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Remember my recent rainwater harvesting project with my landlord?


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Paul

Well, it didn't turn out exactly as I wanted. it to. If you recall, I paid for the PVC. He provided the 1,500 liters capacity tank, and found the guys to do the concrete work. The only thing I had to do, was to set the size of the concrete pad I wanted poured. Naturally, they had suggested it be poured "Asian sized". I informed my g/f that I wanted it a bit bigger (about three times the size suggested to me) than they had originally set. I showed her a couple of days ago, and she said she would let them know. She did good. :)

 

Day 1: Pouring of the concrete slab.

 

They were also going to do this for us yesterday morning. I asked her to wake me up as soon as the concrete guys got here, so I could keep an eye on what they were doing. (I was also going to bury a 3/4" PVC line to link the two future tanks with the current one, so the piping would be below the concrete rather than above it.) Well, since I stay awake most nights - all night, I usually start sleeping about 6 or 7 am, usually for a few hours. Well, that's all the needed, apparently, for them to complete the job and leave. No, she didn't bother to wake me up.

 

At least she remembered to take photos for me, though:

 

The guy finishing off the concrete.

I have no idea of the mixture they use here.

I imagine it will be similar to the Philippines, without western guidance.

IMG_1320r.jpg

 

A view of where the tank was supposed to be sunk INTO the foundation.

But, it will now sit ON the foundation.

IMG_1323r.jpg

 

You can see the square rain gutter mounted up top. 9 meters long.

The downspout, unfortunately, is on the wrong end of the building.

The PVC will be run back down to our side of the building.

Then, it will be piped into the top of the tank.

IMG_1325r.jpg
 

 

So, as Bob put it in my previous thread:
 

It's just dead weight. The weight will always be in the bottom. When it's full it's a ton and a half not much is gonna push that over.
When it's a third full you have got half a ton sitting in the bottom.
 
We don't need to overthink this, cheap, fast and nasty. Let out your internal redneck.

 

It certainly ended up that way. :D

 


Day 2: Today, installing the rain gutter piping.

 

Again, I requested that my darling wake me when they started on the PVC installation for the rainwater harvesting, so I could be there to let them know how I wanted it. She was every bit as reliable as the day before...

 

I slept right through it all.

 

 

 

So, I wake up from a nap this afternoon to find my landlord finishing the installation of the PVC system. I now have a first flush system that has a 9 meter long 4" PVC pipe on it, with a 1" ball valve to empty it, at the bottom. (Well, that part is good - the ball valve.) He also did add a 1.5 liter empty, sealed water bottle to close off the bell reducer at the top of the First Flush System. The one minor problem is, I was only going to run a portion of that length for the first flush. Now, when the rains come, it will take it a while to fill up 4 meters of 4" PVC pipe. Well, at least the water coming from the roof will be clean by the time the water gets routed to the tank! 

My Calculations: 4 meters = 13 feet, 1 foot of 4" PVC will hold .64 / gallon. If my figures are correct, this should be about 32 liters of water. (I believe that is correct. I was still half asleep when I did that. So, I may be off with the calculations a bit. Not that it matters much. 4 meters long and 4" of pipe is still a LOT of water.)

 

It shouldn't take too terribly long to still fill up the first 1,500 liter tank. Then, it will be routed to 2 - 1,050 liters concrete jars. 

 

The 1,500 liter tank, that was supposed to be modified according to my instructions. I'm invisible, apparently.

IMG_1328r.jpg

 

Just to the left side of the bottom of the tank, you can see the red handle of the cut off valve, on the other end of the house.

That is also the bottom of the 4 meters 4" PVC pipe, coming from the downspout.

IMG_1329r.jpg

 

A fairly large area, giving the "Boss" plenty of room to wash the clothes outside.

IMG_1330r.jpg

 

Two large 1,050 liters concrete jars will soon be on either side of the little tree.

IMG_1331r.jpg

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Well, it didn't turn out exactly as I wanted. it to. If you recall, I paid for the PVC. He provided the 1,500 liters capacity tank, and found the guys to do the concrete work. The only thing I had to

Hey, not at all - during this time of the year. Water can get a bit scarce during dry season, at the farm. There we collect rainwater and use it exclusively for drinking, showers, and for my chickens.

You could anchor the tank with cement anchors driven into the concrete, but the tank seems very well protected by the house and the wall.  Concrete needs a full 30 days to cure.  Green concrete, that

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Paul

I believe the following prices are what were charged. I'm curious, how do they compare to costs in the Philippines, if anyone knows?

