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Mt Pinatubo erupted around the same time they where trying to renew the contracts ,,

the place was a mess , maybe the US figured it was more trouble then it was worth

The US bases, then and tomorrow?
SHOOTING STRAIGHT By Bobit S. Avila (The Philippine Star) | Updated March 27, 2014 - 12:00am
 

June 15, 2014 marks the 23rd anniversary of the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, considered one of the major natural disasters that the world had ever seen. Three months later, the Philippine Senate in a historic vote of 12 to 11 voted to reject the new 10-year US Bases Treaty that the Bush Administration prepared with the Philippine government headed by then President Cory Aquino. Of course the leftists and Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) were overjoyed that finally, the hated American imperialists were booted out of their military bases in the Philippines.

But in my book, to say that the 12 Philippine Senators is solely responsible for rejecting the new US Bases Treaty isn’t exactly the whole truth. The real truth why the Americans had to leave their US military bases in the Philippines happened three months earlier when Mt. Pinatubo erupted and sent the US military to hurriedly depart out of Subic Naval Base and Clark Air Force Base. The only thing that the 12 Senators did was stab the dead corpse of this US Bases Treaty.

For the record, I supported the continued stay of the US military bases in the Philippines for the simple reason that US military bases produce jobs for many Filipinos who are directly hired by either the US Navy or the US Air Force. Back in the old days, before the era of the Internet, we would learn about the happenings on the US military via the sidewalk stores in Avenida Rizal where I had a favorite magazine dealer who sold me my favorite Air Force magazines and the US Navy’s Proceedings magazines. That disappeared when the Yanks pulled out from Clark and Subic.

But we know well enough that the presence of US servicemen in our country had a huge negative effect on our women folk. If at all, I wanted the Americans out, it was only for this reason… that the US Servicemen exploited the poverty of our Filipino women. This was the leftist line and I also took it because I saw it all when I visited the US Naval Base in Subic and my tour guide was no less than Mayor Richard “Dick” Gordon. I wasn’t a journalist at that time, but the Avila family and the Gordon family had the same business —  moviehouses — and that is why I already knew Dick Gordon then.

So when Mt. Pinatubo blew up (I was a witness to the June 16 eruption because I just came from Dagupan City on my way back to Manila for my flight to Cebu and it was pitch dark at 3 p.m.) the Americans literally abandoned their bases in Clark and Subic and at that time, nobody knew if they would ever return because of the enormous cost of rehabilitating those bases. And, above all, no one knew when the eruptions would end.

But in my book, the biggest casualty of the Americans leaving their bases here was the Philippine military. I remember Filipino Air Force pilots would tell me that whenever they were running out of fuel, all they needed to do is land in Clark or in Subic and get free fuel for their planes. This is not to mention that they also got a lot of spare parts for the Philippine Air Force planes were mostly made in the USA. Today, the Philippine Air Force is a shell of what it used to be… it’s mostly air without a force.

Opinion ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1
 

So the big debate that many pundits are having in  coffeehouses of Metro Manila is whether the Aquino regime should welcome the Americans back to their bases in Clark and Subic? Of course, this means a new treaty would have to be signed. But at this point, I would rather wait until after the 2016 presidential and senatorial elections because the Philippine Senate today no longer speaks for the Filipino people because they’ve got their hands dirtied by the pork scam and worse, they removed a sitting Chief Justice of the Supreme Court because President Aquino gave them more pork funds. How these monies were given and to whom are in the Senate’s and the Department of Budget (DBM) records.

In a few short weeks, US President Barack Obama is coming for his Asian Tour and I just hope that the US President won’t “pressure” President Aquino for this new treaty because he now controls both houses of Congress, the Senate and the House of Representatives. It would be disastrous for the US to have a new US Bases Treaty signed by members of the Senate that the Filipino people no longer trust.

Sure China today is threatening the Philippines but we never ever had any problem with China until President Aquino took power in Malacañang and refused to apologize to the people of Hong Kong for the Aug. 23, 2010 massacre of eight Hong Kong tourists out on holiday in the Philippines. But after the term of P-Noy, I strongly believe that out ties with China would improve vastly. As for the US Bases in the Philippines my take on this is simple. They can return to their bases here on condition that they would revive the Philippine military to its former glory.

