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Update: My Rainwater Harvesting Project.


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I figured I would share something with you folks, who are not normally around concrete water jars. (A learning experience for me.)

 

City Rainwater Harvesting Project Update:
 
Until now, I had thought the large water storage jars we had at the farm were 1,050 liters each. After talking with a guy here in town (Battambang), I learned those are 1,200 liter jars, and only manufactured in provincial areas of the country, due to their size. Our landlord, who has been so helpful through our rainwater harvesting project here, had two water jars delivered for our home. They are the largest water jars manufactured in the city, at 700 liters capacity each. There are also some smaller jars available, that are 400 liters capacity. We currently have 2,200 liters of rainwater available.
 
One thing very important to do, once purchasing these water jars, no matter how old or new they are, is to fill them with water, in stages. If you do not do this, you will have a pretty loud "BANG!" outside one day - when least expecting it. That will be your water jar exploding into a million pieces and water being spilled everywhere. Yes, it does happen. How do I know this? Well, it happened to one of ours - because I filled it a bit too quickly. (Patience is definitely a good thing to have concerning filling these jars.) Follow the instructions below, to properly fill a Concrete made water jar:
 
Step 1: Fill the water jar about 1/5 to 1/4 the way up from empty. Wait three to four days.
Step 2: Fill the water jar up to about 2/3rds the way full. Wait another three or four days. 
Step 3: Fill the water jar the rest of the way full. Wait one week to ten days. 
Step 4: Drain the water jar. Clean the water jar. Refill the water jar to full.
Step 5: Begin using the water from the water jar.
 
NEVER let one of these (new) jars sit more than two days, empty of water. If you do, you will have to repeat the steps above, in order to season the jar.
 
The water has to absorb into the pores of the concrete, I suppose.
 
Second water jar being delivered:
post-1-0-35391700-1413291027.jpg
 
First water jar. The one we still have:
post-1-0-36392800-1413291114.jpg
 
Second water jar. The one that is no longer with us:
post-1-0-58367900-1413291105.jpg
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to_dave007

Those are quite attractive Paul.

 

How will you keep them from becoming mosquito nesting spots. I think about that from a dengue point of view, plus I like sitting outside in the evening.

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At the farm, we have screens affixed to the tops of the jars, as well as concrete covers over them, kind of like manhole covers.

 

Here in the city, we have a manufactured cover from tin that covers the tops of the jars. This keeps the light and mosquitoes out of the water. 


Not too costly either. 700 liter tanks are something like $16.50 USD each? 

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to_dave007

How do you get the water out with a concrete cover?

Is the rainfall fairly uniform through the year in Cambodia? In Cebu the jars would likely run empty during the dry season.. as that's what they are there for.. which means at first rain I suppose they would fill quickly and we'd have to empty the to 75% quickly after the rain or divert water from them.

 

Price is right.

 

Anyone ever see the same in Cebu?

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How do you get the water out with a concrete cover?

 

At  the moment, she just dips the water out. Typically, and as we have done at the farm, we will have holes bored through the lower wall of the jars, about four inches (10cm) from the bottom. Then, a piece of PVC pipe with a ball valve, is placed through the hole. Lastly, some concrete will be mixed up to put around the PVC pipe. After it dries, the seal will be water tight. At the farm, we have all the large tanks piped together, with ball valves at each tank, and one in between each two in line. 

 

 

 

Is the rainfall fairly uniform through the year in Cambodia?

 

We have several months of dry season, usually beginning in November, through to April. Then, from April to November is rainy season. 

 


I found a photo of a jar cover. This is on a 400 liter jar filled by the city water. There is a float inside to keep the water from overflowing the jar. From that jar, the water is gravity fed into a Mitsumi water pump which feeds our home.

 

IMG_1013r.jpg

 

IMG_1012r.jpg

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thebob

Nice use for an old suitcase.

 

I'm guessing that the jars don't have any steel in them, and thats why they burst.

 

Have you ever seen them being made? I wonder if they are turned on a giant potters wheel. How heavy are they empty?

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Davaoeno

 

 

Step 4: Drain the water jar. Clean the water jar. Refill the water jar to full.

 

 

since this is the last step I assume you can fill it all at once ?

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since this is the last step I assume you can fill it all at once ?

 

You assumed correctly. That's why I wrote, "Refill the water jar to full." :)

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I'm guessing that the jars don't have any steel in them, and thats why they burst.

 

They do have some reinforcing steel in them. I will see if I can find some of the pieces of our broken jar to take a photo of for you. 

 

 

 

 

Have you ever seen them being made?

 

Not yet. I want to reserve a day to get photos and / or video of them pouring one, though. 

 

 

 

 

How heavy are they empty?

 

Hard to say. They are not so much that one man cannot move them around, though. Two guys can handle one much easier, though. I am talking the 700 liter jars, here. The 1,200 liter jars will definitely take at LEAST two guys.

 

It was a damned sight easier dealing with the 1,500 liter stainless tank.

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