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Start of the School Year


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rainymike

Here's what I went through to get my kids into this school year.

 

1. Tuition - plunked down about 12K per kid. This is a private school and about middle of the road in cost. Possible to find a lot more expensive or cheaper. My strategy was to find a school that did its job properly at the best price.

 

2. Uniforms - school uniforms, PE uniforms, scouting uniforms, shoes. The school sells them, but we usually buy at the local malls like a Gaisano or NCCC rather than an SM. For the girl, we buy the fabric and have a tailor make the skirt. Estimate the cost at about 1.2K per kid.

 

3. Requirements - all the necessary folders, tablets, pencils, school bag, etc. The school provides a list for each kid. We hunt and peck. We also do this at the more local malls. Hardest item to find was a plastic folder with clasp with a picture of a popular cartoon character.on it. Figure about 1K per kid.

 

4. Books - about 5 paperback books (English, Filipino, math, science, social studies, values) per kid. About 3-4K per kid. Purchased from school directly. Also had to find a New International Version bible (couldn't just swipe a Gideon's from a hotel room).

 

5. Kids End of Summer party - my partner organizes a small outing with a couple of other classmate families. We go to a nice resort, do an outdoor barbecue. We prepare a lot of food because we usually get a ride home from the locals (LOL ... I think they pity the poor foreigner who doesn't have a car). My contribution to that was bringing a big bag of Cheetos. The Cheetos was a big hit. About 1K total for food and entry fees to the resort.

 

We've done this enough to have a good feel for what to buy or not to buy. This was multiple trips over several weeks to get everything lined up.

 

6. School Orientation: Dreaded event. Principal speaks for an hour. She and I are actually on the same page, but she takes an hour to say what I can say in two minutes. Don't spoil the kid, know your role and responsibilities as a parent, teach the kids respect, don't abandon the kid to a yaya, etc. When she's done, she gives a prize to the first 10 parents who arrived on time (Tupperware item) - yeap this is one school that doesn't like to run on pinoy time and uses behavior techniques to reward proper parental behavior.

 

7. Classroom Orientation: each kid has a classroom orientation. My partner and I split up. I still don't speak the lingo, but pretty much know what's going on. Main item on the agenda are elections. Parents are selected for president, veep, treasurer, etc for each class. LOL ... I'm nominated for president ... and plead ignorance of the language. The vote goes to someone else to my relief.

 

8. Lesson Plan: now the rubber hits the road. We're provided with a lesson plan for the week. Specific assignment for each day are provided. The weekly assessment day is laid out. We know what the kid is studying, what they're supposed to know, and when they will be evaluated. School's message - get involved with learning.

 

Overall, I can't say I have many beefs with the school. The curriculum is pretty solid. The books are not fancy hard cover texts, but are pretty good in content. The school is not the fanciest around, but I'm comfortable with what's going on in the classroom The entire process requires parental involvement, so when I feel there are deficiencies, it's not so hard to fill in the gaps. The library is barely adequate, so we've purchased a second computer for internet access. 

 

Boils down to what is the kid learning and are they learning it. So far the outcomes are to my satisfaction. I do want to push the non-academics more. The oldest boy needs more confidence and drive. Stuff like that seems the more pressing issues for me than whether they can add or write. Overall, I'm pretty satisfied my kids' school experience in the Phils.

 

 

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Headshot

What grades (or levels) are your children in?

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Majorsco

Pretty close to what I experience for my kids in private school in Dapitan city, except our tuition costs are almost half, closer to 6k.   We don't have all the formality of the classroom and school orientations, but there are a few other fees (for trainer and costumes) for what they call the LITMUS, which is the literary/musical event (singing, dancing, recitations, playing instruments, etc.) that all the kids participate in closer to Christmas.  The prep for this goes on for about a month before the event along with their other classwork.

 

The one thing you get that I'd like to get, but don't, is the lesson plan for the week.  

 

I too am satisfied with the result.  My kids are in second and fifth grade and will stay at this school through 12th grade.  Our private school is also a college, but I don't know if they'll go to that one or somewhere else since it has a limited course offering and my kids don't yet know what they want.

