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Veco’s net-metering encourages solar generation, power savings


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Woolf

Cebu Daily News

 

http://cebudailynews.inquirer.net/2014/06/24/vecos-net-metering-encourages-solar-generation-power-savings/

 

Veco’s net-metering encourages solar generation, power savings


By Aileen Garcia-Yap
1:56 am | Tuesday, June 24th, 2014


The initiative of the Visayan Electric Company to encourage the private sector and home consumers in energy saving has been lauded by the Department of Energy, not just as pioneering but also helping plug the thin power reserves in the Visayas Grid.

Aside from the Cebu Unplugged, VECO chief operating officer Sebastian Lacson also introduced the net-metering system through solar energy generation which he described as “sexy business” that anyone can do in their homes.

Under this program, those who generate their own electricity, either partially or in whole, can feed in their excess or unused power to Veco. This program has been encouraging consumers to install solar panels in their homes, to save on power cost at the same time decreasing demand from the grid which has been experiencing volatile power supply.

“Anything you generate, you sell it to VECO (Visayan Electric Co.),” Lacson said.

The system will only require one to install four panels to generate one kilowatt power which will be installed on the roof.

“The panels occupy only eight square meters and is not that heavy. The solar power is then transmitted to an inverter where the direct current is converted to alternating current which you can use and the extra generated capacity you can sell to VECO,” he said.

The system will have to be integrated to the grid for VECO to buy the extra generated energy at P5.6 per kilowatt hour.

Lacson said they have installed these systems at Councilor Nestor Archival’s home as well as Cebu Business Club president Gordon Alan Joseph.

“Governor (Hilario) Davide III will also be installing one in his home. ROI (return on investment) is at a high 12.3 percent within seven to eight years,” Lacson said.

Lacson added that through the system individual households can already participate in the energy play and assist in the economic development of the country through power generation.

Energy Undersecretary Raul V. Aguilos lauded this initiative of Veco.

“We all know that the consumption of energy increases with economic growth and now we have pegged demand growth rate at 6 to 7 percent annually. While we have many power plants in the pipeline, conservation and putting in place efficiency measures will allow us to use the saved energy for more developments,” he said in an interview after the forum.

Aguilos lauded Veco’s advocacy of having the business sector participate not just in energy conservation but also in generation, saying it should also be done in other parts of the country.

Based on a report by Gerardo B. Castro of DOE Central Visayas, the Cebu-Negros-Panay grid has a total dependable capacity of 1,628 MW and a peak demand of 1,572 MW as of June 19.

“That only leaves us with 56 MW surplus which is very thin. We need people to help conserve energy to get pass this critical period without brownouts which causes more loss to us economically,” said Aguilos.

He added that Cebu for example has an embedded capacity of 585 MW and a peak demand of 768 MW or 48.9 percent of the grid’s demand.

“Cebu will need more embedded capacity to be able to supply its own and not rely on imported power. We have projects in the pipeline though that should help.”

Castro said Visayas has a committed power projects of 587.6 MW and indicative projects with 775 MW until 2016.
 

Edited by Woolf
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Paul
“The panels occupy only eight square meters and is not that heavy.

 

iffin' my figers r ko-rect here, we are talking about 186 101 pounds at most, or about 46 kilos, for the entire array, that is.

 

But, would a nipa roof hold that sort of weight?

Edited by Paul
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Cipro

They pay retail or wholesale?

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thebob

iffin' my figers r ko-rect here, we are talking about 186 pounds at most, or about 46 kilos, for the entire array, that is.

 

But, would a nipa roof hold that sort of weight?

 

Sure it would. 45 kilo guys climb up there to fix them!

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Woolf

 

 

we are talking about 186 pounds at most, or about 46 kilos,

 

??????????

 

186 pounds = 84.37 kg

46 kg  =  101.41 pounds

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Paul

Sorry. I was tired and estimating in my mind.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello! Anybody has any  news about the same possibility offered by CEBECO?

I'd like to install solar panels in the next future but i don't wanna have the burden of batteries, i'd prefer a straight grid connected system

Thanks!

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Paul

To my knowledge, it is only VECO. Perhaps all of CEBECO will follow through after? Not sure. 

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Woolf

There are CEBECO I, CEBECO II and CEBECO III

you may have to contact them for information

 

 

CEBECO I

 

http://www.erc.gov.ph/pages/Cebu-I-Electric-Cooperative-Inc

 

 

CEBECO II

 

http://www.erc.gov.ph/pages/Cebu-II-Electric-Cooperative-Inc

 

 

CEBECO III

 

http://www.erc.gov.ph/pages/Cebu-III-Electric-Cooperative-Inc

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Headshot

They pay retail or wholesale?

 

Well...up to the point where they meter shows you generated more than you used, they would have no choice but to pay retail...since your meter would spin backwards and they couldn't charge you for electricity flow unless the meter shows it. They could only charge for the monthly electrical shortfall of your solar system (that electricity that you used beyond what your solar system could produce). If you did generate more than you used in a month, then the surplus production would likely be purchased by the utility at wholesale prices.

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Woolf

Please read the op again

 

The system will have to be integrated to the grid for VECO to buy the extra generated energy at P5.6 per kilowatt hour.

 

 

I guess they will install 2 meters

 

btw my meter is now a electronic digital one

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Jim in Cebu

Has anyone gotten detailed information about VECO's offer and seriously evaluated it?  If so, please share your specific thoughts and concerns about it.  

 

(There was a general discussion about solar power and various utility company implementations recently at http://www.livingincebuforums.com/topic/72140-veco-offers-solar-power-to-public/ before we got sidetracked into a discussion about floating voltages.)

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  • 4 weeks later...
Knowdafish

 

 

The system will have to be integrated to the grid for VECO to buy the extra generated energy at P5.6 per kilowatt hour.

 

That is very cheap. Such a deal - they buy it from you wholesale and turn around and charge you retail. 

 

Noreco here on Negros also will buy back electricity that is solar generated but at what rate I do not know. 

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Mikala

That is very cheap. Such a deal - they buy it from you wholesale and turn around and charge you retail. 

 

Noreco here on Negros also will buy back electricity that is solar generated but at what rate I do not know. 

 

It's typical of the utilities in America too. I used to be the engineering supervisor in Hawaii and I often had to explain that we paid market rate for the power from Solar, Hydro and Biofuel producers, but that we, as a utility, had to pay for the distribution and transmission lines. Usually, small solar setups on houses and even businesses did not produce more than they consumed. With that low of a price, it was not cost-effective to produce more than you consumed, expecially not in Hawaii (unless it was hydro).

 

That being said, there is a BIG push in Hawaii for folks installing solar electric and hot water. The price of oil can only go higher and higher, the local utility relies on burning bunker fuel and sometimes large diesel generators. It's smart to go with solar.

 

In the Philippines, I'd go with solar off-grid just to avoid the uncertainties of the grid.

Edited by Mikala
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fred42

Well...up to the point where they meter shows you generated more than you used, they would have no choice but to pay retail...since your meter would spin backwards and they couldn't charge you for electricity flow unless the meter shows it. They could only charge for the monthly electrical shortfall of your solar system (that electricity that you used beyond what your solar system could produce). If you did generate more than you used in a month, then the surplus production would likely be purchased by the utility at wholesale prices.

 

 

Actually,this is not always the case.

My meter and many other modern fitted meters here these days are digital which do not run backwards..

There is a law somewhere that says that any power company in the R.P must allow permission for a solar grid tie..

One of the requirements include an import and an export meter.

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