 

Rock: 48,000r ($12.00 US) m3

Sand: 42,000r ($10.50 US)  m3  

Cement (3 sacks): 57,000r ($14.25 US) 

 

Labor (2 men) to pour and finish the concrete: $12.50 US

Edited by South'rn Boy
added number of laborers working
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TheMatrix

Interesting Paul.  However, I wonder why you're collecting rain water runoff.  Is there a water shortage where you live in the tropics or lack of water infrastructure?  Do you have some advanced filtration to help clean the water? 

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Paul

Interesting Paul.  However, I wonder why you're collecting rain water runoff.  Is there a water shortage where you live in the tropics or lack of water infrastructure?  Do you have some advanced filtration to help clean the water? 

 

Hey, not at all - during this time of the year. Water can get a bit scarce during dry season, at the farm. There we collect rainwater and use it exclusively for drinking, showers, and for my chickens. (I say for my chickens, because they let the other chickens drink any sort of nasty water available.) Currently, we do not filter any drinking water, with the exception of using a first flush diverter, screens on top of the water jars, and a 50 mesh strainer in line just before my ShurFlo DC pump. It tastes a bit different from bottled or city water. But, after you get accustomed to it, it's great. I can say this with certainty. It's pure enough to use in FLA batteries! I can't say that about bottled or city water! 

 

The primary reason I want to use it here is, the city water is not as clean as the rainwater. Also, I know how the rainwater I harvest is being handled prior to using it. City water here - well, leaves a lot to be desired.

 

Above all, harvesting rainwater is another way to conserve. My landlord already had the gutter system in place. I figured I should not let it go to waste. I mean, for less than $30 USD invested, I will have 3,600 liters (~951 US gallons) of water storage. So, why not do it? We are talking $.0083c US per liter of water, for the first 3,600 liters. It gets cheaper after then.

 

I will never be able to set up a similar collection system anywhere else for that amount of money. The 63 square meters of roof (collection surface) we have, will be considerably more than we need in order to keep the tanks filled until the end of rainy season. Honestly, I wish I had the money to put another 20,000 liters (~5,283 US gallons) of storage at the farm. That would take us through the entire dry season.

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Knowdafish

Question - what is the pH of the rainwater there? Here in Dumaguete it is often acidic due to pollution and acid rain. 

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Bill H

You could anchor the tank with cement anchors driven into the concrete, but the tank seems very well protected by the house and the wall.  Concrete needs a full 30 days to cure.  Green concrete, that is concrete that is not cured is VERY weak.  I would not fill that tank until it had cured for a month.  I wouldn't even walk on it for a week or so.  Lastly.....rebar?

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Mikala

Hilti concrete anchors are great. You could go to your local Hilti distributor or perhaps Home Depot there in Battambang to pickup a box. Don't forget to ask for their awesome calendar!  :yahoo:

 

Hilti Anchor.jpg

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Skywalker

I think the idea of harvesting rainwater is very worthwhile.

 

I really don't understand why it isn't more popular.  Specially in more remote 'off the grid' areas where the rain is hard to predict, and the water supply might not be particularly regular.

 

I'm not sure I'd want to drink it without putting it through filters.  Remember your roof collects bat/bird shit amongst other pollutants.

Edited by Skywalker
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Mikala

 

 

Remember your roof collects bat/bird shit amongst other pollutants.

 

It adds to the 'flavor'!

 

I've known neighbors that found dead rats in their water tank. Imagine how you'd feel after finding that!

 

I use spring water on my ranch, put it thru 2 filters and then a final UV purification unit. I still don't drink it. I use it for cooking though. I prefer vodka for drinking!

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Paul

Question - what is the pH of the rainwater there? Here in Dumaguete it is often acidic due to pollution and acid rain.

 

I have no idea. I have not tested it, though.

 

 

You could anchor the tank with cement anchors driven into the concrete, but the tank seems very well protected by the house and the wall.  Concrete needs a full 30 days to cure.  Green concrete, that is concrete that is not cured is VERY weak.  I would not fill that tank until it had cured for a month.  I wouldn't even walk on it for a week or so.  Lastly.....rebar?

 

Like I said in my original post - I was sleeping during the time they were doing this. Trust me, it was done exactly like a Filipino would have done it. My landlord thought it almost crazy, when I told him the minimum thickness we pour concrete slabs in the states is 4" (10cm).

