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So, yesterday, I mentioned to my landlord...


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Paul , those angle iron extensions on the stand of that stainless tank don't look safe to me , maybe they are stronger than they look but would it be possible to chop them off and put the tank on some sort of sturdy tank stand , standing on its original short legs ? 

 

Once that tank is full and being buffeted by winds , i'd be concerned that a leg could buckle and bend , could be nasty if someone was nearby ?

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... that I would like to start conserving a bit of water here at our rental house. My intention was to come out of pocket for it. In fact, I mentioned I would pay for the PVC as soon as I get a bit mo

Just goes to show that there are some good ones out there very cool of him to do that.

It's just dead weight. The weight will always be in the bottom. When it's full it's a ton and a half not much is gonna push that over. When it's a third full you have got half a ton sitting in the bo

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Davaoeno

 

 

Ever heard - don't look a gift horse in the mouth?  

 

 

My comment wasnt about the value of the freebie- but about how to make it safe.   A freebie is a freebie - and should never be questioned !! haha

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easy44

Looks strong enough to me.  You could weld in some reinforcements to strengthen it if you wanted.  Between the wall and the house looks like a protected spot where the likelihood of it being blown over would be minimal.  An alternative would be to pour a raised concrete slab that would be stronger than the steel and never rust.

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Bill H

 

 

 

Impossible to tell the dimensions of the stock from the picture, but if I were going to fabricate this, I would use 2"x2"x1/4" angle.  Anything less than that would not be strong enough in my opinion.  If my budget was not limited I'd up the angle dimension to 2.5"X2.5"X1/4" which would be even better and 3" would be near perfect!  If it is less than 2" it's not safe, I'd have a new one fabricated making it a 4 legged stand, not a 3 using the above sized stock.  I doubt the stand would cost very much to fabricate, even there and you'll sleep better know it isn't likely to fall on your head when the wind blows.  If I were fabricating it, I would also build a ring support which extended past the midpoint of the tank to insure it could not tip over in the wind and I'd anchor the whole shebang in a concrete slab with some re-bar or reinforcing mesh, but that's just me.

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Paul

First, I wanted to point out that I EDITED THIS POST to add a bit further information to it.

 

 

 

Paul , those angle iron extensions on the stand of that stainless tank don't look safe to me , maybe they are stronger than they look but would it be possible to chop them off and put the tank on some sort of sturdy tank stand , standing on its original short legs ? 
 
Once that tank is full and being buffeted by winds , i'd be concerned that a leg could buckle and bend , could be nasty if someone was nearby ?

 

 

Well, I measured the angle - 1.5" (photo below). It has been under the tank since they purchased it. Of course, it seems that SE Asians, no matter where they are from, are all about doing something as cheaply as possible, not always having personal safety in mind. 

 

I think I will have some wall and building anchors installed, to brace the tank. Although, I don't think, considering where I am going to place it, I will have any issues with the wind. (The distance between the rear wall of the house and the perimeter fence allow just enough room for the tank. 

 

 

My comment wasnt about the value of the freebie- but about how to make it safe.   A freebie is a freebie - and should never be questioned !! haha

 

Exactly my point. I got a freebie to work with. A lot cheaper than having to buy a new one. 

 

 

Looks strong enough to me.  You could weld in some reinforcements to strengthen it if you wanted.  Between the wall and the house looks like a protected spot where the likelihood of it being blown over would be minimal.  An alternative would be to pour a raised concrete slab that would be stronger than the steel and never rust.

 

Definitely gonna reinforce it, if at all possible. (I am, to some degree, at the mercy of the landlord. But, I will do whatever he will allow me to do.)

 

IMG_1266_r.jpg

 

IMG_1268_r.jpg

 

 

Impossible to tell the dimensions of the stock from the picture, but if I were going to fabricate this, I would use 2"x2"x1/4" angle.  Anything less than that would not be strong enough in my opinion.  If my budget was not limited I'd up the angle dimension to 2.5"X2.5"X1/4" which would be even better and 3" would be near perfect!  If it is less than 2" it's not safe, I'd have a new one fabricated making it a 4 legged stand, not a 3 using the above sized stock.  I doubt the stand would cost very much to fabricate, even there and you'll sleep better know it isn't likely to fall on your head when the wind blows.  If I were fabricating it, I would also build a ring support which extended past the midpoint of the tank to insure it could not tip over in the wind and I'd anchor the whole shebang in a concrete slab with some re-bar or reinforcing mesh, but that's just me.

 

We will pour a thick slab to support the tank, between the wall and the house. I am not going to give it an opportunity to "blow over" with 1,500 liters of water in it. 

 

Unfortunately, the angle is only 1.5" x 1.5". 

 

IMG_1265_r.jpg

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X-braces on each of the three sides might give you all the strength you need. It will also provided a lot more stability, since a triangle is the strongest and most stable shape. Be sure to have the x-braces welded in the middle as well as at the ends where they meet the vertical legs. And make sure the base is securely welded to the base on the tank.

