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Remember my recent rainwater harvesting project with my landlord?


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Steel roof.. union Galvesteel.. gutters installed..

why do you ask?

 

Figuring the average rainfall of Cebu per year, and the area of your roof, you could harvest (in the neighborhood of) 189,000 liters (~50,000 gallons) per year. Not including what you send down the water diverter. That's based on about 1,260mm of rain over the course of a year.

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Well, it didn't turn out exactly as I wanted. it to. If you recall, I paid for the PVC. He provided the 1,500 liters capacity tank, and found the guys to do the concrete work. The only thing I had to

Hey, not at all - during this time of the year. Water can get a bit scarce during dry season, at the farm. There we collect rainwater and use it exclusively for drinking, showers, and for my chickens.

You could anchor the tank with cement anchors driven into the concrete, but the tank seems very well protected by the house and the wall.  Concrete needs a full 30 days to cure.  Green concrete, that

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thebob

Nope, but you put the charcoal filter further down the system to remove any odors, chemicals, or heavy metals.  Make it so you can unscrew it and dump the charcoal every few months.

 

Charcoal needs to be "activated" to use as a filter. To activate it it must be exposed to superheated steam. Not any old charcoal will do.

 

But a sand filter is much too coarse for harvested rain water. Paul's water is fine as it is.

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to_dave007

Figuring the average rainfall of Cebu per year, and the area of your roof, you could harvest (in the neighborhood of) 189,000 liters (~50,000 gallons) per year. Not including what you send down the water diverter. That's based on about 1,260mm of rain over the course of a year.

yes.. that matches my own calculations.. quite a bit of water... Too much to just waste it all.

 

I do have a deep well as well.. and the water is pretty good from it.. so far.. though we don't drink it (water delivery is good and cheap for drinking). But it's occasionally slightly saline, and I prefer not to use it too much for watering plants.

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Too much to just waste it all.

 

So far, we are down 4 cubic meters of water usage (per month) due to installing ours at the house in town. They use rainwater to wash dishes and clothes, and perhaps to clean the floors in the house? We also use it to water the plants around the house. So, it definitely helps reduce city water consumption. 

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to_dave007

it definitely helps reduce city water consumption.

lol.. wouldn't help me. There's pipe's out front for city water.. but they have been dry for several years. So we must be self sufficient for water.

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lol.. wouldn't help me. There's pipe's out front for city water.. but they have been dry for several years. So we must be self sufficient for water.

 

We are at the farm (self sufficient), but still need more water storage there - a lot, if I ever were to live there full time. 

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to_dave007

For all those that are squeamish about using rainwater as a source of drinking water, there are MANY rural homes in north America, including my brothers, that use rainwater cisterns. I don't know the specs on his water filter, but he gets his new filters at Home Depot or the like (i.e. totally standard stuff), and it's worked great for more the 30 years.

 

A quick google search "state standard for rainwater harvesting pdf" will locate several USA documents of state standards for rainwater harvesting. If you are worried about safety for potable water (to drink and wash dishes) just make sure you comply with some standard from the USA or someplace else you trust.

 

One of my favorite documents is the Virginia Rainwater Harvesting Manual at https://www.radford.edu/content/dam/departments/administrative/Sustainability/Documents/Rainwater-Manual.pdf

 

German company at www.wisy.de sells a wide range of good quality products for rainwater harvesting (though I don't know how cost effective they are).

 

This practice may not be common for city folk.. but it's also not something that only green-party hippies do.

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I'm sure some of the Australians on the forum can say for sure. But, I believe that, with all the rainwater harvesting they do in Oz, people do not use first flush diverters OR filter the water. I could be wrong, though. During my time there, I didn't see diverters or filters. They just had a second water spigot on the kitchen sink, where the water would be dispensed from.

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If your too worried keep a fish in it. That's what water treatment plants do.

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If your too worried keep a fish in it. That's what water treatment plants do.

 

With Southeast Asians around your water tanks, it would be impossible to keep any fish in a tank of any kind. They would become a meal.

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For anyone who is interested, this is how I linked the water jars that are part of our rainwater collection at the farm. They are piped with 1/2" PVC.

 

As you can see, they bore a hole in the tanks jars AFTER they have cured. They put a stub about 10cm long (a piece of 1/2" PVC) in them along with a 1/2" ball valve. If I go with more of these, at any point, I will have them pipe 1" PVC and ball valves.

 

If they are filling from a heavy rain, something we have quite frequently here, the water will overflow one jar before it has time to divert to the other jars piped in line. 1/2" PVC simply will not carry enough water during filling, under these conditions. So, the first jar to be filled will end up overflowing. 

 

Of course, the Cambodians do not typically install these tanks to be connected together like this. The ball valves are solely for using the water from each jar. 

 

brian_water_jars_r.jpg

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to_dave007

For anyone who is interested, this is how I linked the water jars that are part of our rainwater collection at the farm. They are piped with 1/2" PVC.

Nice and simple. And I am amazed at the cost. Really pretty good all around.

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Really not sure why Filipinos don't do something similar, considering how they love concrete too.

 

It may be due to not having such a lack in rain throughout the year, as we have for several months here. During dry season, it can, literally go months without rain here. From about Nov / Dec to into April of this year, we had almost zero rainfall.

 

I am going to go tomorrow and see if I can find a local place that makes these and see if I can document it. 

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to_dave007

Can be the same in Cebu Paul.. there was one year within the last decade with no rain in my part of Cebu for 6+ months.. that that was abnormal. Looked at the rainfall stats for Cebu, and the dry season has got dryer and longer over last 100 years. The change is attributed partly to climate change, and partly to deforestation.

 

Really.. that cost of that rig of yours is incredibly low at the farm.. seems like a no brainer to me if you have a roof that can fill a jar (a roof NOT painted with red lead paint - for humans)

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Really.. that cost of that rig of yours is incredibly low at the farm.. seems like a no brainer to me if you have a roof that can fill a jar (a roof NOT painted with red lead paint - for humans)

 

I have more money in the collection system at the farm, because I had add everything, from the roof, to the gutters, to the entire harvesting system. Here at the house, the roof and gutter were in place. The owner provided the tank and jars. I only had to buy a few lengths of PVC, less than $30 USD invested.

 

The roof: Nope, not painted at all. At the farm, we have 55 square meters of roof catchment area. It's all metal, like yours. 

Here (in the city) at the house, it is a two story home, a duplex. We have a gable roof, well, more like salt box honestly, with the front side of the main roof just being shorter by about 1 meter or so. Anyway, we catch all the rain from the rear roof area. The total catchment area we use is about 63 square meters. 

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