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Remember my recent rainwater harvesting project with my landlord?


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Paul
When you say rock..Do you mean gravel? Anyway..Where we live the cost would be..

1 m3 Gravel = $27.00

Sand..Same.

3 bags of cement.. $16.00

 

Labour here 200.00 PHP a day.

350.00 PHP per day for a mason.

 

Fred, I neglected to state, the $12.50 labor was for two guys working. How many hours it actually took them to complete the job, I do not actually know.

 

Photos of the sand & gravel (rock). What you would call that? I call it rock, because we have a truck load of pea gravel on the site, too, left over from where the owner originally had the homes built. He uses it for the driveway, now.

 

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On our water catchment system I`m adding this.. In theory anything like sand,leaves,bird crap etc is supposed to settle at the bottom where it can be cleaned out once a week.. On ours the clean out will be a 4" screw on cap so the gunk will just fall out when I open it up..

At the top where the water goes in the tank,I`ll wrap some mosquito net containing filter media like foam or nylon pillow filling which I hope only needs cleaning once a month?..

 

Your image is almost exactly what we have. At the bottom of the First Flush tube, we just have another bell reducer and a 1" ball valve. The 1.5 liter water bottle is sealed inside. You should use a bottle or a rubber ball, to seal the bell reducer up top when it is full. I use the bottle due to the top being considerably higher than the water level inside the 4" PVC. So, it should seal the bell reducer before the tube is completely full.

 

I too, use netting on the tops of the water jars here. Another idea i saw on Youtube, was to put panty hose on the inlet tube to the tank. That would surely filter out a lot of small particles.

 


Those who are talking about going with a filter system, because they are concerned about impurities and contaminants in the rainwater.

 

According to what I learned when installing our first harvesting system at the farm (last year), you should have a minimum of 20 liters per 100 m2 of catchment area initially diverted. In this case, we will divert the first 32 liters from a 63 m2 catchment area.

Edited by South'rn Boy
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Well, it didn't turn out exactly as I wanted. it to. If you recall, I paid for the PVC. He provided the 1,500 liters capacity tank, and found the guys to do the concrete work. The only thing I had to

Hey, not at all - during this time of the year. Water can get a bit scarce during dry season, at the farm. There we collect rainwater and use it exclusively for drinking, showers, and for my chickens.

You could anchor the tank with cement anchors driven into the concrete, but the tank seems very well protected by the house and the wall.  Concrete needs a full 30 days to cure.  Green concrete, that

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A sand filter is cheap and works quite well once the algae is established.  You can back wash them easily, then add a home made charcoal filter made out of some PVC pipes that can be taken apart and you have a cheap, effective filter as long as you water is fairly clean.  A bit of bleach if you are the worrying type.

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Paul

A sand filter is cheap and works quite well once the algae is established.  You can back wash them easily, then add a home made charcoal filter made out of some PVC pipes that can be taken apart and you have a cheap, effective filter as long as you water is fairly clean.  A bit of bleach if you are the worrying type.

 

You know, I think I do have most of what I need to make one of those. we have the sand - if masonry sand will work? We have the larger stone (from the concrete), and we have the small pea gravel that I am sure the landlord wouldn't mind loaning me a bit of each for this project. I just need something to put them all together in, maybe a barrel of some kind. 

 

I don't really care about filtering the rainwater. But, I think it would be a cool project to build.

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jtmwatchbiz

 

 

A bit of bleach if you are the worrying type.

 

 

we have a small pool for our kid and since there is no filter or treatments my wife pours a bit of bleach in the water to keep it safe for a few days before draining and refilling. we picked up that tip off the net when we did a search for kiddie pool water treatments and so far so good. .    

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Masonary sand is usually sharp sand, not river sand that is eroded, so it will work well.

 

Make a good roaring campfire in a hole (if it isn't going to rain) and smother it with a foot of dirt once it is going well.  Voila, charcoal in a half day.

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we have a small pool for our kid and since there is no filter or treatments my wife pours a bit of bleach in the water to keep it safe for a few days before draining and refilling. we picked up that tip off the net when we did a search for kiddie pool water treatments and so far so good. .    

 

Amazing stuff, just a little does wonders.  I've read that some of the preppers stock pool chemicals because it is more stable and cheaper to use.

