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riklynbor

Building Using Insulated Roof Panels.

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Hy H

I see you have saddles in each end truss to take ridge beam.

 

 For the  ridge beam. You using trusses, columns, posts or just rafters without collar ties for span support? 

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Headshot

Look at the first picture in post #11. Unless I miss my bet, the ridge beam is right in the middle of the picture

Edited by Headshot

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oztony

Look at the first picture in post #11. Unless I miss my bet, the ridge beam is right in the middle of the picture

Yes , a webbed truss beam , this guy knows his stuff'.

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Hy H

Look at the first picture in post #11. Unless I miss my bet, the ridge beam is right in the middle of the picture

 

 

Not sure if you referring to my post on this HS ?

 

Yeahh  well aware the beam in picture.  11 meter single span is a quite long with out any mid span support and tie down for any uplift.

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oztony

Not sure if you referring to my post on this HS ?

 

Yeahh  well aware the beam in picture.  11 meter single span is a quite long with out any mid span support and tie down for any uplift.

I think you will find more trusses will be installed , the ones at either end of the building will now allow a straight line to be had , so the others can be installed easily in alignment

I do remember a post about big open ceiling , so above comment maybe incorrect speculation    :)

Edited by oztony

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Hy H

I think you will find more trusses will be installed , the ones at either end of the building will now allow a straight line to be had , so the others can be installed easily in alignment    :)

 

 

Maybe no std trusses mate.  I think Op mentioned wanting clean flat raking ceiling line.  There maybe are walls hes planning building all the way to under beam to reduce actual span perhaps bout 30%.  Posts would take the load and tie it down but not give any lateral bracing to external walls.

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riklynbor

Well the webbed truss will be mostly supported by the front and rear truss. The distance between the front and rear truss is 9 meters. I am going for a as big and uninterupted ceiling as possible. The webbed truss will also runn through the master bedroom wall in which a 100 x 100 mm square steel post will be hidden to take some of the weight of the roof as the insulated panels are quite weighty. We hope to install the webbed truss tomorrow so dont change the channel :-)

 

post-14249-0-74037700-1406285736_thumb.jpg

 

post-14249-0-18100100-1406285839_thumb.jpg

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Headshot

Well the webbed truss will be mostly supported by the front and rear truss. The distance between the front and rear truss is 9 meters. I am going for a as big and uninterupted ceiling as possible. The webbed truss will also runn through the master bedroom wall in which a 100 x 100 mm square steel post will be hidden to take some of the weight of the roof as the insulated panels are quite weighty. We hope to install the webbed truss tomorrow so dont change the channel :-)

 

Frankly, the front and rear trusses look fairly lightweight in comparison to the webbed ridge truss. Maybe it's an optical illusion. I suppose (hope) you had the front and rear trusses engineered to take the expected roof loads. This could turn ugly in a hurry if they aren't adequate for the loading. There aren't any backup trusses in the middle of the house, so everything is dependent on those two trusses.

Edited by Headshot

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Hy H

Frankly, the front and rear trusses look fairly lightweight in comparison to the webbed ridge truss. Maybe it's an optical illusion. I suppose (hope) you had the front and rear trusses engineered to take the expected roof loads. This could turn ugly in a hurry if they aren't adequate for the loading.

 

 

Exactly my thoughts.   As op mentioned there will additional support to the beam. This way roofload will be divided by any other support added between front and back trusses. They do look a bit lightweight for such a shallow pitch, which to me appears only to be somewhere around 20 degrees.

 

This single span especially what looks like balcony end in picture. The one in other end would be ok just having little packer on top of concrete beam below bottom chord under kingpost.

Edited by Hy H

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Headshot

Exactly my thoughts.   As op mentioned there will additional support to the beam. This way roofload will be divided by any other support added between front and back trusses. They do look a bit lightweight for such a shallow pitch, which to me appears only to be somewhere around 20 degrees.

 

This single span especially what looks like balcony end in picture. The one in other end would be ok just having little packer on top of concrete beam below bottom chord under kingpost.

