Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ancienrocka

Warning - Don't risk having no onward ticket when coming to the Philippines

Recommended Posts

ex231

Thanks paddy. The nearest consulate is about 1.5 hrs away but it might be worth a try. I will be getting the 3 months return ticket.

 

Here's my personal experience as a US traveler .. When I came to live in the PI I wasn't sure I'd stay so I had a return ticket for 7 months after arrival with no problems. I went back to the US with that ticket and returned to the PI 2 weeks later on a one way ticket to Manila and an "onward" ticket to Hong Kong (throw away) 8 months later. Korean Air was a little nervous about my throw away but decided that it was in fact an onward ticket and let me board. I've never heard of having to match ticket dates with visa extension dates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NOSOCALPINOY

Here's my personal experience as a US traveler .. When I came to live in the PI I wasn't sure I'd stay so I had a return ticket for 7 months after arrival with no problems. I went back to the US with that ticket and returned to the PI 2 weeks later on a one way ticket to Manila and an "onward" ticket to Hong Kong (throw away) 8 months later. Korean Air was a little nervous about my throw away but decided that it was in fact an onward ticket and let me board. I've never heard of having to match ticket dates with visa extension dates.

A friend of mine sent an email to the main BI in Manila and asked if the return and or onward ticket return date had to be within the 30 day free entry permit, 29 or 59 day visa expiration date!

Simple answer: NO! 

It's just a matter of convincing these stubborn airport airline representatives at the ticket check-in counter!

At times, it's still a frustrating 50/50 proposition if or not they will let you board your flight! Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topcat72m

Booked my initial 3 month return journey. The last leg of my inward bound flight is from Hong Kong to Cebu with Cathy Pacific if this information makes any difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topcat72m

Its not until the start of November so I think I have time to sort things yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hyaku

It has been mentioned before but bearing in mind we are told we can extend for three years........ no airline is going to sell us a ticket that far in advance anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Buko Beach

I always have a return ticket....I come in multiple times a year but have never been asked...I can only guess that you shouldn't look like someone who wants to overstay.

If you booked a round-trip ticket with the same airline the check-in staff can see the return ticket is valid with one confirmation code, so no need to ask.

 

If you booked two one-way tickets with separate confirmation numbers even if both flights are with the same airline, they will ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topcat72m

Im still not sure if I need a throw away ticket. I have a return ticket to and from Ireland connected in Hong Kong both directions with Cathay Pacific. They are almost 3 months apart.

Edited by topcat72m

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Woolf

Im still not sure if I need a throw away ticket. I have a return ticket to and from Ireland connected in Hong Kong both directions with Cathay Pacific. They are almost 3 months apart.

I have flown that route twice without return/onward ticket within the 21 days now 30 days

without any problem

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
topcat72m

I have flown that route twice without return/onward ticket within the 21 days now 30 days

without any problem

Thanks.

Edited by topcat72m

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mikala

 

 

If you booked a round-trip ticket with the same airline the check-in staff can see the return ticket is valid with one confirmation code, so no need to ask.

 

Unless you booked on Cebu-Pacific... They always ask for proof of my onward ticket and it's almost always a round-trip with them on the same long weekend.   :banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paddy

Im still not sure if I need a throw away ticket. I have a return ticket to and from Ireland connected in Hong Kong both directions with Cathay Pacific. They are almost 3 months apart.

Per Nosocalpinoy's post, there is at least one BI official who thinks the answer is "no - you don't need a throwaway ticket". Logic says you don't need one either. You have a return ticket with the "onward" flight 3 months after the "arrival" flight and you have the ability to extend your visa beyond the initial maximum 59 day period. However, there is no definitive publication from the BI, that I know of, that says "the onward/return ticket does not have to be within the validity of the initial visa". In fact, every document I have so far read simply says "must have an onward/return ticket" and stops there.

 

Many on this forum have experience with inconsistent interpretation of rules and regulations in the Philippines. Some, such as Woolf, have flown in with similar circumstances to you without having an onward ticket within the initial visa period and had no problems. You are unlikely to get any problems from Cathay Pacific - since they know they sold you a (changeable) return ticket. Cathay Pacific have never asked me about my visa, so they are likely not fussed as long as you have a return ticket.