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Paul

we have a small pool for our kid and since there is no filter or treatments my wife pours a bit of bleach in the water to keep it safe for a few days before draining and refilling. we picked up that tip off the net when we did a search for kiddie pool water treatments and so far so good. .    

 

Bleach evaporates from the water in about 24 hours, Fred. You should let it set over night before letting her swim in it. But, that would be the safest thing to do, in my opinion. 

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jtmwatchbiz

Bleach evaporates from the water in about 24 hours, Fred. You should let it set over night before letting her swim in it. But, that would be the safest thing to do, in my opinion. 

 

 

i'm not 100% sure but i think my wife adds the bleach at the end of the day's playtime so the next day the water is still usable. i'll double check on it. usually the water only lasts for 2 or 3 days tops, as it turns cloudy so we drain, wash and refill it while she's in school.

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Paul

 

 

Make a good roaring campfire in a hole (if it isn't going to rain) and smother it with a foot of dirt once it is going well.  Voila, charcoal in a half day.

 

A sand filter doesn't use charcoal too, does it? I thought it was just sand, pebbles and larger stones?

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Nope, but you put the charcoal filter further down the system to remove any odors, chemicals, or heavy metals.  Make it so you can unscrew it and dump the charcoal every few months.

 

Not so sure larger stones are the best.  You want to slow the water down, make it percolate through the sand so the algae bio mat has time to work its magic.  Sand, a shallow layer of pebbles at the bottom, and a screened outlet to keep the sand in place (make sure you can reverse the flow to unclog it).   You have a D.C. pump, right?   I'd rig it where you have mass storage of unfiltered water for most uses like animals, washing clothes, flushing a toilet, and filtered water for cooking, bathing, washing dishes.  Let the filtered water percolate through the filter slowly into a reservoir then use your D.C. pump.   

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I have no idea. I have not tested it, though.

 

 

 

Like I said in my original post - I was sleeping during the time they were doing this. Trust me, it was done exactly like a Filipino would have done it. My landlord thought it almost crazy, when I told him the minimum thickness we pour concrete slabs in the states is 4" (10cm).

 

Rebar? Surely you jest?! :D

 

 

 

That's why we have First Flush Systems, which work quite well. 

 

In my case, considering the way the landlord built it, I have WELL over what would be required to completely rinse the roof of debris, bat and bird droppings, etc., prior to the water being redirected to the tank. 

If you missed it above, he had installed an entire length (4 meters) of 4" (10cm) PVC as the First Flush tank. It was installed with a 1.5 liter water bottle inside. The water bottle is floated up to the bell reducer (2.5" to 4" PVC) where it will stop the flow of water coming into the 4" PVC just before a PVC "T". The balance of the rainwater will then be routed to the stainless steel tank. 

 It works like a charm, actually. 

 I suppose, if someone wanted to, they could add a water filter. But, in my opinion, there is no need to. I have been drinking it since last October without any side effects - other than this neck twitch that I can't seem to stop. :D

The flushing system is ingenious . When I was a child , the neighbors rain water collection had a manual lever that had to be moved from the dump position to collection. Always had to get wet.
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The flushing system is ingenious . When I was a child , the neighbors rain water collection had a manual lever that had to be moved from the dump position to collection. Always had to get wet.

 

It prevents quite a bit of impurities from being routed to the storage tanks. The one here at the house holds about 32 liters of water. Every time we open the ball valve at the bottom of it, in order to empty the tube, it has quite a bit of dirt and debris in it.

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to_dave007

Have you filled the tank yet?

Any mosquitos in it?

 

When I built the house I planned for rainwater harvesting at phase II.. which is approaching. I have 150 sqm of roof.. so can catch a lot of water. Good to see this thread.

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Have you filled the tank yet?

Any mosquitos in it?

 

When I built the house I planned for rainwater harvesting at phase II.. which is approaching. I have 150 sqm of roof.. so can catch a lot of water. Good to see this thread.

 

Yes sir.

Not a one in the tank or jar. The tank is covered and so is the jar. No light enters either storage vessel. Therefore, no bacteria can grow in either. 

 

What kind of roof do you have?

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to_dave007

What kind of roof do you have?

Steel roof.. union Galvesteel.. gutters installed..

why do you ask?

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