 

I see now. He said there will be a steel post supporting the web truss (hidden in the back master bedroom wall) to help support the weight of the roof, but I'm still not sure about those end trusses. I think I would have been a bit more conservation and either beef up the end trusses or support the centers with the same dimension steel posts, but then I don't know what the floor plan looks like and how that would work out. I just hope that this was signed off on by a structural engineer and that the trusses are adequate for the load.

 

Well the webbed truss will be mostly supported by the front and rear truss. The webbed truss will also run through the master bedroom wall in which a 100 x 100 mm square steel post will be hidden to take some of the weight of the roof as the insulated panels are quite weighty.

Edited by Headshot

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Hy H

He might be planning floor to ceiling bi-fold doors or windows for the balcony end where beam overhang is.  That reason why no post there. If that the case , you definitely do not want any sag in truss above it. 

 

  Earlier he did mention not following any plans for the truss design.    Double up on end trusses.. maybe enough ?

 

 Hard to say without knowing actual roof weight.  Looking at pictures and std of work done there, I`m sure he is well aware.

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Headshot

He might be planning floor to ceiling bi-fold doors or windows for the balcony end where beam overhang is.  That reason why no post there. 

 

Well, he won't cover the whole wall with a single sheet of glass, so there have to be dividers. Those dividers can be structural, which will support the end trusses

 

If that the case , you definitely do not want any sag in truss above it. 

 

Exactly. If there is any sag, it will break whatever glass is under it. However, more importantly, if the weight of the roof causes sagging, the trusses will eventually fail.

 

Earlier he did mention not following any plans for the truss design.    Double up on end trusses.. maybe enough ? Hard to say without knowing actual roof weight. Looking at pictures and std of work done there, I`m sure he is well aware.

 

The strength needed is vertical, not horizontal. Doubling the truss won't do much good. The part that I worry about is the bottom horizontal member of the trusses. They just don't look beefy enough (vertically) to me. The rest of the truss doesn't really need to be too beefy, but the way the truss is configured, all of the downward forces are directed to the center of the horizontal member. Like I said, if it fails, it would be catastrophic.

Edited by Headshot

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riklynbor

Hi again, love all the feedback i receive during the day.

I will try answer all questions. There will be a 100 x 100 steel supporting post mid way.

I listen to your feedback and i take it all in thank you.

The front truss must be deceptive as the base is 100 x 75 x 5mm RHS the outer frame is made of 50mm x 5 mm angle bar. The plan this far due to your concerns is to keep a active eye on the truss as we start loading on the panels starting at the rear.

I weigh 100kg and guess the other two pinoy workers would weigh 100kg together. All 3 of us were standing on the front truss while adjusting the webbed truss and bolting it in place without any feeling of weakness. I have build many trusses in Australia without any problems. 

Yes i am hoping to have folding glass doors at the front. It is only 7.2 meter wide opening.

If there is any sign of sag in the front truss I would sadly put in a central post but I am quietly confident in my truss. We shall see during the next week. I have 0 concerns about rear truss as it sits on a concrete beam 400 x250mm along its full length. I saw a mention of the roof slope and it is 1.5m over 4.0m.

 

post-14249-0-41296000-1406372430_thumb.jpg

 

post-14249-0-17202700-1406372475_thumb.jpg

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oztony

So would we say near enough to 20 degree pitch ?

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Hy H

 

 

I weigh 100kg and guess the other two pinoy workers would weigh 100kg together. All 3 of us were standing on the front truss while adjusting the webbed truss and bolting it in place without any feeling of weakness. I have build many trusses in Australia without any problems. 

 

Just seeing your location on side of a hill.  Looks great with unobstructed views.

 

 I think I was fairly close with my 20 degree guess for the pitch.

 

Mate not trying to tell you it will not hold but like HS mentioned it might be an idea to have someone calculate what your materials together in shape that they are would actually take as in weight.  Then add wind uplift / loading factor to it and double it for your exposed location. If I`m correct about your location it being very much within a pathway for local cyclonic conditions. 

 

Be a brick of a job to rectify it once you have loaded it up. Not to mention if it buckles the replace, rectify or worst case build again.

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