Jump to content

Long term care in Cebu City?


Recommended Posts

Edit the $35K a month to read per year, but I'm sure it would have been understood that way. $35K a year would still be a bargain and or probably could be slightly more than that per year! The website doesn't mention the costs of any of their plans.   

Yes it was $35K/year. I saw a report on 60 minutes (I think) about this place last time I was across the pond. That was the cost they gave for full support of a patient with dementia with 1 staff assigned to 1 and only 1 patient.

 

BTW, retirement visas are easy in Thailand. Prove finances or deposit about $30k in a bank account, pay your yearly fee of about $60 and get a 1 year visa. You can spend from the $30k after you get the visa.  Multiple entry visas are extra.

 

I've tried to find a link to the segment but no luck yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

i did read the Philippines was trying to or already did have a special visa for very old ,,, We tossed around a few times opening up a care home in cebu but i think i will leave that to the next generation .. care homes in the Philippines there a few... cost seems to run from 800 a month us for basically a room to 1,800 month for full time assisted living with care givers etc  We have a great big lot for the project but reality is why start a new business at this stage in my life..

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
lopburi3

Be aware that is an exceptionally high priced facility - more reasonable places are available in Thailand and more are opening.  In Bangkok believe about $1,000 per month for some designed for less flash.  It is fairly new here so would not expect there is much regulation yet.  See no reason that there would not be some available in Philippines - do not believe they are any more family than Thailand and they have a good number of health care workers available.  

 

Yearly stay in Thailand requires either 800k baht in bank account 3 months each year or proof of 65k per month income.

Link to post
Share on other sites
ellenbrook2001

my DAUGHTER have a power of attorney if i end up in a bad way shes will come to take me back to the AUSSIE land then go to nursing home no choice no way my gf or wife will do the dirty work clean me up or changed my nappy grrrrrrrrrrr that me .my apology but do not trust them here .

Link to post
Share on other sites
David_LivinginTalisay

When my Mum had Dementia / Alzheimer, she was not too bad in 2005 when I went to the UK for my 50th Birthday.

 

One day I asked her "Do you know who I am?" and she replied "Of course you are my eldest, my son David!"

A day or two later, I asked to same question and got " Ahh, umm, is your name Susan?"

 

2 years later in 2007, I could hardly recognise her, as that warm, cuddly, smiling Mother that I remembered  her as.  She had lost a lot of weight, her eyes seemed sunk back into her head.   She looked 'lost', and confused!

That was the last time I saw her, as she died in late October last year.   My sister Susan said it was a good thing in some ways that I not see her go downhill and deteriorate.   If that is what happens to you in so called Care Homes and Nursing Homes in the UK, you can keep them.

 

I know Sha-Sha will look after me, and hire the right Nurses to help her if I end up like my Mum.

 

I seriously looked into the cost of bring my Mum to the Philippines, and hiring 2-3 x Trained Care Givers to look after her, but could not get the agreement of my Dad and my 2 brothers and 2 sisters. It was cheaper than what the UK Government was taking from the sales of my Dad's house when he moved into a Warden Assist Retirement Home in Christchurch, Bournemouth in Dorset, UK.

It's after she had a fall that there was an inquiry, that declared the Care Home was no looking after our Mum  properly and they moved her into a Proper Nursing Home.  That is when the cost of her care really shot up.  That is until there was no real money left, and was reduced to what her State Pension covered.

 

The full new State Pension will be no less than £148.40 per week. The actual amount will be set in autumn 2015. 
That is an average of 
£644.83 per month (PHP48,123.59).   

Not sure if total Costs of looking after someone in the Philippines could be done for that UK State Pension!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator
Salty Dog

When my father looked into living in an assisted care facility in Florida back around 2005 it was about $2,500 a month for a really nice place.  Unlike a nursing home, he could have a car and come and go whenever he wanted. The apartments 500-600 sqft, were large studios with a bed, a sitting area, a small kitchen and private bath. Being assisted ment they made sure he took his meds, they cleaned his apartment, provide 3 meals a day in a nice dining room washed his clothes on so on. If he needed additional care like getting in and out of bed, taking a shower or using the bathroom, that was a different level of care and cost more, closer to say $3,000. He was making about $1,800 a month retirement and had enough in savings to stay there for over 10 years before he would run out of cash, not even taking into account future earnings on his savings. His medical was already covered 100% including drugs so no surprise cost there. Of course if he didn't have any money, then medicaid would have paid for it.

