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This man was busted trying to impersonate a U.S. Marine


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Salty Dog

Actually from my point of view, Marines always seemed to get along fine with the Coast Guard. I think there was a mutual respect for each others jobs.

 

The Marines were never afraid to go into a shit storm to get the job done and the Coast Guard was never afraid to go into one to rescue others.

 

I often went to the Marine Recruit Training Center Parris Island for medical or some other issue. I was a Lieutenant (Captain) at the time. It was quite different than being around fellow Coasties. In the Coast Guard most officers below the rank of Commander (Lt Colonel) are on first name basis and rarely even salute each other if others weren't around. We would also address junior enlisted (Below E7) by their first or last name, hardly ever by their rank. Being on a Marine Base where 95% of the Marines were junior to you, was a pain in the ass. I thought my arm was going to fall off with all the saluting. Some of those drill sergeants seemed so tough that I felt that I should have been saluting them. :)

 

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SEALs are trained for different functions within the Department of the Navy than Marine units. I am fully aware of the training of Force Recon and the training is intense and probably matches that of

You got me there!  Not fair using your big Coast Guard brain to trick me.   Let's have a pushup competition huh?

We had a few platoons of Marines training among us in aviation school. They may be more physically fit but that's were their advantages stop from what I seen   I will say one thing, They were treate

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i was a door gunner on a troop carrying helicopter going high was easy falling far was hard

 

Hat's off, that was one of the most dangerous jobs in Vietnam I read (I was only 4 so I don't know personally).

 

I did know a former Marine who earned a Bronze Star with a Combat Valor for volunteering to go into a hot lz.  He took a 50 cal and assisted the door gunner, said it swayed the crap outa the helicopter.

 

But the gunners did that every day...

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Eh, I'd say you are a lawyer, you like to argue too much.

 

So I'll throw you a bone.

 

Marines are different than the other branches, they generally take much more pride in being Marines than soldiers, sailors, airmen etc...

 

As a whole, they demonstrate much more military bearing, pride, fitness, mental toughness and can do attitude.

 

There ya go, argue away, although I'm sure that many of the other branches would agree with what I said.

 

But wouldn't SEALs be a higher standard than Marines?  Do ex-SEALs call themselves SEALs?

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But wouldn't SEALs be a higher standard than Marines?

 

You do realize that the Seals are the Special Operation Branch of the Navy yes?

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smokey

Hat's off, that was one of the most dangerous jobs in Vietnam I read (I was only 4 so I don't know personally).

 

I did know a former Marine who earned a Bronze Star with a Combat Valor for volunteering to go into a hot lz.  He took a 50 cal and assisted the door gunner, said it swayed the crap outa the helicopter.

 

But the gunners did that every day...

the best time to go to viet nam was when your young before you learn what being scared is all about.. 

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the best time to go to viet nam was when your young before you learn what being scared is all about.. 

Funny thing, I was thinking about the Marine with the Bronze Star today.  He was a pilot for American Airlines, I don't remember his name, just his nickname which was his call sign - Smokey.

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JamesMusslewhite
On 22/10/2014 at 1:55 PM, BobX said:

But wouldn't SEALs be a higher standard than Marines?  Do ex-SEALs call themselves SEALs?

SEALs are trained for different functions within the Department of the Navy than Marine units. I am fully aware of the training of Force Recon and the training is intense and probably matches that of any special forces, but Recon is tasked primary to go inland in small teams or pairs to survey the terrain and gather real-time intelligence to support. We are tasked going behind the lines of the enemy most often isolated with minimum to no support. Task of Force Recon differ slightly with a focus on primarily supporting Marine expeditionary and amphibious operations. We as a rule do not go into an area hot and heavy, rather we are tasked with quietly go in and out of our assigned area unseen and unheard. We must be more like ghosts because our task is to insure nobody knows of our presence for us to be successful. You had to be strong, smart, adaptable and over all dedicated and dependable as failure can not be an option. If our INTEL is good, then if or when SEAL and Delta forces do move in than their lives are made safer and they have the proper intel to be successful at their mission.

 

I often use "ex-Marine" when referring to myself now as I am no longer active or in the reserves. This seems an acceptable term of those who were not in the Corps or had never served in any branch of the military, but the truth is the Corps never leaves us who have earned the title, it is as much a part of us as is our DNA and will remain a part of us until the day we die. We may be only half the men we once were but that is still twice the man most will ever be.

 

Celer, Silens, Mortalis" ("Swift, Silent, Deadly")

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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smokey

Funny thing, I was thinking about the Marine with the Bronze Star today.  He was a pilot for American Airlines, I don't remember his name, just his nickname which was his call sign - Smokey.

i received an award one time from a general casey dont really remember the details life at that time was confusing at best i always though of them awards as lifer material 

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Salty Dog

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But wouldn't SEALs be a higher standard than Marines?  Do ex-SEALs call themselves SEALs?

 

Actually "I'm a Seaman" would be more appropriate but I don't think they'd want to say that. 

 

 

the best time to go to viet nam was when your young before you learn what being scared is all about.. 

NSS - I turned 21 in 68 and was one of the oldest 

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straight question.  If a marine is always a marine is a sailor always a sailor and a soldier always a soldier and an airman always an airman  ?  [ I mean of course the ones who were in the military]

 

Straight answer - it's a mindset - for most other branches it's what you were in - for us it's what we are. Listen to the Jet's song from West Side Story

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it wasnt too long ago when this was perfectly legal.   enough vets and their supporters got pissed off about it a few years ago that they finally made it illegal.

Some background   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stolen_Valor_Act_of_2005

The Stolen Valor Act of 2005, signed into law by President George W. Bush on December 20, 2006,[1] was a U.S. law that broadened the provisions of previous U.S. law addressing the unauthorized wear, manufacture, or sale of any military decorations and medals. The law made it a federal misdemeanor to falsely represent oneself as having received any U.S. military decoration or medal. If convicted, defendants might have been imprisoned for up to six months, unless the decoration lied about is the Medal of Honor, in which case imprisonment could have been up to one year. In United States v. Alvarezthe U.S. Supreme Court ruled on June 28, 2012, that the Stolen Valor Act was an unconstitutional abridgment of the freedom of speech under the First Amendment, striking down the law in a 6 to 3 decision.

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stolen_Valor_Act_of_2013

 

The Stolen Valor Act of 2013  is a United States federal law that was passed by the 113th United States Congress. The law amends the federal criminal code to make it a crime for a person to fraudulently claim having received any of a series of particular military decorations with the intention of obtaining money, property, or other tangible benefit from convincing someone that he or she rightfully did receive that award. This law is a revised version of a previous one that was struck down by the Supreme Court of the United States for violating freedom of speech in the case United States v. Alvarez.

 

 

So if this guy was making money walking around wearing his uniform incorrectly off to jail he goes  - if he was not making a profit - maybe a Couple of Real Marines could teach him how to wear the uniform with respect....

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I still have my old fatigue jacket hanging in my closet. Damn thang is 40 years old and still is very wearable. They were definitely made to last... Might have to pull it out and wear it in the backyard while sitting at the firepit and drinking some cold beers. Might even still fit... :yahoo:

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Might even still fit...

 

I doubt the front expands.

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