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21 months to prepare for new high school levels (Sep 7, 2014)


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Oasis Monarch

 

CEBU CITY - Cebu Province will need at least 593 new classrooms and 1,100 additional teachers for the senior high school levels, which will be implemented in June 2016.

In less than two years, the Department of Education (DepEd) will have to be ready for the 37,000 students expected to enroll in senior high school or Grades 11 and 12.

Dr. Isaias Wagas, DepEd private schools coordinator and a member of the preparation team for senior high school, said the agency has yet to determine how many laboratories are needed.

Wagas said the estimated number of teachers needed and projected number of students who will enroll are based on the existing 219 high schools in the province.

The senior high school or Grades 11 and 12 are part of DepEd’s K to 12 curriculum, which is intended to bring basic education in the Philippines at par with international standards.

In Mandaue City, for example, public high schools need to build at least 159 classrooms in the next two years for the senior high school.

At least 218 teachers also need to be hired to teach Grade 11 and 12 students, according to the Department of Education (DepEd) Mandaue City Division.

Apart from classrooms and teachers, schools also need more laboratories and shop equipment.

Dr. Fay Luarez of DepEd Mandaue said an initial P20 million is needed to put up more laboratories and equipment for technical and vocational courses.

An estimated 3,400 students in public schools and 2,100 students in private schools will enter Grade 11 in 2016 in Mandaue City.

Books, assistance

In northern Cebu, the Consolacion National High School (CNHS) estimated it will need P70 million for additional classrooms, laboratories, equipment and compensation for new teachers.

The school has 2,200 students.

CNHS Principal Adelina Semblante said that currently, one junior high school class is attending lectures in their school gym, while six other classes are in the CNHS Laray extension in Sitio Laray, Barangay Nangka.

“The main campus is just enough for the junior high school students,” Semblante said. CNHS has 500 students in fourth year or Grade 10.

Semblante said the school can’t afford to depend entirely on DepEd and will have to ask for help from the local government, the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corp. or organizations like the Aboitiz Foundation.

One of the school’s problems is the lack of textbooks.

Estrellita Quiamco, a grade 10 Physics teacher, said teachers will need to look for more academic sources for their lessons because they only have modules from DepEd.

“We have not received books like those in private schools,” Quiamco said. They sometimes use their Science Club funds so that they can buy books as additional references for their lessons.

Mandaue plans

Luarez--DepEd Mandaue’s program supervisor for Technology and Livelihood Education and for Technical and Vocational Education (TVE)--said that all public schools are now doing strategic planning for their implementation of senior high school.

She said the division can only estimate the amount needed by the division for the implementation of senior high school when all the schools have finished their plans.

Although DepEd assures parents that graduates of the new curriculum will have more job opportunities, some remain unconvinced.

Marlet Ancot, a 47-year-old food vendor, said she worries that her children may lose their interest in pursuing higher education after they graduate from senior high school.

Two of her three children are studying under the new curriculum.

“Di gyud ko kauyon ana. Dugang sa gasto (I don’t support it. It adds to our school expenses),” she told Sun.Star Cebu Saturday.

Shortage

The city’s biggest high school, the Mandaue City Comprehensive National High School, needs more classrooms and laboratories for the senior high school.

Principal Reina Perez said the school has almost 700 students in Grade 9 who will proceed to Grade 11 two years from now.

But more may enroll in their Grade 11 if smaller schools could not open their own senior high school.

“We lack classrooms now. How much more when we implement the senior high school?” Perez said in an interview with Sun.Star Cebu.

But she said DepEd and other concerned government agencies have promised this shortage in facilities will be addressed before the start of the school year.

Private institutions have also expressed their intention to work with the school.

Perez said the school and the University of Cebu-Banilad Campus recently signed a memorandum of understanding to offer a course on graphic arts next year.

Partnerships

“It will be a pilot course for our senior high school,” she said.

Their target is to accept 40 enrollees from the school’s fourth year high school students.

Perez said the University of San Carlos and the AMA Computer Learning Center have also expressed interest to partner with the school.

The MCCNHS has 3,500 students and 130 teachers.

Because of the lack of classrooms, Perez said they have to implement shifting of classes.

The City recently inaugurated a 15-classroom building in the school.

“We have no problem with skilled teachers. Our problem is the lack of classrooms and facilities,” she said.

Angelina Matbagon, who teaches technical and vocational skills at MCCNHS, said their school may have to make fewer adjustments to the new curriculum because they have been implementing TVE for years, but the school’s lack of laboratories and equipment remains a challenge.

College dreams

The school offers eight TVE courses, including cosmetology, masonry, welding, commercial cooking and computer hardware servicing.

Proponents of the K to 12 curriculum believe that it will address youth unemployment because students will be of legal age by the time they graduate and have earned a certificate for employment.

Hazel May Baguio, 16, a Grade 9 student of MCCNHS, said she supports the new curriculum because it gives future graduates like her more job opportunities.

“With senior high school, I can get an NC II (National Certificate) without studying at Tesda,” she told Sun.Star Cebu.

Tesda, which stands for the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority, gives the certificate to graduates of its technical and vocational courses.

Grade 9 students Joylyn Ibona and Maria Divina Siacor of the Consolacion National High School illustrate some of the uncertainties that upcoming senior high students now face.

Ibona said she does not know if she can still afford to pursue her studies, with two high school years added, because her seven siblings are all still in school.

Siacor said she knows the positive goal of the K to 12 curriculum, but worries about the additional expenses, especially if the students would still need to photocopy lessons from their teacher’s books.

