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I was sitting in the barber shop the other day, along with a professor which teaches at Western Oregon University.  He told his students that President Regan gave black people AIDS. 

 

It's pure crap coming out of Universities these days.  What will it be like when I send my kids to college?   Will there be conservative schools still?

 

If I were raising children in the US today, there seems to be only one answer - HOME SCHOOLING. At least we would know exactly what our children are learning. 

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TheMatrix

If I were raising children in the US today, there seems to be only one answer - HOME SCHOOLING. At least we would know exactly what our children are learning. 

 

Yup, and I've already got that planned.  Ron Paul has developed an excellent home school curriculum for K-12, and there's plenty of conservative schools in this area.  It's higher education I'm concerned with.

http://www.ronpaulcurriculum.com/

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/09/10/ron-paul-launches-k-12-homeschooling-curriculum-focusing-on-liberty-and-self-discipline/

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Majorsco

 

 

Will there be conservative schools still?

 

They are practically extinct now.

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MattFromGA

If I were raising children in the US today, there seems to be only one answer - HOME SCHOOLING. At least we would know exactly what our children are learning. 

Home schooling your children well takes dedication, otherwise they don't get a good education.  The places being described here are not like that in most areas in Georgia.  I am deeply involved with all my kids school and they dont even follow the Obama lunch program which has good intentions but is total BS.  Rather than focus on calories they need to focus on P.E., which they don't do like they should.  That can easily be solved with a Total Gym at home.

Edited by MattFromGA
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Headshot

Yup, and I've already got that planned.  Ron Paul has developed an excellent home school curriculum for K-12, and there's plenty of conservative schools in this area.  It's higher education I'm concerned with.

http://www.ronpaulcurriculum.com/

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/09/10/ron-paul-launches-k-12-homeschooling-curriculum-focusing-on-liberty-and-self-discipline/

 

Thanks Steve. I reviewed some of the lessons in the Ron Paul Curriculum. I like the methods they use. Our daughter is in nursery school here, and they are learning to read and write, but everything is done by rote...memorize, memorize, memorize. She is extremely smart, but she is ADHD, and memorization is really hard on an ADHD kid (I know because I was one...even though back then they didn't know what ADHD was when I was a kid). She is having a hard time forming some of the letters (writing), and after reviewing the first lesson in the phonics section, and now I understand why she is struggling. She wasn't taught the basics (like where to start a circle and why). My wife and I tutor her at home in addition to her hours in school, so I would like to use these lessons to supplement what she is learning at school. Maybe we can make learning more interesting for her.

 

BTW, she isn't doing poorly in school. She is right at the top of her class, and she knows her ABC's (including recognition, sounding out and writing both upper case and lower case) and knows (and writes) her numbers. However, her fine motor skills aren't really there yet, so sometimes her letters and numbers become quite distorted. I am really surprised at how secretive the schools are here. Most of the students' schoolwork is done on work sheets, which the parents never see. All we see is what they do in their workbooks. Getting information out of the teachers on how she's doing or where she needs help (other than the short parent-teacher conference when they give the parents the report cards). Our biggest frustrations come from trying to use their methods for teaching her in a home setting.

 

Now, I will split these posts to give them their own thread, since they are off-topic.

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Bill H

If I were raising children in the US today, there seems to be only one answer - HOME SCHOOLING. At least we would know exactly what our children are learning. 

 

I definately agree, but increasingly Officialdom is trying to stop home schooling.  I guess the system is afraid of a group of kids who have not been indoctrinated in Liberal think, who have the ability to reason, and can actually do subtraction, 

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Majorsco

I definately agree, but increasingly Officialdom is trying to stop home schooling. I guess the system is afraid of a group of kids who have not been indoctrinated in Liberal think, who have the ability to reason, and can actually do subtraction,

I agree but don't forget all that revenue the public schools don't get because the student isn't enrolled there.

 

It's both.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Bill H

I agree but don't forget all that revenue the public schools don't get because the student isn't enrolled there.

 

It's both.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Sure they loose revenue, but so what?  If they were actually educating kids instead of indoctrinating them, people would be less inclined to keep their kids out of the public school system.

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Majorsco

Sure they loose revenue, but so what?  If they were actually educating kids instead of indoctrinating them, people would be less inclined to keep their kids out of the public school system.

They want their competition for the money to be gone, as a reason to oppose home schooling.  I think it's both reasons, but more about the money.  Money talks.

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TheMatrix

Thanks Steve. I reviewed some of the lessons in the Ron Paul Curriculum. I like the methods they use. Our daughter is in nursery school here, and they are learning to read and write, but everything is done by rote...memorize, memorize, memorize. She is extremely smart, but she is ADHD, and memorization is really hard on an ADHD kid (I know because I was one...even though back then they didn't know what ADHD was when I was a kid). She is having a hard time forming some of the letters (writing), and after reviewing the first lesson in the phonics section, and now I understand why she is struggling. She wasn't taught the basics (like where to start a circle and why). My wife and I tutor her at home in addition to her hours in school, so I would like to use these lessons to supplement what she is learning at school. Maybe we can make learning more interesting for her.

