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7th grade weekend homework


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BossHog

7th grade weekend homework:


 


do a 'project' on Renaissance art.


 


but they don't have any books


 


nor have the students received any instruction on the topic.


 


they are required to print out the wikipedia article on the topic


 


but only from the teacher's sideline internet cafe business; no 'home printing' allowed.


 


reading of the printed material is, of course, irrelevant.


 


sigh


 


gave the kid 10 pesos for printing, broke out my old college janson's history of art, and am downloading some documentaries.


 


but still: makes you wanna holler.


 


oh, and it must be presented in special 25-peso colored folders only sold by guess who?


Edited by BossHog
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bahalina buong

Extortion...it's more fun in the Philippines!

 

 

Is there no shame?

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Sorry to hear your description. Sadly, I have experienced this sort of behaviour for many years, with three kids in school. In our case, the teacher did not have any sort of financial benefit. It was more incompetence and laziness, and for most of the teachers.

 

What is common now is for the teacher to give "notes" to be used for the class. This is in lieu of actual lessons. The "notes" are placed onto a USB thumb drive and then one student is assigned to distribute the "notes". This can be done in several ways. Get the "notes" printed, make copies of the data or post it on facebook.

 

Sadly, the "notes" are usually Wikipedia articles and most written at the college level, with vocabulary way beyond the grasp of the students. In addition, there may be photo copies of some textbook pages, again at the college level. I finally figured it out and realized the teachers were simply using the materials they used in college. No need to develop a curriculum or teaching plan. Just use the shit they used in college.

 

This is so common that the only time the students get an actual lesson is when a student teacher is assigned to the classroom.

 

This is at a private school located within a university. This applies to the elementary as well as high school level.

 

We have known about the situation where the teachers profited from these "research" projects, but when the teacher was called out, they stopped. We haven't had that experience yet.

 

This all used to upset me, but it became apparent it is so wide spread that we would certainly encounter this just about anywhere our kids go to school. The problem of this fake research is so much a part of the education system that the teachers themselves don't really know what else to do. The ones doing the teachings are a product of the same methods.

 

My eldest child is doing well but in large part because we ignore the teachings when we can and learn the material in our own way. That is rIsky though, since exams are written based upon the learning by rote method. It is these "research projects" that earn them the extra points. The system is set up so that a student can easily fail exams, and still be an honor student. Don't really need to know the material, just follow the leader.

 

My children all regularly fail the Filipino language exams. However, they pass the course and often make the honor role in spite of this. They barely know any Tagalog.

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The kid walks home in the rain.

 

Mum: Why didn't you catch a motorela?

Kid: I bought candy with the motorela money.

Mum: But I told you never to leave the school grounds to buy candy.

Kid: No need, the teacher sells us candy.

 

What can you do?

 

KonC

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Headshot

At a Catholic school in Consolacion, where our daughter is in nursery school, we see very little evidence that the teachers do any "teaching" at all, with the exception that they DO teach the children a new song and a new dance every month (which the children have to perform in front of the student body). Of course, we get to buy costumes for each performance.

 

The children DO have textbooks for every subject. That is amazing in and of itself. The textbooks the nursery students are using are on-level for kinder 2 students. For academic studies, the teachers send notes home in the child's "diary" so the parents know what to teach their children each week. You only have two choices. you either teach your children their lessons, or your children fail their exams (which the teachers do administer).

 

Grading is a mystery, as my daughter had perfect scores on her mid-term exam, her final exam and her book work, but somehow they still managed to give her some A- grades on her report card (along with some A's) and she was ranked second in her class. The grading system is anything but transparent, and parents can't even look in the teacher's grading book. There are no parent/teacher conferences unless you insist and make an appointment on your own. This is one of the bigger and better schools in the area, so it ought to be better than that. We are extremely proud of our daughter regardless of what the school does.

 

The bright side, is that because my wife (who is a certified elementary teacher) and I spend so much time teaching our daughter her lessons, she can already read three and four letter words...at three years old.

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At a Catholic school in Consolacion, where our daughter is in nursery school, we see very little evidence that the teachers do any "teaching" at all, with the exception that they DO teach the children a new song and a new dance every month (which the children have to perform in front of the student body). Of course, we get to buy costumes for each performance.

