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Remember that Aquino's mother never thought the US would leave completely. She was just trying to raise the rent.

 

 

This made me curious so I did a search and found this:

 

MANILA, Philippines — President Corazon Aquino today led thousands of marchers to the Senate to try to save a new U.S. lease on Subic Bay naval base that lawmakers have all but rejected. A bomb outside the Senate injured five people.

...

Opposition Sen. Juan Ponce Enrile (note 1), a former defense minister and bases opponent, called the rally and march "a futile exercise." The Senate adjourned for the day and was to resume deliberations tomorrow.

...

Yesterday, the Senate voted 12-11 in a preliminary vote to reject a lease extension for Subic, 50 miles northwest of Manila.

...

In Washington, President Bush said yesterday, "We've made our best offer." Defense Secretary Richard Cheney said if the agreement fails to win ratification, "We're gone." (note 2)

...

Aquino said the country needed the money provided for under the agreement (note 3)

 

 

Notes:

 

1 MANILA, Philippines — Senator Juan Ponce Enrile arrived Friday at the Philippine National Headquarters in Camp Crame where he surrendered to authorities after an arrest order was issued against him for plunder.

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/616957/juan-ponce-enrile-surrenders#ixzz3Gv3UZ82I

 

2 President Bush #1, Cheney sounds familiar, I seem to recall a Dick Cheney, naw...

 

3 100 peso note (yep that's a USA Flag)

 

post-8276-0-92509200-1414020220_thumb.jpg

 

Original: http://articles.philly.com/1991-09-10/news/25802740_1_president-corazon-aquino-today-subic-bay-anti-bases

 

 

Edited by Ronin
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smokey

i read that back then the lease on subic was 93 million dollars a year and when cory came to power there was a lot of back lash against the us because they let Marcos go to Hawaii so the powers to be could not stop cory from re signing the lease so they added a 0 to make it 930 million us a year and the us said nada 

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rainymike

Back in the day when we were caught up in the Cold War, the US and USSR played the smaller countries as they jockeyed for power. In the same fashion, the smaller countries often played the US against the Soviets for funding and support. It's how the world was at the time.

 

But, when the Soviet Union collapsed, lots of the small countries had no clue about how the game was changing. As odd as it may seem, some of the old Soviet allies did a better job of reading the changes in the wind than many American allies. Countries like Vietnam and China did well with the end of the cold war. Other countries are still trying to jerk America's chain with the 'Russians (or Chinese or Muslims or whatever) are coming' and are still locked into ineffective policies from a different era.

 

Want Subic and Clarke to be players again? Try turning one into a first class port and shipbuilding center for the region and the other into a world class airport. I suspect that will bring in one hell of a lot more pesos than beating the Russians/Chinese/Muslims are coming drum.

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Personally I'd like to see the US wash their hands of this whole mess. Seems to be a lot of anti American sentiment here nowadays, so give them what they want and let them see how it tastes

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Thank you, you must have a good internet connection.

        I did not know that Corey had gone that far trying to keep the US here. Sounds a lot like she was hung up then by her own congress, much as President Ford was by the 93rd Congress after Nixon resigned, and they cut all funding to Viet Nam after the war was won. People were pissed about the Marcos protection, and rightfully so. As they were pissed at Ford for pardoning Nixon, also rightfully so. Trouble is in both cases it hurt the wrong people. The Philippines was set back decades hurting people that never supported Marcos. And of coarse millions were slaughtered in Viet Nam, Laos, and Cambodia who never even knew who Jerry Ford was.

       Maybe I should reconsider my opinion of Corey Aquino.

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Seems to be a lot of anti American sentiment here nowadays

 

I'm not so sure about this.

 

Maybe my sampling is biased but my wifes large family has favorable views of the US and she also tells me the local news facebook comments sections about the Marine recently have been very pro USA.

 

I think the media just covers the negative, bad news sells.   Also, Manila is not all of the Philippines.

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Humboldt

Mt Pinatubo erupted around the same time they where trying to renew the contracts ,,

the place was a mess , maybe the US figured it was more trouble then it was worth

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I'm not so sure about this.

 

Maybe my sampling is biased but my wifes large family has favorable views of the US and she also tells me the local news facebook comments sections about the Marine recently have been very pro USA.

 

I think the media just covers the negative, bad news sells.   Also, Manila is not all of the Philippines.

 

I base my opinion on what I see and hear daily. My wife's family are pro US but the neighbors in their barangay not so much. There is hardly a day that goes by that I don't encounter some form of disdain, lack of respect, or outright BS from the locals in Dgte. My wife sees it too. Granted, the Negros Chronicle is media, but negative pieces on foreigners aren't unusual.

I've met some very gracious Filipinos but I've also ran across way too many that would rather piss on me than their favorite wall. Maybe I'm just an asshole magnet.