 

BTW, she isn't doing poorly in school. She is right at the top of her class, and she knows her ABC's (including recognition, sounding out and writing both upper case and lower case) and knows (and writes) her numbers. However, her fine motor skills aren't really there yet, so sometimes her letters and numbers become quite distorted. I am really surprised at how secretive the schools are here. Most of the students' schoolwork is done on work sheets, which the parents never see. All we see is what they do in their workbooks. Getting information out of the teachers on how she's doing or where she needs help (other than the short parent-teacher conference when they give the parents the report cards). Our biggest frustrations come from trying to use their methods for teaching her in a home setting.

 

Now, I will split these posts to give them their own thread, since they are off-topic.

 

Excellent.  I applaud you for taking an active role in your children's education.  So many parents these days, send their kids to school without a clue at what is really going on or being taught.  I am a firm believer that a child should be educated at home regardless if they are home-schooled or not.  Going to a brick and mortar school should be for supplemental education, reaffirming what was learned at home, and building of social skills such as teamwork.  

 

I really like the Ron Paul curriculum as its geared toward freedom loving conservatives and their values, how Christianity played an important role in the founding of this country, true market economics (not handouts), etc etc.  It teaches to think outside the box, independence in thinking for oneself, true core skills in succeeding in today's environment, not rote memorization on everything, but the important "Why".  Further, the Ron Paul curriculum t's very inexpensive!  I think the first year(s) are actually free.

 

Bottom line:  I think the best way to raise kids is spending "Time" with them, lots of time.  Being involved in every facet of their lives, and making them part of your daily chores is key.  If you have secure kids, you have confident kids.  Confident kids learn more easily.  My little boy, now 19 months old, does everything with me on the farm, whether I'm digging a ditch or cleaning the chicken coop.  He's always there by my side chatting together.  (he's actually closer to me than momma, heehee).

 

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Laurence

http://www.rte.ie/news/2014/0903/641129-monica-o-connor/

 

We've had some media discussion about this recently.

There was also an interview on radio of two brothers, now in university, who were home schooled. They came across as two very well rounded individuals, well able to talk on national radio and very self assured. Sorry that I don't have a link.

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  • 2 weeks later...
rainymike

I like the idea of home schooling, but doing education completely through home schooling is a hard road for one kid - and even steeper with several kids in tow. Even a retired guy like me finds it daunting.

 

I prefer the idea of 'gap' home schooling. I monitor my kids education carefully and step in where appropriate. I don't try to duplicate things. But where there are gaps in their learning, I step in. Whether those gaps are skills, values, facts, whatever. 

 

We all have different priorities about what should be taught or how it should be taught. I don't have a problem with certain methodologies. And, I don't find memorization of stuff entirely bad. It's a question of how the memorization is used. Basic arithmetic lends itself well to drill and practice and memorization.

 

I find the schoolbooks more than adequately cover the underlying concepts for math or other subjects. But the catch for me is that the kids have a hard time reading on their own because the emphasis is on test performance. So for me, drill and practice and memorization has its place but needs a little extra.

 

I also want the kids to read and figure out things for themselves. But with so much to cover - English, Tagalog, Civica (social studies), MAPE (music/art/PE), 'Values', and Math it's easy to get carried away with just focusing on exam performance. Then, pile on other crap like foundation week and teachers, parents and students really are falling behind.

 

I kind of let school and my partner and occasional tutors take care of the basic curriculum. It's not that it's bad, it's just that it is not enough (in my mind). My role is bringing in extracurricular stuff that kids will enjoy getting involved with. My third grader is not a real go-getter when it comes to studying pronouns, but he loves to read stuff about animals. That's my job - bringing those kinds of resources to bear and trying to point them in additional directions - to develop reading and thinking skills and their knowledge base. 

 

For example, he'll pick up reading material about volcanoes that are advanced reading for his age. And we can have a decent discussion about that. That's my job now - librarian, blogger, dinner discussion dad. He likes dinosaurs so I'm gathering up materials on that. I find this approach more manageable and fun for me. We attend to the basic curriculum and I fill in the necessary gaps.

 

It works really well with the 3 year old. I use Youtube for her. Lots of fun and interesting stuff for her there. And I pair her up with the 6 year old on assignments she can handle - like learning a nursery rhyme or listening to a story - or coloring a book. She enjoys following her big brothers. The older kids help 'pull' her ahead.

 

Anyway, just my opinion. I like the idea of homeschooling, but find doing complete curricula to be too much work and rather tedious for me. I am comfortable working with the school's curricula and positioning myself to step in to fill the gaps. And I try to develop the kids' skills by allowing them to pursue their interests beyond what's covered in school. Once their interests take off, it's easier to steer them into directions that I would like to emphasize. Although I haven't quite figured out how to do it yet, gaming (academic games) is another tool I want to bring to bear.

 

In short, the school want the kids to know the difference between similes and metaphors. Fine, I'll play along. My partner/tutor/school can do all the drill and practice they want. My job is to help the kids read and grasp what similes and metaphors are just by reading things they want to read. My three year old can use the concept of a figure of speech even if she is utterly clueless about similes and metaphors.

