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So, yesterday, I mentioned to my landlord...


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... that I would like to start conserving a bit of water here at our rental house. My intention was to come out of pocket for it. In fact, I mentioned I would pay for the PVC as soon as I get a bit mo

Just goes to show that there are some good ones out there very cool of him to do that.

It's just dead weight. The weight will always be in the bottom. When it's full it's a ton and a half not much is gonna push that over. When it's a third full you have got half a ton sitting in the bo

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CebuKano

Just goes to show that there are some good ones out there :) very cool of him to do that.

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thebob

I think the real value added for water collection is to make a solar still. Drinking water is more valuable than caught rainfall.

 

The problem in Moalboal with water harvesting is that tanks are so expensive and water is so cheap. Are the jars in your picture ceramic? 

 

I might try casting some concrete ones.

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Paul
Are the jars in your picture ceramic? 

 

No. They are concrete. Those pictured above are smaller ones. I grabbed that image off the internet.

 

The ones we have at the farm are 1,050 liter jars, much larger. They are all over the place here and can be had for a song. I will correct this if I am mistaken. But, I think the large ones are less than $20 USD each - delivered. 

 

The only problem I have seen with them is, aside from having a 1/2" (13mm) drain plug at the base of the large jars, they have the same sized ball valve on the front side with a nipple coming out of the jar. You then pop a PVC "T" on there and join them to other jars, as we did in the image below: 

 

IMG_0248.jpg

 

Personally, I would go with a larger PVC pipe and ball valve out the front. Reason being is, we have had such hard rains that the initial tank would overflow before the others could equalize with it. Just a thought, if this interests you, Bob.

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thebob

 

 

Personally, I would go with a larger PVC pipe and ball valve out the front. Reason being is, we have had such hard rains that the initial tank would overflow before the others could equalize with it. Just a thought, if this interests you, Bob.

 

Yes, what interests me is how they are made. How thick are they?  I'm wondering if I could  use large round section circular culvert.

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Paul

I had to go back a ways to find some older images before we did the additions to the farm house. This was the first set up of the rainwater harvesting we did. Each jar is 1,050 liters. The first flush was too large for the original house. But, I wanted it large so it would still be an acceptable size when we added on the other rooms to the house.

 

IMG_0123c.jpg

 

One thing we did, in order to keep mosquitoes and trash out of the tanks, was to add a mesh to the tops wrapped over the necks of the tanks and below the lids. You can't really tell here, but they are tapered necks. At the shoulder of the tank, the necks are smaller than at the top. So, we just took bailing wire and wrapped over the mesh at the shoulder of each tank. The mesh also serves as a strainer, and it double layered. Now, nothing gets inside the jars but water. 

 

I was planning on something similar for the house (our rental home here in Battambang), until we got the free use of the stainless steel tank. It would still be a good idea for me to come up with additional water storage, as we have done at the farm.  

 

EDIT: There is an empty 1.5 Liter water bottle in the First Flush system. It fills with the initial water from the rains off the roof, bringing with it the dirt, dust, and bird droppings off the roof. The bottle will then stop any further water from going into the First Flush, and will prevent any of the contaminated water from flowing out into the overflow and on to the tanks. This keeps the cleanest water going to storage, 

Edited by South'rn Boy
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Paul

Yes, what interests me is how they are made. How thick are they?  I'm wondering if I could  use large round section circular culvert.

 

One way I see people making water storage tanks is, to buy concrete rings used for, of all things - septic tanks. The rings are like $7.50 US each. They take four of them, which, if I recall from my calculations back then was about 5,000 liters (internal volume, combined), and concrete them together. Here is an image of the ones we use as our septic tank system.

 

IMG_0303.jpg

I can try to find out for you, regarding the thickness of the jars. When we go out to the farm, we pass a place that makes them.

Edited by South'rn Boy
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Paul

The really neat thing I like about using tanks (jars) like these, is the fact that you can pipe the watering nipples that you buy off eBay for chickens - or in your case, turkeys? Talk about an endless water supply for your farm animals. 

 

We later piped the water to the ducks, using float valves to automatically fill their water troughs. No more carrying water to the animals. Of course, we use multiple check valves to stop the water going back to the tanks (jars). 

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Paul

Finally got around to taking a photo of the tank the landlord has. 

 

A windstorm came through and blew it over today. I'm glad it did. It was quite nasty inside the tank! We will definitely be cleaning it, prior to its first use!

