mt. Manunggal and then transferred to Banawa Elementary. It's all part of the same district.

 

BTW, regular public school teachers make in excess of 23,000 pesos a month. There is no salary scale for private schools, but teacher salary is not based on class size or tuition alone. Some schools are run solely for profit.

 

Correction: after talking with my wife, she said a large part of getting ranked highly for contract consideration is who your connections are...but she doesn't know anybody who actually had to pay a bribe to get their contract. So...nepotism and cronyism yes...but actual bribery no.

 

I think people need to remember that education is a business. In developed countries with decent public school systems schools are supported through taxes of one type or another.

 

It's true in Davao as well. Our first year at our current private school was a good one. But it appears that the best teachers are jumping ship to get into a public school. It's not only a higher salary, but solid benefits as well (from what I understand). 

 

Bottom line for the privates, if they want to offer higher wages, they usually up the tuition and/or increase class sizes. Schools must also conform to some curricular standards (which I don't believe have really been thought through). The standards aren't bad, but seem to be increasingly assessment based. With larger classes and more testing, something has to give. Unfortunately, it seems teaching time is being sacrificed. At least this is what I'm observing at our current school. Not to mention an entire week being sacrificed for fund raising. And yeah, the kids whose parents make significant contributions do seem to get better class rankings from some mysterious extra credit given. My partner has noticed this and will complain to the principal. Unfortunately I don't think it will change anything. The economic fundamentals are working against educational quality.

 

Having said that, I think parents have to decide to focus on what they believe to be the fundamentals. I'm less concerned about grades that the ability of my kids to read/think logically and critically. Just my opinion as an educator of 30 years or so. Most schools don't do that well anyway. Parents, community, the kids themselves have to step up to the plate to make a difference. 

 

Don't mean to sound cynical, but my observations of the best and brightest students/employees usually has been that they were successful in spite of their education. The Philippines might be an extreme case, but I've seen more than my share of 18 year olds back home who were the products of educational systems that left them without the ability to do basic math, read, write, think, and do stuff, etc.

 

So if the teachers are lazy, corrupt, or whatever - you need to learn to do an end run around them. Schools are okay for a diploma but the real educational bread and butter can and maybe should be developed someplace else in the first place.

 

All public schools (DepEd) are supported by taxes in the Philippines. Most private schools here don't offer higher teacher salaries because they don't have to. There are plenty of teachers out there without a DepEd contract. It's a buyer's market unless the school is competing with the international schools. They increase tuition when they want more profit. The teachers don't see that money. Private schools must meet the same standards that are imposed on public schools. That isn't saying much. If children learn to think critically, higher grades will almost always follow...and certainly the parents will ALWAYS have the primary responsibility for their child's education.

 

What about home schooling? Teaching your child at home, totally and completely. Maybe worth considering if you have the time available and say just one or two kids to manage. There are various home schooling websites and forums with all sorts of help and education materials available.

 

And maybe hire a tutor to teach those difficult subjects to your child at your residence. Plus you may be able to purchase and download a curriculum package from your home country... that will prepare your child for the college entrance exam back in your home country.

 

Home schooling means you can be flexible with your kid's study timetable, you can give your child the education and life skills that you want him to have ...and you can travel together anywhere anytime, as long as you have an internet connection. The down side, some folks say, is the lack of social interaction that the student would normally have with his classmates.

 

What do you parents think? Have you considered home schooling? It may be the best way to go...

 

We are pretty much home schooling anyway right now with the exception of testing. Hopefully Ateneo next year will step up and do more actual teaching. However, a big part of a child's schooling is learning how to act and react around other people (other students and those in authority). That is a very tricky subject to teach in a home school setting where the child's main interactions are with his or her parents. They need to mix with other children. My daughter has taken to that like a duck to water.

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7th grade weekend homework:

 

do a 'project' on Renaissance art.

 

but they don't have any books

 

nor have the students received any instruction on the topic.

 

they are required to print out the wikipedia article on the topic

 

but only from the teacher's sideline internet cafe business; no 'home printing' allowed.

 

reading of the printed material is, of course, irrelevant.

 

sigh

 

gave the kid 10 pesos for printing, broke out my old college janson's history of art, and am downloading some documentaries.

 

but still: makes you wanna holler.

 

oh, and it must be presented in special 25-peso colored folders only sold by guess who?

 

Just think of all the GOOD your child will get out of this and how much they will be able to use all this wonderful knowledge in the real world.

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Hogan1950

 

 

What most people don't realize is that the public schools DO have budgets for these kinds of things, but the principals and district administrators divert the money to their own pockets or their own pet projects (like a new laptop to take home at night). It was one of the things that drove me crazy in the year I was dating my wife. They would "inspect" her classroom and tell her all of the "features that were required, but they never provided any money for anything. If she didn't want to get marked down, she had to provide everything. And...if they weren't provided, she would receive a low ranking, which could affect her pay and her future opportunities.

 

When she got her classroom, it had four unpainted plaster walls, a door with a broken lock, wooden louver window openings a small teacher's desk, student desks and a blackboard. Everything else she had to provide. The walls and ceiling had no paint, so she painted them. The window openings had no mosquito screens, so she put screens up to prevent her students from getting dengue. The openings in the wooden louvers were so big, everything going on outside her classroom distracted her students, so she made and installed curtains. She installed a fire extinguisher, a water dispenser, all classroom decorations and learning aids and numerous things that were required but were never used.

 

 

 

Yeah, I know that there is money in the budget for that stuff, but gets diverted "elsewhere".  I guess I was being too polite to come right out and say it, which was dumb of me.  There was no need to p*ssy foot around it.

 

What you describe sounds pretty much exactly what my wife experienced.  Any improvements that happened to her classroom were done and paid for by her.

 

As to the bribes to get contracts, she had never heard of that happening, but thought it might.  Did see lots of cronyism though.  Actually, her one brother got his job because he was good friends with someone on the barangay council.  One of her nieces could have used some connections to get a job with the local school too, but didn't use said connections, so no job.

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goggleye

A friend of mine had kids at the high school at the north campus of Univ of San Carlos  the teachers were competent  and demanding   the only thing i would say is they do have to do lots of projects and I wondered of the educational value of the projects  and there seemed to  be little concern of the finances of the parents from the contant expense of projects   

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cvgtpc1

A friend of mine had kids at the high school at the north campus of Univ of San Carlos  the teachers were competent  and demanding   the only thing i would say is they do have to do lots of projects and I wondered of the educational value of the projects  and there seemed to  be little concern of the finances of the parents from the contant expense of projects   

 

You got that right, glad I make more than the average Filipino.  This happens at all schools.

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