 

I thought the places we looked at were nice, but at 70, he would have been one of the younger people there. He tried to stay in his own home a little longer than he should have and ended up living with me for his final years. He had some slight dementia, mostly drug induced from all the drugs he had to take for parkinson's disease which he had since his early 50's. I had already retired so we were pretty much together 24/7. Even though he could do many things for himself, it was still difficult at times since his Parkinson's was pretty advanced by then. He could no longer drive and that was I think the hardest thing for him to give up. In fact he didn't. He thought he had lost his license and when he went to get a replacement, the DMV saw him and said no way do you get a drivers license without a doctor's clearance. That was never going to happen although he tried to get one.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
David_LivinginTalisay

I posted 

 

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/topic/72826-beauty-is-in-the-eye-of-the-beholder-but-depends-which-country/#entry845233

 

The Journalist that did the Photoshopped Photo in 22 Countries also did a REPORT on her own experience of her Father needing full time Care as his Alzheimer’s 

 

http://www.estherhonig.com/#!Giving-Care/cyh4/BB81BC75-3046-4841-9461-906AB9702EB6

 

Giving Care

The irony of Alzheimer’s is that the diagnosed individual is often times oblivious to their own circumstances—instead it’s their caretakers who suffer. According toa study by Ohio State University, the chronic stress that spouses develop while caring for Alzheimer’s patients may shorten the caregivers’ lives by as much as four to eight years.

 

Since his diagnosis five years ago, my father’s mental capacity has continued to wither and the stress on my mother has increased exponentially. In addition to working a fulltime job that barely covers the cost of my father’s care, she must manage their finances, maintain their failing real-estate investment and manage her and my father’s lives and surmounting medical issues.

 

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, in 2012, 15.4 million caregivers like my mom provided more than 17.5 billion hours of unpaid care. Due to the physical and emotional toll, those caretakers had $9.1 billion in additional healthcare costs of their own last year.

 

After raising two children and holding down a begrudged career for the past 30 years, I had always hoped my mom would find rest and happiness in her retirement. Unfortunately, she has been the primary earner for our house for the past nine years and the circumstances are such that not only is she still working fulltime at age 63, but her savings and sanity will, no doubt, be absorbed by my father’s illness.

 

 

read more ....

Link to post
Share on other sites
David_LivinginTalisay

I posted 

 

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/topic/72826-beauty-is-in-the-eye-of-the-beholder-but-depends-which-country/#entry845233

 

The Journalist that did the Photoshopped Photo in 22 Countries also did a REPORT on her own experience of her Father needing full time Care as his Alzheimer’s 

 

http://www.estherhonig.com/#!Giving-Care/cyh4/BB81BC75-3046-4841-9461-906AB9702EB6

 

Giving Care

The irony of Alzheimer’s is that the diagnosed individual is often times oblivious to their own circumstances—instead it’s their caretakers who suffer. According toa study by Ohio State University, the chronic stress that spouses develop while caring for Alzheimer’s patients may shorten the caregivers’ lives by as much as four to eight years.

 

Since his diagnosis five years ago, my father’s mental capacity has continued to wither and the stress on my mother has increased exponentially. In addition to working a fulltime job that barely covers the cost of my father’s care, she must manage their finances, maintain their failing real-estate investment and manage her and my father’s lives and surmounting medical issues.

 

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, in 2012, 15.4 million caregivers like my mom provided more than 17.5 billion hours of unpaid care. Due to the physical and emotional toll, those caretakers had $9.1 billion in additional healthcare costs of their own last year.

 

After raising two children and holding down a begrudged career for the past 30 years, I had always hoped my mom would find rest and happiness in her retirement. Unfortunately, she has been the primary earner for our house for the past nine years and the circumstances are such that not only is she still working fulltime at age 63, but her savings and sanity will, no doubt, be absorbed by my father’s illness.

 

 

read more ....

Link to post
Share on other sites

An interesting thread.

@D_D, can you advise what approximately is the cost of 24/7 care. I assume one would need three nurses to allow time off etc.

tks

 

My mother and I don't charge to take care of my Father.

 

The care taker from the VA comes to help 2 times a week and is free because my Father is 100 percent disabled from loosing his hearing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

Be aware that is an exceptionally high priced facility - more reasonable places are available in Thailand and more are opening.  In Bangkok believe about $1,000 per month for some designed for less flash.  It is fairly new here so would not expect there is much regulation yet.  See no reason that there would not be some available in Philippines - do not believe they are any more family than Thailand and they have a good number of health care workers available.  

 

Yearly stay in Thailand requires either 800k baht in bank account 3 months each year or proof of 65k per month income.

well its all about family i mean what is the point of going to Thailand if your family is in the Philippines just makes it hard on them

Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

most people in care homes where they need 24/7  and help dressing and getting cleaned up are SELF pay... medicare will pay if your broke but you must be broke first and they only pay like the va i think 1,200 a month and that dont get you much in a assisted living home... Arizona has lots of them from 1,800 a month where you share a room and its basically a house to 5,000 month own room , phone , tv etc.. on the phone the one my wife worked at had to un plug the phone at night some of the residents were calling 911 to report late pizza delivery or broken tv.. or light not working

Link to post
Share on other sites
lopburi3

well its all about family i mean what is the point of going to Thailand if your family is in the Philippines just makes it hard on them

I was not making that recommendation - only answering a post and someone asking about stay requirements and pointing out it was something new here but starting to become available.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..