 

IMG_1259_r.jpg


It scared the hell out of the chicks, as they were in their coop today (for the first time), when the tank went over very near them!

 

IMG_1262_r.jpg

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Headshot

You might want to figure out a way to secure the tank so it won't tip over again. Did you say you were going to pour a concrete pad?

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Paul

You might want to figure out a way to secure the tank so it won't tip over again. Did you say you were going to pour a concrete pad?

 

Yeah. I am actually going to move the tank and stand to the left of where it is presently, to behind the house. It will be between the house and the perimeter fence. I will make it a point to anchor the support stand to the concrete, if the owner will let me. 

 

My concern is thinking the tank should be mounted, in some fashion, to the stand. I am sure it will stay in position when filled with (1,500 Kgs / 3,300 pounds) a ton and a half of water. But, I feel it should be secured some how, other than just sitting on the stand. 

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Bill H

... that I would like to start conserving a bit of water here at our rental house. My intention was to come out of pocket for it. In fact, I mentioned I would pay for the PVC as soon as I get a bit more money in. Then, I would buy some of the "water jars" (photo below) common to Cambodia, to store the water in. (Larger ones have valves that you can cut off and link together with PVC so they will all fill evenly, as they do at our farm.)

 

attachicon.gifwater_jars.jpg

 

He already has gutter installed along the rear of the building. So, that wouldn't need to be done. A few tanks and some PVC and we are ready to harvest rainwater.

 

Then, he surprised me.

 

Early this morning, he showed up with a 1,500 Liter (~396 gallons) metal water tank on a stand. So, about 10 meters of PVC pipe, a few valves, and I will be collecting water off a 9 meter X 7 meter (rear half of the building) roof. 63 m2 (~678 ft2) will give me a fair amount of water. It won't take long, one good rain in fact, to completely fill a 1,500 liter tank. 

 

What a super nice guy he is. He's even going to extend the concrete slab out the rear door of the house, so the "boss" has a place to wash clothes using the rainwater. 

 

<sigh> some people get all the luck.  All my drunk German landlord ever did for me was stand at the gate screaming at 6am and when I went out to calm him down he sucker punched me while I was trying to reason with his ex-wife.

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Bill H

 

 

My concern is thinking the tank should be mounted, in some fashion, to the stand. I am sure it will stay in position when filled with (1,500 Kgs / 3,300 pounds) a ton and a half of water. But, I feel it should be secured some how, other than just sitting on the stand. 

 

Easy to do, run a stainless steel strap over the tank and secure to the stand frame with turnbuckles so you can tension the strap.  It would not take a very big strap and it should give you some peace of mind.

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Davaoeno

Yeah. I am actually going to move the tank and stand to the left of where it is presently, to behind the house. It will be between the house and the perimeter fence. I will make it a point to anchor the support stand to the concrete, if the owner will let me. 

 

My concern is thinking the tank should be mounted, in some fashion, to the stand. I am sure it will stay in position when filled with (1,500 Kgs / 3,300 pounds) a ton and a half of water. But, I feel it should be secured some how, other than just sitting on the stand. 

 

 

thats one cheap assed tank stand he is using. . Personally i dont think a strap is going to do the job. Nor do i think anchoring the stand to the concrete will be of much use if you have high gusting winds . I would put a  ring around it as high as the top of the fence then anchor the ring to the top of the concrete wall and  also the house.  Get as high a  centre of gravity as possible.

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Paul

thats one cheap assed tank stand he is using. . Personally i dont think a strap is going to do the job. Nor do i think anchoring the stand to the concrete will be of much use if you have high gusting winds . I would put a  ring around it as high as the top of the fence then anchor the ring to the top of the concrete wall and  also the house.  Get as high a  centre of gravity as possible.

 

Ever heard - don't look a gift horse in the mouth? :D 

He said this tank actually belongs to his brother. But, his brother wasn't using it, so he apparently "requisitioned" it for us. :D From the dirt and rubbish in it, the tank had obviously not been used in some time. 

 

 

Easy to do, run a stainless steel strap over the tank and secure to the stand frame with turnbuckles so you can tension the strap.  It would not take a very big strap and it should give you some peace of mind.

 

Thanks. I will try anything to make it safer, if he will let me. The last thing I want, is for that tank to fall over (again), especially filled with water. 

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