 

The children DO have textbooks for every subject. That is amazing in and of itself. The textbooks the nursery students are using are on-level for kinder 2 students. For academic studies, the teachers send notes home in the child's "diary" so the parents know what to teach their children each week. You only have two choices. you either teach your children their lessons, or your children fail their exams (which the teachers do administer).

 

Grading is a mystery, as my daughter had perfect scores on her mid-term exam, her final exam and her book work, but somehow they still managed to give her some A- grades on her report card (along with some A's) and she was ranked second in her class. The grading system is anything but transparent, and parents can't even look in the teacher's grading book. There are no parent/teacher conferences unless you insist and make an appointment on your own. This is one of the bigger and better schools in the area, so it ought to be better than that. We are extremely proud of our daughter regardless of what the school does.

 

The bright side, is that because my wife (who is a certified elementary teacher) and I spend so much time teaching our daughter her lessons, she can already read three and four letter words...at three years old.

Thanks for sharing the info. The school we have used for our kids is considered to be the best in our area. To be clear, it is actually two schools. The elementary school and a "laboratory high school". Both are basically set up to meet the needs of faculty and staff. In effect, these kids get priority for enrollment. Tuition for the elementary school is similar to other private schools, except much reduced for the children of the staff. At the high school tuition is very small......but you get what you pay for. As a "laboratory"high school, the staff are employees of the college. Makes for a difficult situation for the principal since the teachers don't actually work for him.

 

What amazes me is how the school is considered to be so good. In reality, the academic stands at the school are very poor. However, since it has this reputation, there's essentially no criticism.

 

I want to share a small story that may explain a lot about the way the schools are. My daughter does very well in school, learning quickly and adapts to the social life of the students. She had a group of friends and all was great. However, as the year progresses (sixth grade) she started to excel even more than before. Good news right?

 

Not in the view of some of her classmates. Some stopped being friends and announced why. They didn't like it that she was out-performing the others. She was now getting higher grades, so they resented it.

 

I don't believe this is something the students came up with. I'm convinced it is the obsession among some to alwasy be numver one, even if that involved cheating or intimidating others. I think the students learned from their parents this resentment.

 

I'm very tolerant of this since my children all have adapted well and are learning subjects in spite of the poor efforts of the staff.

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colemanlee

Here I am putting six between the ages of 7 and 18 thru school.   My wife and I are very involved in their education.  We attend every function held at the school.   A couple of things I am very keen on is that they speak English, have a knowledge of the rest of the world, math and science. 

I have met the English teacher...she can not carry on a conversation with me in English....I have met the math teacher, she can not discuss rudimentary Algebra....as we live in Tacloban the "home language is Waray Waray, I am proud to report they can speak that.   The school does seem to be pretty good at teaching Philippine history, Catholic Church history, beliefs, and fundamentals.

What to do?  Home school, discuss current world events, teach math, speak English only in the house...watch the news, not TV Patrol but CNN, FOX and the like....encourage them to ask questions about anything they dont understand....If you can find a tutor that has and education, hire them...I make my kids go to school all year long...in the summer they go to private school as I cant afford to send six to private school all year long..

Honestly what I have found is if someone here graduates college here they have about a high school education in the states....I helped my wife through her Accountancy degree, she passed the boards....was pretty much what I learned senior year in high school.....sad is it not?

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Skywalker

Keep the poor ignorant.

 

Easier to manage.

 

Same in every Country in SE Asia, except Singapore.

 

I put one of my kids into a different school last year, and saw a dramatic improvement in grades.  The school isn't really any better, but he is no longer surrounded by his loser friends distracting him.  

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broden

 

7th grade weekend homework:

 

do a 'project' on Renaissance art.

 

but they don't have any books

 

nor have the students received any instruction on the topic.

 

they are required to print out the wikipedia article on the topic

 

but only from the teacher's sideline internet cafe business; no 'home printing' allowed.

 

reading of the printed material is, of course, irrelevant.

 

sigh

 

gave the kid 10 pesos for printing, broke out my old college janson's history of art, and am downloading some documentaries.

 

but still: makes you wanna holler.

 

oh, and it must be presented in special 25-peso colored folders only sold by guess who?