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Paul

 

 

And make sure the base is securely welded to the base on the tank.

 

I can't say I know much about metallurgy. But, the tank is not exactly thick walled. And, it is stainless. The angle / frame is all iron? I don't know if that will work, without burning a hole through the tank? Maybe the strap idea would be better?

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What is the wall thickness of that angle , I would guess 3 or 4 mm , what are the quality of welds ? 40 x 40 mm or 1 1/2 " x 1 1/2 " by 3 or 4 mm is not good engineering , add a bit of rust and possibly dodgy welds and there is a recipe for disaster .

 

Mate , if it was me I would absolutely cut that crap off . I agree with Bill H in post #19 above re. minimum dimensions , personally I would make a stand of some sort from concrete blocks or decent steel and sit the tank on that on its original legs which from the photo look slightly splayed outwards adding to stability . Unlike the extensions.

 

The original parts of the tank look good , the leg extensions are crap and could potentially kill someone . I would not try and reinforce a poor job , it needs to be done properly for safety , if that is going to cost a few bucks , I'll kick in a bit through the donation portal on this site , maybe a few others might too . Please do not use those extensions .

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Paul

What is the wall thickness of that angle , I would guess 3 or 4 mm , what are the quality of welds ? 40 x 40 mm or 1 1/2 " x 1 1/2 " by 3 or 4 mm is not good engineering , add a bit of rust and possibly dodgy welds and there is a recipe for disaster .

 

Mate , if it was me I would absolutely cut that crap off . I agree with Bill H in post #19 above re. minimum dimensions , personally I would make a stand of some sort from concrete blocks or decent steel and sit the tank on that on its original legs which from the photo look slightly splayed outwards adding to stability . Unlike the extensions.

 

The original parts of the tank look good , the leg extensions are crap and could potentially kill someone . I would not try and reinforce a poor job , it needs to be done properly for safety , if that is going to cost a few bucks , I'll kick in a bit through the donation portal on this site , maybe a few others might too . Please do not use those extensions .

 

Well, as I stated, I am at the mercy of the landlord. I will talk with him again, and try to get him to understand the importance of it. However, having resided in these countries for such a long time, trying to convince a local that the westerner knows what he is talking about - well, is like pulling hens teeth. 

 

You should have been here when the "cutting edge" solar guy saw an MPPT controller for the first time, the other day. My solar array is 24vdc. My battery is only 12vdc. I couldn't convince him that there are controllers on the market today that will allow different voltages. (The old style PWM controllers are set up where the solar array and the batteries MUST be the same voltage. They are the only type of controller you will find around here, primarily because they are much cheaper than MPPT controllers.) Anyway, he kept telling my g/f that I was going to short out my controller by connecting 24v panels to a 12v battery. You should have seen the look on his face when I showed him otherwise. :rolleyes:

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thebob

 

 

Mate , if it was me I would absolutely cut that crap off . I agree with Bill H in post #19 above re. minimum dimensions , personally I would make a stand of some sort from concrete blocks or decent steel and sit the tank on that on its original legs which from the photo look slightly splayed outwards adding to stability . Unlike the extensions.

 

Thats what I'd do. Use the original legs, chop off the extensions, maybe leave 9 inches of them to to set into a  wider concrete base. It's too tall and skinny. C of G is too high.

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Paul

Thats what I'd do. Use the original legs, chop off the extensions, maybe leave 9 inches of them to to set into a  wider concrete base. It's too tall and skinny. C of G is too high.

 

 

Cut (red line), then weld cross pieces to help anchor it in the concrete?

 

IMG_1259c.jpg

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I can't say I know much about metallurgy. But, the tank is not exactly thick walled. And, it is stainless. The angle / frame is all iron? I don't know if that will work, without burning a hole through the tank? Maybe the strap idea would be better?

 

I said the base of the tank...not the tank itself. From the picture, I can see they have already welded the base (the angle iron part directly under the tank) to the tank itself. Now all you need to do is weld the base the landlord supplied (or a new base you supply yourself with heavier stock) to the bottom of the tank base, and weld in x-braces to tie everything together. Anchor the base to a concrete pad, and you shouldn't ever have a problem with the tank again.

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Paul

I said the base of the tank...not the tank itself. From the picture, I can see they have already welded the base (the angle iron part directly under the tank) to the tank itself. Now all you need to do is weld the base the landlord supplied to the bottom of the tank base, and weld in x-braces to tie everything together.

 

No. The tank sits in that ring. Nothing secures the tank to the ring part of the frame, but gravity.

 

Click the image in my previous post above yours, to see the full sized image.

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I see. Then you will need to secure it to the base.

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thebob

Cut (red line), then weld cross pieces to help anchor it in the concrete?

 

 

Thats what I would do. Then you have the 6 bars that come out of the ring to loop tie wire, stainless would be nice, over the top of the tank to keep it in place. Either turnbuckles for tension, or twisted together with pliers. You don't really even need to weld the cross pieces, notched with a file and wired up will be good enough once it's set in concrete. A wide base rather than a deep one.

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