Jump to content

Wind power would do well here.


Recommended Posts

Well, it isn't the Philippines. But, I tell ya, there are some windy days up here in the Pacific Northwest. Wind turbines would do well here, for sure. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

 

 

Well, it isn't the Philippines. But, I tell ya, there are some windy days up here in the Pacific Northwest. Wind turbines would do well here, for sure. 

Actually there are several wind farms in eastern Oregon. Eastern Oregon is much different than where you are at, mostly high desert much like the midwest.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oregon wind farms

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power_in_Oregon

 

Companies

Vestas, the largest wind turbine manufacturer in the world as of 2009, has its North American headquarters in Portland, Oregon.[5][6] Iberdrola Renewables, one of the larger wind farm operators, also bases their American offices in Portlanda

 

 

 

Vestas is a DANISH company

Edited by Woolf
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I remember now, a while back, seeing a video of Wranglerstar (a guy on Youtube) going to one of the wind farms in the northern part of the state, I think? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scottiev

The Columbia River gorge is full of windmills..thats a real nice drive too Paul . Multnomah Falls and the road above the hyway are one of my favorites drives

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Columbia River gorge is full of windmills..thats a real nice drive too Paul . Multnomah Falls and the road above the hyway are one of my favorites drives

 

 

No doubt, this is definitely a beautiful state. I took a long, winding road a couple of days ago - one I damned sure would NOT have wanted to ride along with Matrix driving, for about 10 kilometers. It was a small two lane, winding up and down hills, and through country side and residential areas. very, very nice. I wish I had of stopped and taken photos, now that I look back.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scottiev

The one I am talking about is VERY windy also.. it goes along the Columbia then climbs  , great view lots of waterfalls and just a fun drive

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

images-16_zps0a4c610a.jpg

 

Windmills in luzon

Project by bong bong marcos

More are being added

Link to post
Share on other sites
mactanfamily

It's great if you don't have to live near it or pay for it. Ever watch the documentary "Windfall"? Very informative. 

 

The 400-foot, 600,000-pound turbines look much less benign up close.

Wind turbines rarely produce their advertised full power.  On average, wind turbines only produce about 20% of their nameplate rating.
Wind power is unreliable and undispatchable.  When it is needed most, it will likely be unavailable to provide any power when it is needed most.
Wind power is not clean.  It takes a lot of dirty energy to make the materials, manufacture and install a wind turbine facility. It takes millions of dollars to route and install new copper wiring to get that power somewhere. Think of all that copper mining. The wind is usually no where near the facility it needs to get to. Can you imagine the size of all those gears that eventually wear out. How about the tons of lubrication  oil needed. The maintenance on those things is insane. 
Wind turbines consume electricity whether operating or not.  Often this power is not even metered.  Care to guess who is paying the bill for this power?
 
Personally I'd rather live next to nuke than this thing flickering light like a strobe all day, never ending insanity of SWOOSH.....SWOOSH, throwing car sized ice chunks through my roof.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

In southeast Wyoming, there is a wind farm with hundreds of wind turbine generators. When the US Fish and Wildlife Service was looking for a safe place to reintroduce the critically endangered black-footed ferret into the wild, they chose an area in the middle of the wind farm. Why? They chose it because every bird in the area had been wiped out by the wind turbine generators (including all of the birds of prey that normally would prey on the ferrets and the prairie dogs that black-footed ferrets eat. Even if a bird doesn't get hit by a blade, the shockwave caused by the blades spinning around knocks the birds out and causes them to crash headfirst into the ground. All the US Fish and Wildlife Service had to do to make the area safe for ferrets was go in and trap any coyotes and bobcats living in the area, and the ferrets suddenly became the top predator in the area with the prairie dogs all to themselves.

 

People need to remember that there is no electric generation source that has no environmental impact. Some environmental effects are not readily apparent, but they are there. That said, I think wind generation is a very good fit for the Philippines, but the turbines need to be placed so they have minimal impact on native birds (that are often endangered or at least threatened. The plan on Cebu to place wind generators on the highest ridgelines of the Cordillera is probably a good one provided areas are left open for the birds to fly through, but they need to know there will be bird casualties. Since nobody lives in the areas where they are planning to put the generators, the sound problem shouldn't be an issue. They will have to ensure that squatters don't move into the area as soon as roads are cut along the ridges though

Link to post
Share on other sites
mactanfamily

Olango Island next to Mactan is on the East Asian Migratory Flyway that includes the Philippines is one of the most important shorebird and waterbird migratory flyways in the world. A total of 77 species of migratory birds use this flyway, and Olango Island supports 62% of this number.

 

A team from Carnegie Mellon University used historical hurricane data to see if wind farms in different coastal areas could stand up to the storms. They looked at four areas in the Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions currently under consideration as locations for wind farms. They then modeled how much hurricanes in these areas could damage a 5-megawatt wind turbinedesign similar to those being installed in northern Europe. 
 
According to the researchers’ model, hurricanes ranked Category 3 and higher could buckle up to 46 percent of these traditional turbine towers. 
 
Yolanda blew over 200mph. Good luck. 
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..