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smokey

Back in the day when we were caught up in the Cold War, the US and USSR played the smaller countries as they jockeyed for power. In the same fashion, the smaller countries often played the US against the Soviets for funding and support. It's how the world was at the time.

 

But, when the Soviet Union collapsed, lots of the small countries had no clue about how the game was changing. As odd as it may seem, some of the old Soviet allies did a better job of reading the changes in the wind than many American allies. Countries like Vietnam and China did well with the end of the cold war. Other countries are still trying to jerk America's chain with the 'Russians (or Chinese or Muslims or whatever) are coming' and are still locked into ineffective policies from a different era.

 

Want Subic and Clarke to be players again? Try turning one into a first class port and shipbuilding center for the region and the other into a world class airport. I suspect that will bring in one hell of a lot more pesos than beating the Russians/Chinese/Muslims are coming drum.

For who sure not the stupid american tax payers charity begins at home ,,, 

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Headshot

Humboldt, that was exactly what happened. The eruption made it so expensive to rebuild Clark and Subic that it was suddenly no longer cost efficient to stay. Besides, we had already evacuated the personnel and their dependents (with only small security forces left behind), so they would have had to complete rebuild and restaff the bases. It just no longer seemed to be worth it when the Philippine government was being so hostile toward the US. Juan Ponce Enrile, who led the Senate at that time (and still does), was one of Marcos' lieutenants during the long period of martial law (Defense Minister). I have always wondered why they didn't send him to prison as soon as Marcos was deposed. Since the Philippine army had been responsible for many of the "disappearances" during Marcos' tenure, he had to be complicit. He (with his cronies in the Senate) was the biggest roadblock to the US lease being extended. I believe he was bitter because the US had tricked Marcos into leaving the country (which we had), thus opening the way for Cory Aquino to take over as President. He had switched sides shortly before the People Power Revolution (when he saw which way the wind was blowing), but I'm not sure he ever really switched. This was only one of the many roadblocks he threw up to hinder President Aquino's effort to actually change the way the government was run in the Philippines.

Edited by Headshot
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Salty Dog

Humboldt, that was exactly what happened. The eruption made it so expensive to rebuild Clark and Subic that it was suddenly no longer cost efficient to stay. Besides, we had already evacuated the personnel and their dependents (with only small security forces left behind), so they would have had to complete rebuild and restaff the bases. It just no longer seemed to be worth it when the Philippine government was being so hostile toward the US. Juan Ponce Enrile, who led the Senate at that time (and still does), was one of Marcos' lieutenants during the long period of marshal law (Defense Minister). I have always wondered why they didn't send him to prison as soon as Marcos was deposed. Since the Philippine army had been responsible for many of the "disappearances" during Marcos' tenure, he had to be complicit. He (with his cronies in the Senate) was the biggest roadblock to the US lease being extended. I believe he was bitter because the US had tricked Marcos into leaving the country (which we had), thus opening the way for Cory Aquino to take over as President. He had switched sides shortly before the People Power Revolution (when he saw which way the wind was blowing), but I'm not sure he ever really switched. This was only one of the many roadblocks he threw up to hinder President Aquino's effort to actually change the way the government was run in the Philippines.

 

In 1991 American and Philippine officials reached a tentative agreement on a treaty that would have extended the lease on the naval base for at least another decade in exchange for $203 million in annual aid. But the Philippine Senate rejected the treaty in September 1991 after an impassioned debate in which the American military presence was assailed as a vestige of colonialism and an affront to Philippine sovereignty. 
 
The United States never increased its offer, but opened negotiations on a three-year phased withdrawal. The negotiations stumbled, over the United States' reluctance to commit itself to a firm schedule for removing troops and equipment and to guarantee that no nuclear weapons would pass through the base.
 
The Philippines gave the United States until the end of 1992 to complete withdraw from the Subic Bay naval base.
 
Juan Ponce Enrile resigned as Senate President on June 5, 2013.
Edited by Salty Dog
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I thought Marshal Law was one of the players at the OK corral?

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There is no doubt that Pinatubo was a contributary factor in the US leaving Suboc and Clark.

( I was living there at the time.)

 

There were changes in the regional politics which made the US presence there less important than i tha dbeen.

 

Newer technology meant that the US could do just as well without being in the Philippines.

 

And, of course, the Philippines engaged in their favourite sport, shooting themselves in the foot!

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Salty Dog

More like shooting themselves in the head.

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InternetTough

I always found the example of the Philippines to be useful when arguing with Koreans who liked to claim that the Republic of Korea didn't have the power to order the American military out, and so was a de facto colony of the USA. Since the Philippines had done it, I would say, then they were saying that the Filipinos had done something that they couldn't do. They didn't like to hear that, so then they might allow that South Korea was not an American colony.

 

I knew that the US military presence in South Korea had never cost the USA anything less than billions every year, and had benefited South Korea immeasurably. Primarily, it made planning aggression against South Korea far more difficult, as it was very difficult to factor in what the USA would do.

Edited by InternetTough
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