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How practical is solar power for PH home owners?


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I'd like to hear from someone on the forum that is actually doing this.

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I'd like to hear from someone on the forum that is actually doing this.

 

Can you be a bit more specific? Doing what, specifically? 

 

I run solar power here in Cambodia. I do so, because mains electric is not available within 5 kilometers of the farm. 

I have a small array here at the house, because our power is not reliable. If you can imagine, it is MORE UNRELIABLE, than in the Philippines. 

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Can you be a bit more specific? Doing what, specifically?

 

I run solar power here in Cambodia. I do so, because mains electric is not available within 5 kilometers of the farm.

I have a small array here at the house, because our power is not reliable. If you can imagine, it is MORE UNRELIABLE, than in the Philippines.

Using solar for electricity for their homes on or off the grid- in The Philippines. Edited by tomaw
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USCebuana

I worked on a LEED Gold building project a few years ago. The building's energy consumption if I remember correctly was about 10-20% below Title 24 requirements in California. The first thing that was considered was the orientation of the building in relation to the sun, prevailing winds, etc. Then the building envelope, space lay-out, openings etc. were determined to minimize energy usage of the HVAC. They ran several scenarios with the different lay-outs to see which one gets you the least consumption. Furthermore, I remember we changed into water cooled AC systems, did passive air circulation measures and utilized daylighting methods etc.. The point is you can do so much to lower your electric consumption without an expensive pv system especially for a house. The project did have a pv system array that generates about 84 kw for building use and another array system on the roof that was leased by the utility company that generated about 102 kw that feeds directly to the grid.

 

The guys energy bill was quite high for a 3 bedroom house maybe he needs to consider energy saving measures first. I doubt majority of Pinoys can afford that system. One thing to do to lower bill is to minimize your usage of electic appliances during peak hours because rates are higher. Late nights and early mornings are cheaper. I don't know if that's true there in the Philippines.

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The residential electric rate here in the Cebu Metro area (VECO) is a little over $0.25 US per KWH (25.1). I believe that rate is higher than anyplace in the US. In Utah, the rate is less than $0.11 US per KWH (10.31) just as a comparison. If you can make a case for solar power anyplace in the world, you can certainly make a case for it in the Philippines.

 

On energy savings, just by shifting from incandescent and fluorescent lighting to LED lighting, you will save huge amounts of electricity. I have 5, 7 and 9 watt LED lights in and around my house. Compare that to 60, 100 and 150 watt incandescent lights that put out about the same amount of light, and it is obvious there are great savings to be had by switching over to LED. Fluorescent lights don't use much electricity either, but they also don't put out much light.

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Mikala

 

 

The residential electric rate here in the Cebu Metro area (VECO) is a little over $0.25 US per KWH (25.1). I believe that rate is higher than anyplace in the US.

 

On the Big Island of Hawaii, we're up to about $0.435 / KwH. Every month you get a hug with ur bill!

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On the Big Island of Hawaii, we're up to about $0.435 / KwH. Every month you get a hug with ur bill!

 

If they're screwing you like that, they should at least kiss you afterwards.

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Mikala

If they're screwing you like that, they should at least kiss you afterwards.

 

I'm off-grid. More and more folks are installing solar and the local utility is crying (privately) but embracing solar with big smiles (publicly).

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I believe that rate is higher than anyplace in the US.

 

Hawaii is probably the highest in the USA.


On the Big Island of Hawaii, we're up to about $0.435 / KwH. Every month you get a hug with ur bill!

 

No flowers? :D

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to_dave007

At least 20 years ago I had a conversation with a buddy of mine in Toronto about solar power, and I remember he said "You'll NEVER see solar energy common in Toronto, until long after it's common in San Diego". That always stuck with me.. and makes so much sense.

 

Of course it makes so much more sense to install solar in a place with high energy costs and lots of sunlight, and even better sunlight angles year round.

 

On the Big Island of Hawaii, we're up to about $0.435 / KwH. Every month you get a hug with ur bill!

So.. Is solar common in Hawaii yet?

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So.. Is solar common in Hawaii yet?

 

As common as ticks on a hound dog.

 

I have seen satellite images of massive solar arrays on the tops of industrial buildings, down to homes, in Hawaii.

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to_dave007

http://energy.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/EnergyFactsFigures_Jan2013.pdf

 

I searched "houses in Hawaii" on Google, so that I could look at the images, and see how many of those images had solar evident.. after looking at 100+ images, I still hadn't seen one with solar.

 

Paul.. while I think your "common as ticks on a hound dog" analogy is a little too enthusiastic, judging from this article I does seem that solar is really on the move in Hawaii. The quote that I thought was most telling was about roof top solar accounting for 26% of ALL construction in 2012. WOW.. That's pretty significant.

 

If that keeps up (wink), then surely solar installations will be "common as ticks on a hound dog" soon.

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Just goin' by what I have seen. But, I am online up to 16 or 18 hours per day, many days. I sleep very little. So, I have lots of time to look for things.

 

A lot of the images I have seen, have been due to members of alternative energy forums, who have directed me toward them. I have never actively searched for solar arrays in any state, via a search engine.

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