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quit_yume

How Difficult to Buy an Offshore Fishing Boat in Philippines?

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CaptRonn

This is not like the US.  Marinas here are very expensive.  Bringing a big boat here can be a nightmare.

 

As far as buying a boat here, there is lots of junk, and it is over priced

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Look here...

 

http://www.sailfishbaysurfandfishing.com/

 

Mark, the owner of Sailfish Bay Fishing Charters on Siargao is a LinC Forums member and advertises here on LinC Forums. He could probably answer your questions better than anyone else on the forums, since he is doing it now.

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Bill H

It has become almost impossible to get the high quality marine plywood you need to build boats here.  I've looked at building in steel, but steel prices are outrageous and for some reason locals don't like the idea of having steel boats here.  You can build out of timber as someone mentioned earlier, but it's very hard to get decent wood, and it's all green.  Very few kilns here to dry your wood, but the locals build with green.  Wood borers are nightmarish in these waters and if your boat is very large finding a place to haul it to do the bottom is problematic.  What a wood borer can do to your nicely planked hull in a year will make you cry.

 

You can get fiberglass and resin, but the price is almost double.   The locals all use truck engines which are not marinized with truck transmissions.  Prop shafts are almost never supported, so they have to be more than twice the size of what you would use in the North America or Europe.  Most props are made by a guy working out of his garage.  He sells them by diameter and has no clue what pitch means.  He just copies what he has always used and that has to be good enough.

 

Stuffing boxes are typically not used here, so there is always water leaking around the shaft as it passes through the hull.  No problem, just bail a lot.  All in all, buying a locally built boat is risky at best.  Local plywood will delaminate.  In my testing of local plywood it regularly fails in two hours or less, which is extraordinarily poor.  Normally you would expect it to go at least 72 hours or more.  If you do purchase a wood boat here, expect the resale value to be very low.  If you take it to another country maybe lower.  Wooden boats have lost most of their appeal due to the high maintenance costs.

 

The one thing I have not seen here that might be worth a try is ferro-cement.  This is a very labor intensive way to build a boat, but labor is the one thing that costs the least here.  Getting the correct mesh might be a challenge, but it can be purchased in China, not sure how much duty would be since it's called bird netting in most places.  They do have the correct cement, but getting good sand would be a bit of a struggle I fear.  That said, all the other things that make a boat a boat are difficult to get here and very, very expensive when you find them.

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spritsail

This is our ew boat for the hotl 32 ft Yamaha hull with 50hp outboard. Nice boat for angling parties and dive parties to Mantigue island, Camiguin.

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post-7590-0-37363200-1410084883_thumb.jpg

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big RB

        A partner and I owned a commercial fishing boat that was moored in Bodega Bay California for a few years. The 42 foot trawler, with an 8 ton live well hole was built in 1958, and had a single 4 cylinder gray marine diesel engine. It developed a cruising speed of about 8 knots on average, slower in rough seas. We were licensed and equipped for crab (Dungeness) and salmon. The two seasons never overlap, and are very short, so we were able to do this on our vacation/leave time from our regular jobs. We also spent a lot of our days off on boat and gear maintenance and repairs. Plus we built our own crab traps in my partner's garage, that retailed back then for over $100 each (counting rope and buoy). This was the early 1990's, so I am sure the price has gone up.  

       Here in the Philippines I found fishing to be so much different it is like another planet. For one, the social status of fishermen here is very low, not at all the case in California. The marina where our slip was, belonged to Sonoma County, and it is a tourist destination drawing many with cameras every week end that weather is good. So we were treated well, even by the yacht crowed who tied up on the same pier. We paid $600 a year for our slip, a big yacht owner told me he was paying $1,200 for a week. (We were on his boat as guest using his hot tub, after a day of sanding, scraping and painting on our boat). I doubt the yachters here treat fishermen so well. Then as the fishermen go there is the traditional way and the high tech way. In the US when high tech is better, it is soon the new tradition. Example, GPS navigation is so useful that you will not find a crab boat without it. We had it, and radar. You save time and fuel as it allows you to find your pots (gear) with pinpoint accuracy, not cruising back and forth looking for it. In fact it is so accurate the big problem is to not run over your own buoys (pot lines) in the fog. Auto pilot replaces a hand too. Here not so much.

        At least here in the provinces fishing is pretty much treated as a native craft and runs mostly unregulated paying only fees and taxes as a business. I never saw any version of anything like the California Fish and Game that meet your boat at the market in California, or the US Coast Guard that patrol the waters over there. Most fishermen here do not have radios!

       So the yachts/fishing boats here are separated by class. As in the rest of society here, there is not a lot of middle class, either fishing or yachting. Charter boats seem to be rare and not as popular as I would think they should be. Not at all like the Caribbean islands, despite similar conditions. Do we even got a party boat working out of Dumaguete? The taxes and fees might be the problem for them, I do not know.    

Edited by big RB
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