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Gikabuhi ko

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sork

What does kabuhi ko or gikabuhi ko mean?

 

I thought kabuhi is life...

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Pinay_UK

GIKABUHI MEANS HEARTBURN

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Steve
What does kabuhi ko or gikabuhi ko mean?

 

I thought kabuhi is life...

 

 

kabuhi ko = My Life

 

not sure about the other. The wife's sleeping or else I'd ask her.

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caloy

Heartburn is right...

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Lee
What does kabuhi ko or gikabuhi ko mean?

 

I thought kabuhi is life...

 

 

Maybe you mean akong Kinabuhi which means my life.

 

They both mean heart burn the way you have them.

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Bob Ward

Kristine is experiencing kabuhi right now. Number one is that there is no direct translation to english. It is a a feeling in the epigastric region of the abdomen. It is a rapid palpatation that causes dizziness and cold sweats, among other symptoms. The remedy is to apply pressure at the point of origin. There are many other treatments from different regions of the Philippines but historically they bind the abdomen, hence applying pressure.

 

As was discussed in another thread, pasmo has many symptoms. Kabuhi is just one of them. There are many types of pasmo though.

 

Gikabuhi is an adverb that describes the feeling of kabuhi.

 

Thats all she has the energy to expound upon since she has been in class all day!

 

One thing you better get used to is that literal translations are many times impossible.

 

Next we will will discuss bughat. A more intense version of pasmo which results from over exertion and not eating properly, especially post partum.

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broden
Kristine is experiencing kabuhi right now. Number one is that there is no direct translation to english. It is a a feeling in the epigastric region of the abdomen. It is a rapid palpatation that causes dizziness and cold sweats, among other symptoms. The remedy is to apply pressure at the point of origin. There are many other treatments from different regions of the Philippines but historically they bind the abdomen, hence applying pressure.

 

As was discussed in another thread, pasmo has many symptoms. Kabuhi is just one of them. There are many types of pasmo though.

 

Gikabuhi is an adverb that describes the feeling of kabuhi.

 

Thats all she has the energy to expound upon since she has been in class all day!

 

One thing you better get used to is that literal translations are many times impossible.

 

Next we will will discuss bughat. A more intense version of pasmo which results from over exertion and not eating properly, especially post partum.

bob you got backup on this ... my wife was saying the same thing as she was running out the door to work .. including the no direct translation part ...

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Mike S

10/4 on the exact translations ....... it is really funny to watch Julie try and explain something to me in English from a Tagalog word that has no meaning but rather a feeling ..... she will try and try and finally say "you know what I mean" .............. :P:D ...... at that point I know there is no direct translation ...... and no real good way to explain it ....... but she will eventually find an explanation ...... sometimes hours later after she has thought about it for a while .......

 

The same in any language ....... OMG .... I would hate to try and learn English after speaking another for so long ..... :):lol: :lol:

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janus

yes thats right, there is no direct translation nor medical term. even filipino doctors doesnt believe it nor any medical treatment can be done. however local old folks just apply pressure on the gastric area and wrap the waist with a piece of cloth making it like a belt. persons who had this should avoid or change electric fan position away from them.

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misty
however local old folks just apply pressure on the gastric area and wrap the waist with a piece of cloth making it like a belt.

 

Some even spat on their hands and rub it on affected areas. :P

 

:D

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Good Samaritan

I thought 'gikabuhi' only meant nauseated!....and I am a full-blooded BISDAK (Bisayang Dako) at that!...tsk tsk :P

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AngelofBroden
I thought 'gikabuhi' only meant nauseated!....and I am a full-blooded BISDAK (Bisayang Dako) at that!...tsk tsk :as-if:

 

Hahaha, shame on you Good :lol: Joke aside though, it's good that you don't know what it is.. it is very unsettling and often very painful. I used to have it when I was in the Philippines and then some after I got here. It only ever stopped after I got rid of my gallbladder!! And yeah, when you have kabuhi, the fan is a no no, neither is an a/c. For some reason cold air intensifies the condition and makes you more clammy and nauseated. When I had it I would lay flat on a hard surface as the pain shoots through to the back. I have been trying to look up the English word for kabuhi but no luck thus far. Same with urom or bangungot although bangungot usually or should I say ordinarily translates to nightmare. Oh okay, didn't mean to introduce another tricky vocabulary!! :lol:

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Bob Ward

GS, me thinks it's just because you are a city girl. LOL

 

bob you got backup on this ... my wife was saying the same thing as she was running out the door to work .. including the no direct translation part ...

 

Duhh!

 

Thats all she has the energy to expound upon since she has been in class all day!

 

Mostly I'm really glad about this thread because in the beginning I though Kristine was kind of making it up. This was mainly because of the nebulous description, varying symptoms and non existent translation. As usual, she is right!

Edited by Bob Ward

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Daisy

Although I consider myself lucky that in my age I never have an instance that I felt "gikabuhi ko". I always hear friends saying it and I will often told them, if you feel like that at your age now (usually they are younger than me), it will get worst when you're older! Bob, it is not good to put pressure on it according to the oldies! But then, we are in different region as Kristine. The best remedy for us is to drink and eat malunggay soup with lemon grass and spices not cook in oil. After a few minutes, one will start burping and the "kabuhi" is gone, cured.

Edited by Daisy

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kriz

Too late for this, but "kabuhi" means "nausea". Gikabuhi = nauseated

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