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Davaoeno

What school did you chose ?  [ if you dont want to post that I understand and will ask you by PM.  we have a 5 year old we just went thru the selection process with ]

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Thanks Mike. Your summary gives a good breakdown for comparison. Of course, every school is slightly different.

 

1. Tuition - plunked down about 12K per kid. This is a private school and about middle of the road in cost. Possible to find a lot more expensive or cheaper. My strategy was to find a school that did its job properly at the best price.

 

Ours was a bit more...26k for the school year.

 

2. Uniforms - school uniforms, PE uniforms, scouting uniforms, shoes. The school sells them, but we usually buy at the local malls like a Gaisano or NCCC rather than an SM. For the girl, we buy the fabric and have a tailor make the skirt. Estimate the cost at about 1.2K per kid.

 

Uniforms came to about 1.8k for our daughter. They were all pre-made with the school emblems on them.

 

3. Requirements - all the necessary folders, tablets, pencils, school bag, etc. The school provides a list for each kid. We hunt and peck. We also do this at the more local malls. Hardest item to find was a plastic folder with clasp with a picture of a popular cartoon character on it. Figure about 1K per kid.

 

The school standardizes the school supplies, so every child has the same, and provides it all in a plastic packet...which we then had to buy. I'm not sure what the cost was because my wife paid. That didn't stop my wife from buying more school supplies, but my wife and daughter have "study time" everyday in addition to school, where my wife tutors our daughter (my wife is a certified elementary teacher), so it is put to good use.

 

4. Books - about 5 paperback books (English, Filipino, math, science, social studies, values) per kid. About 3-4K per kid. Purchased from school directly. Also had to find a New International Version bible (couldn't just swipe a Gideon's from a hotel room).

 

That was the same, except we didn't have to buy a Bible.

 

5. Kids End of Summer party - my partner organizes a small outing with a couple of other classmate families. We go to a nice resort, do an outdoor barbecue. We prepare a lot of food because we usually get a ride home from the locals (LOL ... I think they pity the poor foreigner who doesn't have a car). My contribution to that was bringing a big bag of Cheetos. The Cheetos was a big hit. About 1K total for food and entry fees to the resort.

 

We had a house warming party for our remodeled house instead. I couldn't have afforded another party.

 

6. School Orientation: Dreaded event. Principal speaks for an hour. She and I are actually on the same page, but she takes an hour to say what I can say in two minutes. Don't spoil the kid, know your role and responsibilities as a parent, teach the kids respect, don't abandon the kid to a yaya, etc. When she's done, she gives a prize to the first 10 parents who arrived on time (Tupperware item) - yeap this is one school that doesn't like to run on pinoy time and uses behavior techniques to reward proper parental behavior.

 

7. Classroom Orientation: each kid has a classroom orientation. My partner and I split up. I still don't speak the lingo, but pretty much know what's going on. Main item on the agenda are elections. Parents are selected for president, veep, treasurer, etc for each class. LOL ... I'm nominated for president ... and plead ignorance of the language. The vote goes to someone else to my relief.

 

Nope. If you want to know something at the school, just ask. However, pretty much all information you might want to know is in the school's "student handbook."

 

8. Lesson Plan: now the rubber hits the road. We're provided with a lesson plan for the week. Specific assignment for each day are provided. The weekly assessment day is laid out. We know what the kid is studying, what they're supposed to know, and when they will be evaluated. School's message - get involved with learning.

 

Each student has a school diary. It is used by the teacher for lesson plans, notes to parents, assignments and evaluations. It comes home with the student every day, and the parents are expected to look in it to keep up on their child's education and needs. My wife uses it when she is tutoring my daughter, so she is already familiar with the classwork before she gets to school.

 

Really, what is important to us is that she gets to socialize with children her own age, and that she develops some more patience and maybe some ability to stay on task. Of course, we work on those things at home too.

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Salty Dog

I'm curious about the one subject called values.