 

Next year though, I'm checking out a couple of Montessori schools nearby. And I'm sending them to summer session. Except I'll be asking their tutors to forget the curriculum and exams and focus on reading and thinking skills.

 

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angbumabasa

I agree but don't forget all that revenue the public schools don't get because the student isn't enrolled there.

 

It's both.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Hell. Katrina took 40% of our students away, along with the $. Neither ever came back. The next year education got better because it became more focused on EDUCATION. 

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thebob

Yup, and I've already got that planned.  Ron Paul has developed an excellent home school curriculum for K-12, and there's plenty of conservative schools in this area.  It's higher education I'm concerned with.

http://www.ronpaulcurriculum.com/

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/09/10/ron-paul-launches-k-12-homeschooling-curriculum-focusing-on-liberty-and-self-discipline/

 

I've just looked at that Ron Paul page and it is abysmal. For example the page discussing common core. http://www.ronpaulcurriculum.com/public/4506.cfm

 

"Common Core math for children is a reincarnation of the failed "New Math" experiment of the late 1960's. The goal is the same: to baffle parents who understand math.

If parents cannot understand how to teach math this way, then they are tempted to turn all teaching over to classroom teachers in tax-funded schools. The parents give up.

This is the #1 goal of Common Core math: to get parents to give up and butt out. It was the #1 goal of New Math, too.

The New Math experiment failed because the elementary school teachers could not understand it. It separated them from the teaching process. Common Core will have the same effect. Trust me."

 

This is exactly the problem with home schooling. He doesn't realise that the "so called" New Math, far from being a failed experiment, led directly to the digital revolution that we are experiencing today. Just because he doesn't understand it, doesn't mean that the young people won't need it later on in life.

 

Teaching skills that were only relevant 50 years ago, will not prepare students for the modern world. If parents can't understand the latest math teaching techniques, it isn't surprising because their generation are the ones who scored so abysmally in math skills when gauged by international standards.

 

And this is just one subject. Curriculum development is just one aspect, lesson planning and materials development generally take longer than teaching the actual lessons. So for each child you want to teach for 8 hours a day, you need another 8 hours minimum for preparation.

 

I can understand that some religions wouldn't want their children to be exposed to a balanced learning environment, but to paint education with a political brush seems like the desperation of some kind of fundamentalism.

 

By all means supplement education, but kids need the social skills that the classroom imparts.

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thebob

I've just found some more information about Dr. Gary North, the director of curriculum development for RonPaulCurriculum.com

 

 

Gary North: The Christian Taliban Writing Ron Paul’s Curriculum

 

Let this serve as a warning to the libertarian and Christian homeschooling communities: Gary North, the man who is writing and publishing the “Ron Paul Curriculum,” is certifiably nuts. North subscribes to an ultra-ultra-fundamentalist religious ideology called “Christian Reconstructionism,” which aspires to establish a global Christian theocracy and reinstitute all of Old Testament law. I am not exaggerating.

 

North, who has been lurking around the fringes of the libertarian community for decades, has reemerged from his cave to pen a homeschooling curriculum under Ron Paul’s name, based “first and foremost” on “biblical principles.” (Tom Woods, who has done some writing for Dr. Paul before, is also involved in the project.)

 

Paul’s involvement in the project appears to be minimal, and statements allegedly from him on the curriculum site are written in the style and voice of Gary North (peppered with transparently self-conscious first-person references to remind the reader that this is really Paul, not North, speaking). The site itself appears to be modeled, if not an actual clone, of North’s own subscription website. For instance, “Ron Paul’s” 100% guarantee reads a lot like North’s own, and the domain RonPaulCurriculum.com was first registered in 2010 to “GaryNorth.com, Inc.” The fee for the curriculum is $25 to start, $250 a year after that, plus $50 per course. (I notice that for all the grousing about “worthless FRNs,” he still expects to be paid in dollars.)

 

While none of this is wrong in itself (high-profile people often lend their names to their friends’ projects–and it isNorth’s project), parents should be concerned about about Gary North, and what his agenda is in educating their children. North has been quite explicit about this in the past, and he laid out his ultimate goals in an article in Christianity and Civilization, which you can find on his website:

 

"Everyone talks about religious liberty, but no one believes it. So let us be blunt about it: we must use the doctrine of religious liberty to gain independence for Christian schools until we train up a generation of people who know that there is no religious neutrality, no neutral law, no neutral education, and no neutral civil government. Then they will get busy in constructing a Bible-based social, political, and religious order which finally denies the religious liberty of the enemies of God."

 

North wrote this totalitarian screed in 1982, but, as he said then, he’s playing the long game: “It will take time. A minority religion cannot do this. Theocracy must flow from the hearts of a majority of citizens.” Although he despises the notion of religious liberty, he accepts its use as a strategic deception (“As a tactic, it is legitimate; we are jockeying for power. We are buying time”) until he and his fellow Reconstructionists are in a position to seize power and destroy the “enemies of God.”

 

http://blog.skepticallibertarian.com/2013/04/08/gary-north-the-libertarian-taliban/

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