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rainymike

For who sure not the stupid american tax payers charity begins at home ,,, 

I agree. Apple doesn't need Uncle Sam to open up factories here to build their pads. Let Apple pay. Or whomever. If it succeeds fine. Let 

Apple take the profits. If it fails - tough cookies. Governments are stupid, inefficient, and mostly in the way. Let the private sector - whether it be from China, Korea, or the US or wherever take the risks and reap the profits. Nothing like good old capitalism. Most Asian commies figured that out soon enough after the Cold War ended.

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SomeRandomGuy

I wonder, since the sex trade continued after the americans left, who is to blame for taking advantage of the poor females since then?

 

 

Bah Humbug

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When the bases closed, and just post-Pinatubo both AC and Subic were ghost towns.

Many bars closed some never to reopen.

 

The Filipino bars around Dau for example, kept going as they always do.

Some freelancers were still around, but appeared to do little business.

 

Gradually some bars reopened, or opened, and trade appeared to get better, but very VERY slowly.

 

Many Filipinos regretted the bases closing as they had good regular jobs.

Of those I spoke to, it was only the few who thought that "throwing the yanks out" was a good thing, and most of them were those who didnt rely upon the base for their livelyhood.

 

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streak03

I understand times change and that the US will do what it needs to do regarding strategic issues in the Asia-Pacific region, but I would hope that there's not a fecking dime of taxpayer money spent for reopening any bases anywhere in the country.   

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I wish I could find the quote but I remember reading a few months ago Richard Armitage (who was the US negotiator) was told early on by President Bush to fight for the bases, but they didn't really want them.

The Cold War had just come to an end and when Pinatubo blew her top I think the U.S. was even less willing to fight because of the costs of restoring the bases.

Things had changed a lot at Clark too. When I arrived in JAN '85 Clark had three squadrons of F-4's, 20 or more C-130's, 3 or 4 C-9's, aggressor aircraft for training, and a rescue helicopter squadron, by early '91 all that was left was 4 special ops C-130's, everything else was gone.

I was stationed at Clark January '85 - JUN '91, left 10 days before Pinatubo blew.

 

EDIT

 

I don't know what the actual number was but there was probably a 66% or so reduction of those who were assigned at Clark from early '85 - early '91. I remember driving on Clark in '91 thinking it was beginning to feel like a ghost town compared to what it once was.

 

EDIT OFF

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by J-Divert
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USMC-Retired

I will try and dig up some before and after photos of subic during this time. We stacked dead Filipinos in a gym and church. Mayor Gordon met us on the docks with shovels in hand. Sad day many lives were lost.

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Juan Ponce Enrile, who led the Senate at that time (and still does)

 

No not since last election it is now

 

President of the Senate of the Philippines

220px-Drilon_Cropped.jpg
Incumbent
Franklin Drilon

since July 22, 2013
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Dublin boy

An interesting read before my time so thanks for the education and yes I would love to see pictures of subic and clarke in its hay day. I'm also interested in the war in Asia so any one know any good sites please let me know. Thank you

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An interesting read before my time so thanks for the education and yes I would love to see pictures of subic and clarke in its hay day. I'm also interested in the war in Asia so any one know any good sites please let me know. Thank you

https://www.facebook.com/groups/150853065107010/photos/

 

 

http://web.archive.org/web/20030207040336/http://zcap.freeyellow.com/pix3.htm

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Just some random additional history when the Bases Agreement was first signed in 1947 (maybe '46 but I think '47) it was a 99 year agreement, the U.S. bases would still be there. During the mid '60's the agreement was renegotiated to expire in '92.

 

I loved being stationed at Clark and don't think I would have made a career of the Air Force if it had not been for the 6+ years I was stationed there.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Edited by J-Divert
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Headshot

You should have seen it back in 1968 through 1971. Just about everything going by air to or from Vietnam and Thailand went through Clark. It was humming.

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smokey

Just some random additional history when the Bases Agreement was first signed in 1947 (maybe '46 but I think '47) it was a 99 year agreement, the U.S. bases would still be there. During the mid '60's the agreement was renegotiated to expire in '92.

 

I loved being stationed at Clark and don't think I would have made a career of the Air Force if it had not been for the 6+ years I was stationed there.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

and everyone says a lease can not be broken ha ha ha 

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