 

It would be interesting to see what they teach in that respect.

 

I was wondering if it's religious values, social values or something else?

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I'm curious about the one subject called values.

 

It would be interesting to see what they teach in that respect.

 

I was wondering if it's religious values, social values or something else?

 

It depends on the school.

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rainymike

What grades (or levels) are your children in?

Youngest just starting nursery (age 2 but 3 yrs old in a few months). Then kindergarten, 2nd grade, 3rd grade.

 

I've read elsewhere that the schools are fine at the early ages. Perhaps less so beyond elementary. Will have to just keep my eyes open. Anyway, it's why I'm trying to stress the non-academic skills and abilities right now. Hopefully, it will help carry the kids through the later years.

What school did you chose ?  [ if you dont want to post that I understand and will ask you by PM.  we have a 5 year old we just went thru the selection process with ]

LOL ... yea, PM please. I want to remain under the radar.

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rainymike

Major and Headshot, seems that our experiences are similar. Maybe that's a good sign. I know our campus has to go through some kind of a Department of Ed review. Even had people coming on campus last year to assess the kids. It's still not perfect, but perhaps moving in the right direction. Anyway, I'm in it for the long haul. Will put the kids through the system here.

 

Salty - as for the values subject, I'm sending the kids to a religious school. So the values are tied to religion.For the young kids, I find that more of a plus than a minus. Emphasis on Christian values of respecting others, respect for parents, helping the family, working hard. Pretty much in line with what I'm trying to teach them. It makes my job easier when the school and I are in alignment on core values. They approach it from the word of God, I approach it from my agnostic perceptions of ethical behavior. There is a surprising amount of overlap. There are differences of course, but at their young age, those core values are what I'm concerned about.  

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Majorsco

 

 

I know our campus has to go through some kind of a Department of Ed review. Even had people coming on campus last year to assess the kids.

 

That is a regular part of Dep Ed's job.  I know one Dep Ed manager who visits our local universities.   He's my nieces boyfriend.  In his case he goes to all colleges and universities in the region to assess and follow up on maritime degree and civil engineering degree programs.  He comes and talks to the schools about those programs about once a quarter.  I know because I've been invited to some of the dinner parties he's held with the university presidents and program directors from the ones in my area.

 

He told me there are similar inspections and assessments for other schools and school programs.  Dep Ed takes a very proactive approach to the schools that are accredited. My kids school get reviewed from time to time as well.  That's a good thing.

 

My kids school is a Catholic school.  They don't have a subject called values, but they do provide religious education which includes values.  They just don't call it values, it's called religion in our school.

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My daughter is in 9th grade at San Carlos, about the same system.
36k a year, 4.5K books. I bought uniforms 800 per set.
They also have a special gala uniform that they use on special occasions.

There are also school transport arrangements 1.3K monthly, but I deliver and pick myself. I also deliver lunch to her almost daily, she is not allowed to bring  lunch in the morning from me. The food will be destroyed without proper storage for so many hours.

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Majorsco

 

 

They also have a special gala uniform that they use on special occasions.

 

My daughter has one of these too which she wears to Mass and anything church related, not just the religion subjects.

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BossHog

What surprised me this year is the students aren't getting any books (public school)

 

The teachers say the DepEd isn't supplying them with books this year.

 

I asked for the titles so I could buy them myself.

 

Principal said it wouldn't be fair to the other students.

 

Never heard of going to high school without any books.

 

Confusing.

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rainymike

 

 

Principal said it wouldn't be fair to the other students.

 

Public schools are in tough shape. Perhaps if the parents got organized and purchased at least some books for sharing, things might move in the right direction. Many publics are doubling up - taking half a class in the morning. The other half in the afternoon. Is this a consequence of the last big hurricane or political fallout from something or another?

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Majorsco

In our Bgy, we haven't heard anything about no books for the public schools.  Why don't they just use last year's books?  Did they disappear?

 

For private, they change books every three years at my kids school.  Of course we have to buy the books.  Some parents just go to a Xerox place and copy the books they borrowed from someone else.  

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