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Power firm pushes solar electrification of homes


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This should help alleviate some of the power problems.

 

 

CEBU, Philippines - The Visayan Electric Company aims to electrify more homes with solar power.

Veco chief operating officer Sebastian Lacson said “going solar means not only helping protect the environment but also saving money on electricity bills.”

The power distribution firm, with franchise area spanning from Liloan to San Fernando, Cebu, is the first distribution utility in the country to promote the use of solar energy to its customers through their “Green Energy for a Brighter Future” campaign.

Veco Solar is a joint project with Enfinity, which is the sixth largest developer of solar photovoltaic projects in the world and a market leader in Europe.

The initiative carries the objective of providing a helping hand to the government to protect the environment against pollution.

To date, Solar Enfinity has powered at least four residences while Veco currently has 60 pending applications from residential owners who wished to use solar panels for the electricity requirements at home. READ MORE

 

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As already stated many times, they will install 2 digital meters  one will count in and the other will count out   My meter here is digital   btw it is easy to stop a mechanical meter if the mecha

To reiterate, I know very little about grid-tied systems. You may know more than I do. I can only state what I do know.   Either way, I know a house would not be connected to the DC side of the inve

This should help alleviate some of the power problems.    

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ellenbrook2001

happen a lot in AUSTRALIA you even sell back your supply very expensive to be installed but you save a lot in the long run . 

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rainymike

I think solar is a good idea.

 

But although I'm not an expert in this area by any means, I suspect they'd get more immediate returns and efficiencies by upgrading the power grid. Judging by the way cities are wired in this country, the amount of transmission losses must be pretty high. 

 

I'm afraid it's more environmental mumbo-jumbo and less of really trying to fix the problems where they lie. Maybe some of the engineer types can chime in on this with expert opinion.

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thebob
But although I'm not an expert in this area by any means, I suspect they'd get more immediate returns and efficiencies by upgrading the power grid. Judging by the way cities are wired in this country, the amount of transmission losses must be pretty high. 

 

Grid tied solar actually "reduces" the line transmission losses because your excess power is more likely to be used locally. I'd put up a couple of KW's of panels immediately if a program existed in my area.

Edited by thebob
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Dublin boy

I put in 15kva and they will not buy it back all I got was that blank look when I went to the local office. Grid tied sir what is that so I just run off loads of battery's until they finally catch up with the times.

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I put in 15kva and they will not buy it back all I got was that blank look when I went to the local office. Grid tied sir what is that so I just run off loads of battery's until they finally catch up with the times.

 

Where are you?

 

http://cebudailynews.inquirer.net/33730/vecos-net-metering-encourages-solar-generation-power-savings

 

Extract (June 2014):

 

Under this program, those who generate their own electricity, either partially or in whole, can feed in their excess or unused power to Veco. This program has been encouraging consumers to install solar panels in their homes, to save on power cost at the same time decreasing demand from the grid which has been experiencing volatile power supply.

 

“Anything you generate, you sell it to VECO (Visayan Electric Co.),” Lacson said.

 

And for those in NCR:

 

http://www.meralco.com.ph/pdf/newsandupdates/2013/NW04713.pdf

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Dublin boy

Dalaguete Cebu , yes I have read this and shown them a government directive on buying back the power and just get that dumb look. I also saw the chief engineer he also had no idea. I gave up for nowv

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Sun Valley Idaho had a program to buy back. But when the federal funding was pulled, it all went away. Seems that the solar power was hitting the grid when the sun was shining and they needed it the least. After dark when the heaters are turned up, they needed the hydroelectric power to replace the solar, but it is cheaper if bought on a 24/7 basis. Cebu however gets more sun, at least on average, and should need the power to carry daytime/nighttime differential aircon load. Of coarse the problem is that in Cebu the nighttime load is pretty high too. But it can not be more than 80% of the daytime, so about 20% could come from solar sources. If they are buying the power when they can use it, then they should not end the program. 

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Sun Valley Idaho had a program to buy back. But when the federal funding was pulled, it all went away. Seems that the solar power was hitting the grid when the sun was shining and they needed it the least. After dark when the heaters are turned up, they needed the hydroelectric power to replace the solar, but it is cheaper if bought on a 24/7 basis. Cebu however gets more sun, at least on average, and should need the power to carry daytime/nighttime differential aircon load. Of coarse the problem is that in Cebu the nighttime load is pretty high too. But it can not be more than 80% of the daytime, so about 20% could come from solar sources. If they are buying the power when they can use it, then they should not end the program. 

 

You've identified one of the basic fallacies with solar power in general and net metering schemes in particular. As you say, electricity demand in hot countries tends to be greater during the day because of greater air conditioning use and this correlates with the production of solar power. In colder climates the surplus electricity generated during the daytime sunshine is only of value if it can be sold on to a country under a different time zone - say for night-time heating. Storing electricity is inefficient wherever you are.

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Dalaguete Cebu , yes I have read this and shown them a government directive on buying back the power and just get that dumb look. I also saw the chief engineer he also had no idea. I gave up for now

 

If you have a mechanical watt-hour meter (the kind where the wheels spin around), the utility has no choice but to "buy it back" when you are producing excess power. If you are producing more power than you are consuming, then the meter will run backwards, recording the electricity flowing in the opposite direction (since your generation is feeding other load on their system). As long as your generation doesn't exceed you load on a monthly basis, then it will lower the net kilowatts used, and therefore reduce your bill. If your generation does exceed your load, that is where it gets sticky if the power company doesn't have a "buy back" program. They may not pay for any excess production (on a monthly basis), and the investment in excess generation is wasted. For that reason, you should size your generation to be less than your average load, so you are still paying a small power bill each month.

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If you have a mechanical watt-hour meter (the kind where the wheels spin around), the utility has no choice but to "buy it back" when you are producing excess power. If you are producing more power than you are consuming, then the meter will run backwards, recording the electricity flowing in the opposite direction (since your generation is feeding other load on their system). As long as your generation doesn't exceed you load on a monthly basis, then it will lower the net kilowatts used, and therefore reduce your bill. If your generation does exceed your load, that is where it gets sticky if the power company doesn't have a "buy back" program. They may not pay for any excess production (on a monthly basis), and the investment in excess generation is wasted. For that reason, you should size your generation to be less than your average load, so you are still paying a small power bill each month.

 

 

As already stated many times, they will install 2 digital meters  one will count in and the other will count out

 

My meter here is digital

 

btw it is easy to stop a mechanical meter if the mechanical meter has a small detent it will prevent it from running backwards 

some mechanical meters have that detent

Edited by Woolf
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btw it is easy to stop a mechanical meter if the mechanical meter has a small detent it will prevent it from running backwards  some mechanical meters have that detent

 

Yepper. I was about to post that myself. 

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Moalboal.

 

Dalaguete Cebu 

 

I don't think CEBECO has a program available in either of your areas?

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If you have a mechanical watt-hour meter (the kind where the wheels spin around), the utility has no choice but to "buy it back" when you are producing excess power. If you are producing more power than you are consuming, then the meter will run backwards, recording the electricity flowing in the opposite direction (since your generation is feeding other load on their system). As long as your generation doesn't exceed you load on a monthly basis, then it will lower the net kilowatts used, and therefore reduce your bill. If your generation does exceed your load, that is where it gets sticky if the power company doesn't have a "buy back" program. They may not pay for any excess production (on a monthly basis), and the investment in excess generation is wasted. For that reason, you should size your generation to be less than your average load, so you are still paying a small power bill each month.

 

 

Are you suggesting,  connecting your solar power system to the grid without informing the power company ?

 

I hope not

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