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Solar grid-tie system - Veco Solar program


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Hello everybody

 

I am still out of the country, but will be back in January. However, this time I want built a grid-tie system and want to know if somebody in Cebu (province) has already done it (or know somebody) and if so :

 

1. What is the approx. cost per Watt you spent? That does include everything not only panels, but the whole installation, including application (I did some google search and in the US it is around 3US/Watt - that is what my search returned, so no other backup. Here in Switzerland is a little bit higher, also only backed up by google search)

 

2. Any experience with the application (I know there are quite a few requirements - I have the requirements from Veco, but would like to know from somebody who did it --> from OBO permit to ERC certificate:)

 

3. Any installer who you might recommend or assist? 

 

4. Off topic questions: Would you go with micro inverter or string type inverter (centralized)  like described here 

http://solarenergy.com/power-panels/pv-power-panel-installation-info/string-inverters-vs-micro-inverters-10-things-to-consider

 

I would really like to know about your real  "Cebu" experience - not only research done on google (like mine for now:), except that I contacted Veco and have the requirements and seem "happy" that somebody is interested - but who knows..)

 

Cheers and Thanks

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Hello

 

Of, course... in Liloan -North, which is still under Metro Cebu (which in inquired and it is covered) and our supplier is Veco

Edited by Cgu
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thebob

 

 

4. Off topic questions: Would you go with micro inverter or string type inverter (centralized)  like described here 

 

Personally I think that as long as your array is accessible then micro inverters allow you more flexibility and add redundancy. No single point of catastrophic failure and it is easier to expand you installation.

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4. Off topic questions: Would you go with micro inverter or string type inverter (centralized)  like described here 

 

 

I use micro inverters on my grid tied roof mounted array in the UK.  They have been operating for just over 3 years now.  The reason for micro inverters was to maximise the output in the winter months because of shading of the low winter sun by tall trees in neighbours gardens. The micro inverters, like the panels, came with a 25 year guarantee, the alternative string inverter was from memory only 10 or 12 years.

 

The micro inverters are from Enecsys.  What I have come to appreciate since installation is the data available per panel.  Not that I have had any faults, but you can see the impact of the shading on the output of each of the lower panels as the sun moves.  This data provision requires an active internet connection and is accessed via the Enecsys website  (details of the system are available on their website).  The active internet connection requirement to access the data for this make of micro inverter may be a problem in the Philippines.  A friends installation uses a string inverter which came with a separate monitoring module with an LCD screen giving current and historic output data.

 

As an aside, if I ever find myself in the situation of living in a house long term in the Philippines, I would first be interested in an off grid system so I had resilience when dealing with power outages.  Whether these outages stemmed from natural disasters or weakness in the supply grid.  My second priority would be grid tied to reduce electricity costs.

 

I hope this helps.  In due course please update us with the details of your installation and all problems and solutions you face with it.

Many thanks

Chas 

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As an aside, if I ever find myself in the situation of living in a house long term in the Philippines, I would first be interested in an off grid system so I had resilience when dealing with power outages.  Whether these outages stemmed from natural disasters or weakness in the supply grid.  My second priority would be grid tied to reduce electricity costs.

I agree.

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They sure don't down south of the island

 

VECO's area stops at San Fernando, going south. I think, Consolacion going North? Or, it may be a bit farther than that. 

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VECO service area

 

http://www.veco.com.ph/page.html?main=company&sub1=profile&sub2=

 

Visayan Electric Company, Inc. (VECO) is the second largest electric utility in the Philippines. It serves the cities of Cebu, Mandaue, Talisay, Naga and four municipalities of the greater part of Metro Cebu - Liloan, Consolacion, Minglanilla and San Fernando

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VECO service area

 

http://www.veco.com.ph/page.html?main=company&sub1=profile&sub2=

 

Visayan Electric Company, Inc. (VECO) is the second largest electric utility in the Philippines. It serves the cities of Cebu, Mandaue, Talisay, Naga and four municipalities of the greater part of Metro Cebu - Liloan, Consolacion, Minglanilla and San Fernando

 

I stand corrected, it's Lilo-An, for VECO's northern limit.

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3. Any installer who you might recommend or assist?

I can help / assist you if you have the technical blueprints and plans.

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I can help / assist you if you have the technical blueprints and plans.

 

That would be nice. However, the installer should provide me with the blueprints and plans, as stated by the VECO requirements:

 
3. Electrical plan with RE modification ( signed and sealed by Professional Electrical Engineer)
4. Technical Specification of the component used. ( Inverter , Panels and protection. )
For Distribution Impact study specification requirements:
1. Technical specifications specifying the voltage requirement of the PV inverter
2. Short-circuit current contribution (refer to your manufacturer)**
3. Applied load (peak load if necessary)* and PV capacity
4. Typical 24hr generation profile of the PV system
5. Harmonic Current Injection (refer to manufacturer type verification test reports)**
6. Other documents and/or certificates showing that the PV system passes international

standards such as IEC, IEEE and others 

 

Thats why I am looking for an installer (and a quote - or say how much will a 1W cost me)

 

Thanks for a reply. 

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NOSOCALPINOY

I too would just consider an off-gird system depending if the total cost would pay for itself in 5 to 7 yrs.

Since my major use is our air conditioning, I just may install 3 separate solar powered air conditioning units, 1 for the downstairs and in the 2 bedrooms, which would probably be cheaper than a full blown system for the entire house.  We'll see in time how much these solar energy systems will cost. I do not even know anyone having a solar energy powered home in our area. 

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I too would just consider an off-gird system depending if the total cost would pay for itself in 5 to 7 yrs.

Since my major use is our air conditioning, I just may install 3 separate solar powered air conditioning units, 1 for the downstairs and in the 2 bedrooms, which would probably be cheaper than a full blown system for the entire house.  We'll see in time how much these solar energy systems will cost. I do not even know anyone having a solar energy powered home in our area. 

 

Well, I partially agree. I depends on some factors. Where we live outages are very seldom and for that I can buy a generator for such events (even with some natural events). One liter of diesel gives me around 2-3 days power (around 2-3kwh; 1 Liter ~ 10kwh), but I only need a 2kw generator for such events. In a tie grid system (if it survives:), but survival rate is same as off grid), during the day I can use the own generated power (grid tie) for basic necessity. Off grid systems are more expensive and you waste energy (if batteries waste around 20%, inverter 5% and controller 5% = 70% - but these are expensive batteries; grid tie only inverter 5% = 95%) and you need to size it at least double what your daily needs are (batteries should not discharge more than 50%) and you have no spare day yet, so rather size it 3-4 times. As well you need to position the batteries very near the solar panels, otherwise you add cost and waste energy. With micro inverters grid tie you do not need any long cables, as it gets converted by the panel into AC. With batteries, if you do not use it, it is wasted energy, as you cannot load the next day more. With grid-tie nothing is lost.

 

So all in all your payback is shorter (in both options you do not get money back, but with grid-tie I get a wattage balance, which I can use up).

 

 

.... but this should be another topic. 

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