 

If you have any doubts, my recommendation is to get one. If you have one, you will either need it and have it, or you will not need it. If you make sure it costs you less than US$20 it's not exactly a huge expense for a degree of peace of mind. Insurance if you wish.

 

If you don't have one - you risk meeting that one person whose interpretation is "different". Realistically, I consider the chances of this happening to be small - but it could depend on how you present yourself at the immigration desk in NAIA after 15+ hours of flying time from Ireland or whether you just happen to get a grumpy so-and-so. So far, I have never been asked to show my onward ticket when I have arrived but this is entirely within the discretion of the immigration official you deal with - as is the decision to allow you entry or not.

 

The answer is true Philippines...up to you sir :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ex231

 

 

every document I have so far read simply says "must have an onward/return ticket" and stops there.

 

An onward ticket is an onward ticket is an onward ticket .. The End

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paddy

An onward ticket is an onward ticket is an onward ticket .. The End

 

Sorry ex231 - that's your personal interpretation which may, or may not, agree with the most important person involved - the immigration person dealt with on arrival.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paddy

Just to be clear, I consider the chances of anyone being challenged on the basis of not having an onward ticket within the validity of their initial visa to be very small. The likely sequence of events is:

 

Traveler arrives at NAIA travelling on a 3 month return ticket with a passport but with no consulate issued 59 day visa and presents passport to immigration official

 

If the passport is visually kosher (I haven't seen many scanners at NAIA), will the immigration official ask to see the onward ticket?

 

No (the experience of many of us) - a 30 day visa on arrival is stamped in the passport and off the traveler goes to the carousel.The official may simply assume that the airline checked for the onward ticket because they know airlines don't like to be fined for this.

 

Yes (it happens).

 

If the onward ticket is dated after the expiry of the "about to be issued" visa, will the immigration official object?

 

No - if their interpretation of "onward ticket" matches ex231's or they can think logically and accept that either the visa can be extended or the ticket can be changed if necessary. From the experiences written about in this and other forums (fora?) we can assume that most immigration officials will take this position but we don't know that for sure despite Nosocalpinoy's email from the BI. If there's no objection to the return date, a 30 day visa is stamped in the passport and off the traveler goes to the carousel.

 

Yes - given the way the rule/regulation/law is written it is possible and while neither ex231 nor I agree with this particular interpretation it's not our interpretation that counts. At this point, the traveler is either able to "discuss" their way to a 30 day visa and the short walk to the carousel (a heated argument is not recommended) or is refused entry.

 

Our traveler in this case has a choice to make before setting out. Get a throwaway ticket or not. For a relatively small amount of money, our traveler can insure against meeting an immigration official whose interpretation of "onward ticket" means one within the validity of the initial visa. Whether they choose to spend that money, or not, depends on how much risk they think is involved. I think the risk is small, but non-zero.

 

My next trip will almost certainly match this and I will have the same decision to make. Unless the BI officially defines "onward ticket" and publishes that definition, I will look for, and buy, a cheap throwaway - which is cheaper than setting my return ticket to the period of the initial visa and then changing it (it cost me Cdn$238 to change my Cathay Pacific return and add two months. Cdn$50 for the change fee and Cdn$188 for the difference in fare between the original (May) and modified (July) return flight).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ex231

Sorry ex231 - that's your personal interpretation which may, or may not, agree with the most important person involved - the immigration person dealt with on arrival.

 

An onward ticket is just that and is indisputable. IF there was a requirement that the ticket had a travel date that corresponded with a 30 day or 59 day visa there would have to be a huge U Turn line back to where people came from. IF one encountered an immigration official that lacked common sense or maybe was just having a bad day you could ask him/her to quote the policy that he/she just pulled out of his/her ass. And of course they have supervisors who have supervisors who have supervisors.

 

 

*edit Leave out the "pulled out of their ass" part if you have to discuss this with the kind immigration official .. it would only go downhill from there :)

Edited by ex231

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Commercial Banner Advertisers

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..