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smokey

 gee anyone need more reasons to NOT start a business              

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Top ICTSI executive confirms 'culture of corruption' at Manila ports

By Christina Mendez (philstar.com) | Updated October 16, 2014 - 5:54pm
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manila-port-area-1.jpg

MANILA, Philippines - The Senate tackled on Thursday the issue of the massive corruption at Manila’s ports that has been prevalent even among security guards, enforcers, truckers, and sub-contractors of shipping lines.

Speaking before the Senate committee on trade and commerce, International Container Terminal Services, Inc (ICTSI) president Christian Gonzalez admitted that the corruption at the ports have been there since the 1980s when the conversion rate is only P25 to a US dollar.

During that time, the regular amount for an illegal transaction would cost as much as P1,000 and the payment usually happens at the port canteen.

Gonzalez also attributed the rampant corruption to manual operations that involved the day-to-day transactions at the ports.

“This is a whole culture,” Gonzales said as he spoke about the rampant corruption that involved many people in the business of “moving containers.”

Secretary Rene Almendras, who heads the cabinet cluster on port congestion, said the administration is working on addressing the problem, worsened by the reports of corruption activities.

Headlines ( Article MRec ), pagematch: 1, sectionmatch: 1

“We are trying to solve that… I think if you’re looking something drastic, it will come… the reason for corruption is the lack of transparency,” Almendras said after the hearing.

Almendras said he has been meeting with concerned sectors to address the issue.

At the hearing, Gonzalez even discussed the reality that bribery incidents happen even at their own offices, but the ICTSI, he said, has been implementing measures to minimize “human to human” transactions to address the issue.

“And everybody is guilty here, right? If someone takes a truck into ICTSI, I guarantee you may security guard na humihingi ng pera, I guarantee that,” said Gonzalez.

He said that even as the government has started the digitalization of the port processes, bribery and mulcting practices have not been totally eradicated.

“The real problem now is the manipulation of information to create an environment where you feel you have to give money for transactions to move, when in fact, for all practical purposes is not true,” Gonzalez said.

He said the corruption goes beyond the port terminals, up to private subcontractors and shipping lines.

The ICTSI president corroborated claims by other stakeholders including those from business groups and trucker operators, that there are rampant bribery and mulcting operations in the country’s various ports.

The Senate committee on trade and commerce chaired by Sen. Bam Aquino conducted another hearing on Thursday on the disturbance of port operations that affected local businesses, importers and exporters due to the congestions in the ports of Manila.

When asked who were involved in the bribery practices, Gonzalez pointed to “private sector related to moving containers.”

“Where we can automate, we automate, right? As you saw yourself. But we cannot automate the security guard, the enforcer and the parola because you the guy with the gun,” Gonzalez added.

Melissa Chua, of the Federation of Filipino Chambers of Commerce and Industry, previously told the Senate committee that “under the table” deals have been happening at the ports for a long time.

“Before it started only with the truckers...Pakikisama, pangmerienda maybe for P100,” said Chua, who encouraged the truckers groups to encourage the concerned sectors to speak up during the hearing.

“But now people are taking advantage of it because they know the frustration of how hard it is to return the empties so even though you have the pre-alert advise and if you don’t have the under the table, they wont accept your empties. So you are forced to give it to them,” Chua said

Edited by smokey
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Why is it no matter what the subject or how off the wall something is here in the Philippines, someone always has to jump in and say "Well it's that way or worse in the USA"?   What does the US have

Wait, I can hear it coming. There will be a new law passed that prohibits corruption. Yup, that will fix the problem

I know what they can do - since hammers were used in smash and grab robberies in malls they banned hammers.    So just ban money. No more bribes! 

rainymike

True, but done in the finest traditions of America's longshoremen unions and harbor regulatory authorities. Didn't stop progress in America. Shouldn't stop progress here either. 

 

LOL ... still resisting offers that I'm not supposed to refuse.

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Monsoon

Even the Air 21 guy lingers around and hints for a tip whenever he delivers something here. 