 

Rebar? Surely you jest?! :D

 

 

I'm not sure I'd want to drink it without putting it through filters.  Remember your roof collects bat/bird shit amongst other pollutants.

 

That's why we have First Flush Systems, which work quite well. 

 

In my case, considering the way the landlord built it, I have WELL over what would be required to completely rinse the roof of debris, bat and bird droppings, etc., prior to the water being redirected to the tank. 

 

If you missed it above, he had installed an entire length (4 meters) of 4" (10cm) PVC as the First Flush tank. It was installed with a 1.5 liter water bottle inside. The water bottle is floated up to the bell reducer (2.5" to 4" PVC) where it will stop the flow of water coming into the 4" PVC just before a PVC "T". The balance of the rainwater will then be routed to the stainless steel tank. 

 

It works like a charm, actually. 

 

I suppose, if someone wanted to, they could add a water filter. But, in my opinion, there is no need to. I have been drinking it since last October without any side effects - other than this neck twitch that I can't seem to stop. :D

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Paul

I tell ya, if you fellas wouldn't drink rainwater with a little bird pooh in it, don't ever go to Australia. They do a LOT of rainwater harvesting in Australia. God only knows what would be in some of those water tanks. Don't believe me? Ask 'em. They drink it and it doesn't hurt them.

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TheMatrix

I think the idea of harvesting rainwater is very worthwhile.

 

I really don't understand why it isn't more popular.  Specially in more remote 'off the grid' areas where the rain is hard to predict, and the water supply might not be particularly regular.

 

I'm not sure I'd want to drink it without putting it through filters.  Remember your roof collects bat/bird shit amongst other pollutants.

 

Agreed.  I love the idea, but would have to heavily depend on some advanced filtration if I were to drink it.  Remember, there are birds pooping on the roof tops, and bird poop carries lots of pathogens including the bird-flu and many others.  Also, I am assuming you don't get that thick air pollution like in Cebu City, supposedly from the jeepneys, whereas everything is coated with a black oily gunk.

 

I live on a hill slope and currently digging in some french drains for excess water to pour into my ponds.  I think in our lifetimes we are headed to massive water shortages... especially for farmers, thus the reason for my new drains. Check out this article:

http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/7/29/water-electricitydroughts.html

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Paul

 

 

Also, I am assuming you don't get that thick air pollution like in Cebu City, supposedly from the jeepneys, whereas everything is coated with a black oily gunk.

 

In this city, very little pollution. It's never crowded on the roads. When you get out toward our farm, the pollution goes to zero. I like the air here, in general.

 

Of course, we are talking about an entire country of maybe 15,000,000 people. Compare that to a country of over 100,000,000, in the Philippines. I'm sure the pollution levels are going to be significantly higher, there. 

 

I'm still not concerned about the bird poop. The rains here come so heavily, I am quite sure the water washes the roof clean, prior to it being routed to the tanks. 

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fred42

I believe the following prices are what were charged. I'm curious, how do they compare to costs in the Philippines, if anyone knows?

 

Rock: 48,000r ($12.00 US) m3

Sand: 42,000r ($10.50 US)  m3  

Cement (3 sacks): 57,000r ($14.25 US) 

 

Labor to pour and finish the concrete: $12.50 US

 

When you say rock..Do you mean gravel? Anyway..Where we live the cost would be..

 m3 Gravel = $27.00

Sand..Same.

3 bags of cement.. $16.00

 

Labour here 200.00 PHP a day.

350.00 PHP per day for a mason.

Edited by fred42
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fred42

I tell ya, if you fellas wouldn't drink rainwater with a little bird pooh in it, don't ever go to Australia. They do a LOT of rainwater harvesting in Australia. God only knows what would be in some of those water tanks. Don't believe me? Ask 'em. They drink it and it doesn't hurt them.

 

On our water catchment system I`m adding this.. In theory anything like sand,leaves,bird crap etc is supposed to settle at the bottom where it can be cleaned out once a week.. On ours the clean out will be a 4" screw on cap so the gunk will just fall out when I open it up..

At the top where the water goes in the tank,I`ll wrap some mosquito net containing filter media like foam or nylon pillow filling which I hope only needs cleaning once a month?..

 

post-1-0-40735000-1407557134_thumb.jpg

Edited by South'rn Boy
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