 

sounds like the college teachers here who write some over priced book then make it mandatory for their class

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Steve and Myrlita

You might file a complaint with the DeptEd but then again, they might have nationalism and Filipino Pride and tell you if you don't like it, take your kids and leave. Yes, I've seen the incompetence up close and personal here. I too met an English teacher who couldn't speak a word of it. I had Myrlita translate to the teacher what business she had teaching a subject she has no knowledge of? This was my stepson's English teacher.

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to_dave007

sounds like the college teachers here who write some over priced book then make it mandatory for their class

 

???  This is news?  Was happening in Canada when I was in university.  Nothing new about that.  Happens at the best schools around the world.

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broden

???  This is news?  Was happening in Canada when I was in university.  Nothing new about that.  Happens at the best schools around the world.

nah 

 

if it was i would of posted it in the news forum

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to_dave007

Here I am putting six between the ages of 7 and 18 thru school.   My wife and I are very involved in their education.  We attend every function held at the school.   A couple of things I am very keen on is that they speak English, have a knowledge of the rest of the world, math and science. 

I have met the English teacher...she can not carry on a conversation with me in English....I have met the math teacher, she can not discuss rudimentary Algebra....as we live in Tacloban the "home language is Waray Waray, I am proud to report they can speak that.   The school does seem to be pretty good at teaching Philippine history, Catholic Church history, beliefs, and fundamentals.

What to do?  Home school, discuss current world events, teach math, speak English only in the house...watch the news, not TV Patrol but CNN, FOX and the like....encourage them to ask questions about anything they dont understand....If you can find a tutor that has and education, hire them...I make my kids go to school all year long...in the summer they go to private school as I cant afford to send six to private school all year long..

Honestly what I have found is if someone here graduates college here they have about a high school education in the states....I helped my wife through her Accountancy degree, she passed the boards....was pretty much what I learned senior year in high school.....sad is it not?

 

Kudo's to you and your wife for your commitment.

 

And please..  have some sympathy for the schools that struggle to hire fully qualified teachers in a country that routinely loses it's best and brightest to so many other countries around the world.

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Hogan1950

When my wife was teaching in a small barangay school in the province, this kind of thing would drive her crazy.  She hated when teachers did anything to make a little money from her students or their parents.  However, she could see why some would do these things.  Teachers there were basically extorted for money all the time.  

 

The school needs to send kids to this campus journalism competition, and the registration fee is 1500P each, and if one of the kids family cant come up with the fee, the supervising teacher has to.  The school has no funds for this kind of thing, so the teacher has to come up with the money, or her job will be in jeopardy, or at the very least will never get a promotion.

 

Another example is classroom improvement.  One time, there was going to be a big evaluation of the school infrastructure in the coming year, so the principal decided all the classrooms needed to be repainted and have tile floors installed.  Of course, no money in the school budget for that, so guess who has to pay for the materials and installation of tiles in their classrooms?

 

There is little wonder why some become very jaded by the whole thing, and either try to make back a little money in these ways, and/or just start to mail it in on the teaching aspect of it.  That doesn't excuse the behaviour, but does help to explain how it has become so endemic to the schools in the Philippines.   

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colemanlee

After Yolanda, before the school my youngest attend opened reopened...the parents, not the teachers, spent weeks cleaning the school, removing mud, trash, making small repairs, then NGO's did the major things like roofs and paint....in the high school, the students did the painting and refinishing of furniture etc....then the NGO's again did the major repair.....I never saw once, not once any Philippine govt. help.....but when the schools reopened you bet all the politicians were there with their smiling faces to take credit....

 

One of our close friends is a teacher here, Masters degree and extremely smart, she cant get a job as a public school teacher because she cant afford to pay the director the 50k bonus to get hired in the public school system....so she works in a private school making half of what a govt teacher does.  Here thats a difference of 10k per month.  Public 20k  Private 10k

 

Steve recommended going to the board and complaining about the curriculum and the quality of teachers...Im afraid that would not work here, not because of nationalism but because the teachers working in the public schools have already paid for their jobs....Im not sure if that happens everywhere as I have no first hand knowledge of anywhere but here in Tacloban, Hopefully some of you that have wifes or friends that are teachers in other places can say what is done elsewhere.... 

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