Jean Bulalaque, 14, a Grade 9 pupil of MCCNHS, said the senior high school delays her plan to get a college degree. She plans to take up tourism in college. “Dugang sad sa gasto (It also adds to our expenses),” she said

 

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/local-news/2014/09/07/21-months-prepare-new-high-school-levels-364098

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Headshot

With the overcrowding that already exists in the schools, they should just build a new high school in every area where there is presently a school. Then, reduce elementary to K-5 which will increase the number of classrooms per grade), create a middle school for grades 6-8 (in the old high schools...again increasing the classrooms available per grade), and put grades 9-12 in the new high schools (which are hopefully built with enough classrooms to accommodate future growth in the student population). That will cause the least amount of disturbance in the existing schools during construction (most of which don't have any room for expansion anyway). However, they need to begin construction NOW if they want to have any hope that the schools will be ready for occupancy by June 2016! My guess, though, is that the DEPED people are still just scratching their heads trying to figure out how they will fit the extra grades into the same number of classrooms they have now (which means they don't even have a plan yet).

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I always thought this change, though a very good idea on educational grounds, was a train crash waiting to happen.  When it was announced the first thing I said to my wife was "And so what's going happen to the universities for two years when they find they have virtually no student intake?" Well, that realization took a while to materialize but now some local universities in Cebu are talking about shifting teachers down to the senior high school level and downsizing and removing some of the deadwood.  One option to deal with the classroom problem in the short term is to rent the under-utilized university space and teach senior high school students on the university campuses.  The labs and other facilities are presumably already in place.  In 2017-2018 the universities will have only two cohorts still taking classes (2014-15 and 2015-16 intakes) - I assume these are all four year bachelors programmes.  That should leave plenty of spare capacity.  The privately funded universities are going to take a big hit in 2016-18 with an enormous drop in tuition income.  It will take years for the high school and university systems to stabilize after the change in terms of both infrastructure and human resources.

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Headshot

One option to deal with the classroom problem in the short term is to rent the under-utilized university space and teach senior high school students on the university campuses.  

 

That might help for a few of the high schools that are actually close to universities, but there are a lot more high schools (and students) than there are universities (and space). Even in areas where that might work, moving high school students into college classrooms would really only postpone the problem, since after a couple of years the universities would need their space back and you would still need new high schools. Also, a lot of students here don't start university right out of high school (they try to earn money for tuition), so there will still be at least some freshmen admissions during the lean years immediately following implementation. It would be a good time for the universities to redesign their curriculums (and raise the bar), since they will no longer have to teach what most countries would consider high school level courses.

 

 

It will take years for the high school and university systems to stabilize after the change in terms of both infrastructure and human resources.

 

That is true, and I would add that it will also take years to restructure the curriculums at both the high school and university levels.

Edited by Headshot
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One glaring note in the news article was that the shortage of funds which they Hoped to make up DID NOT INCLUDE text books....I guess text books aren't important in education.  A train wreck??? more like Yolanda rehitting and staying...I believe the anachronism is FUBAR 

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  • 4 weeks later...
rainymike

 

 

That is true, and I would add that it will also take years to restructure the curriculums at both the high school and university levels.

 

Agree. Am running into this problem even at the elementary levels. Good ideas, but execution leaves much to be desired.

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USMC-Retired

They took millions and millions of dollars in international aid to make this a reality. This was suppose to phase in over 5 years and end in 2013. They asked for a three extension which was granted. There are no more extensions in an 8 year progress with the PH promising yet failing to deliver.

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One glaring note in the news article was that the shortage of funds which they Hoped to make up DID NOT INCLUDE text books....I guess text books aren't important in education.  A train wreck??? more like Yolanda rehitting and staying...I believe the anachronism is FUBAR 

They often have only one textbook per classroom now.

 

What I think is a step in the right direction is part of those two new grade levels focuses (allegedly) on actual livelihood skills.

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What I think is a step in the right direction is part of those two new grade levels focuses (allegedly) on actual livelihood skills.

 

Nice! I continually try to convince my friends that volleyball, dancing, singing, being in a parade, copy/paste out of Wikipedia and being in a beauty pageant do not provide skills that will help them in the job market.

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Headshot

Nice! I continually try to convince my friends that volleyball, dancing, singing, being in a parade, copy/paste out of Wikipedia and being in a beauty pageant do not provide skills that will help them in the job market.

 

I think it depends on which job market they are shooting for. If they want to be a Showtime performer (or if that doesn't work out an exotic dancer / GRO) then those skills will serve them well.

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I always thought this change, though a very good idea on educational grounds, was a train crash waiting to happen.  When it was announced the first thing I said to my wife was "And so what's going happen to the universities for two years when they find they have virtually no student intake?" Well, that realization took a while to materialize but now some local universities in Cebu are talking about shifting teachers down to the senior high school level and downsizing and removing some of the deadwood.  One option to deal with the classroom problem in the short term is to rent the under-utilized university space and teach senior high school students on the university campuses.  The labs and other facilities are presumably already in place.  In 2017-2018 the universities will have only two cohorts still taking classes (2014-15 and 2015-16 intakes) - I assume these are all four year bachelors programmes.  That should leave plenty of spare capacity.  The privately funded universities are going to take a big hit in 2016-18 with an enormous drop in tuition income.  It will take years for the high school and university systems to stabilize after the change in terms of both infrastructure and human resources.

 

Your idea has merit despite Headshot's doubt. However the universities will require reimbursement for use of their facilities. I fear however that the 'problem' will only be realised when the situation is manifest.

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goggleye

At the same time colleges and universities don't know what to do with the shortage of students for a couple of years while they are finishing those two years of high school

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