 

"Oh Im rushing so hard and late to bring this to you..." 

 

Meh, you could have brought it tomorrow. 

 

And lingers and lingers and lingers... But the moment 20 pesos hits his hand - boom out the door faster than children when the school bell rings.

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contraman

So it has been admitted that thete is corruption on the wharfs.

But I don't see anywhere what they are going to do to stop it.

More same ol same ol :(

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It will get stopped when someone gets greedy enough that they stop passing money on UP to some who don't even realize that the Phils are islands... they think THEY are an island entitled to reap from all the various "crops".

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Monsoon

I know what they can do - since hammers were used in smash and grab robberies in malls they banned hammers. 

 

So just ban money. No more bribes! 

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contraman

Wait, I can hear it coming.

There will be a new law passed that prohibits corruption.

Yup, that will fix the problem :)

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InternetTough
Speaking before the Senate committee on trade and commerce, International Container Terminal Services, Inc (ICTSI) president Christian Gonzalez admitted that the corruption at the ports have been there since the 1980s when the conversion rate is only P25 to a US dollar.

 

I remember reading about the Philippines back in about 1982 that one of the problems with the ports in the Philippines was that the aurhorities wouldn't STAY bribed. They were always breaking the (illegal) contract and coming back for more. This is an older problem than the 1980s, I think.

Edited by InternetTough
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Mikala
This is an older problem than the 1980s, I think.

 

Maybe back to the 1580s??? Funny how the report wants us to believe corruption is a fairly recent invention.  :snap:

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contraman

SOME 100,000 empty containers still need to be removed from the Manila ports to ease congestion at the country's container ports.

 

Cabinet Secretary Jose Rene Almendras said the government and the private sector are making ways to dispatch empty containers currently clogging the Manila ports.

Problem now is dealing with empty containers, 80,000 to 100,000 empty containers are in the country today," he said Thursday in a Senate hearing on port congestion.

Alyansa Agrikultura president Ernesto Ordonez said the port congestion is not yet over and the shipping lines should be accountable in clearing the containers."

The main problem is the empties and the shipping line should take responsibility," Ordonez said as he urged the government to take immediate response to solve the problem.

 

Source:

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/manila/local-news/2014/10/16/empty-containers-be-removed-manila-ports-371337

Another case of

"It's someone else's fault" :(

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i wonder how cheap you can buy the containers for ? use them to build container homes...

Edited by DeRail
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duncan1958

i wonder how cheap you can buy the containers for ? use them to build container homes...

I was thinking the very same thing
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SOME 100,000 empty containers still need to be removed from the Manila ports to ease congestion at the country's container ports.

 

Cabinet Secretary Jose Rene Almendras said the government and the private sector are making ways to dispatch empty containers currently clogging the Manila ports.

Problem now is dealing with empty containers, 80,000 to 100,000 empty containers are in the country today," he said Thursday in a Senate hearing on port congestion.

Alyansa Agrikultura president Ernesto Ordonez said the port congestion is not yet over and the shipping lines should be accountable in clearing the containers."

The main problem is the empties and the shipping line should take responsibility," Ordonez said as he urged the government to take immediate response to solve the problem.

 

Source:

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/manila/local-news/2014/10/16/empty-containers-be-removed-manila-ports-371337

Another case of

"It's someone else's fault" :(

Instant housing in typhoon stricken areas...what's the problem?

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contraman

Maybe they are trained by the RTP or vice versa ?

Note this obviously well to do motorist parking in a No Parking Zone

But Its Okay, He is being guided by an official :)

index.jpeg

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contraman

This is from a Website run by a Filipino

 

 

 

Corruption-in-the-Philippines.jpg

One of the biggest social ills our country has continued to face since time immemorial is the issue of corruption. 

Let’s face it, our “culture of corruption” is embedded deep within our system and reinforced by a complex web of

economic and social factors which include personal ambitions and a twisted sense of loyalty to friends and kin.

The Philippines is in for a long haul if our officials and we ourselves do not get rid of this very negative habit.

 

 

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