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Veco offers solar power to public


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Woolf

SunStar

 

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/local-news/2014/06/08/veco-offers-solar-power-public-347232

 

Veco offers solar power to public

 

Sunday, June 8, 2014


THE Visayan Electric Co. has announced its promotion of clean energy through the “Veco Solar” power that will also save money for consumers.

Veco’s franchise area covers the cities of Naga, Talisay, Cebu, Mandaue and Lapu-Lapu, and the municipalities of Minglanilla, Consolacion, Liloan and Cordova.

Sebastian Lacson, Veco chief operating officer, said that in partnership with Enfinity, homeowners and businesses can have solar energy installation at an initial investment of P150,000.

Veco is the first and only power distribution firm that pushed for the program, which is also called “Green Energy for a Brighter Future.”

Veco Solar is aimed at helping the government protect the environment against pollution and power consumers reduce power consumption.

Veco chose to partner with Enfinity because it is one of the leading developers of solar photovoltaic projects in the world.

Lacson said homeowners and building owners only need eight to 10 square meters of rooftop for the installation of solar panels that can produce one kilowatt hour of electricity from Veco Solar.

Since the solar panels weigh 20 kilos per square meter, homeowners must make sure their rooftop is strong.

The solar panels, which are made of recycled materials, are expected to last for more than 30 years.

Lacson said experts estimated that it will take seven years for the homeowners to recover the P150,000 investment but this period may be reduced if the photovoltaic (PV) system will effectively harness enough power from the sun.

Consumer

This means that if a power consumer will invest this year, he can consume P150,000 worth of electricity from 2014 to 2021.

He will reap the profit beyond 2021 up to the next 23 years or more.

Lacson said a power consumer’s electric bill will go down once his solar energy starts operating.

If his consumption is low, any excess that comes from the solar energy will automatically go to the power grid and will be distributed to the other consumers and Veco will pay for it, hence, an income for the consumer.

He said that if a family is on vacation, all the power derived from their solar system will go to the power grid and it will be a source of family income because this will be paid for by Veco.

 

 

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SunStar   http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/local-news/2014/06/08/veco-offers-solar-power-public-347232   Veco offers solar power to public   By Elias O. Baquero Sunday, June 8, 2014 THE Visaya

I would be so into this if a) cebeco III was doing it (Toledo)  and b) if there was a 2 or 3kw option.  We spend 6 months in oz and 6 months here.  Oz place generates more than we use annually so we g

The offer sounds interesting (at a superficial level)...  However, I'd sure want to know a whole lot more before investing.   One of my concerns would be maintenance and durability of a system that

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Paul

Not too bad of a deal for a 1 Kilowatt rated grid-tied array. 

 

What's that about, 135 to 150 kWh per month?

 

I think a more realistic return on investment would be around 9.25 years.

Edited by Paul
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big RB

In Idaho they set up a lot of private home systems with meters that run backwards, and promised a return of a rather large upfront investment after a few years. But when the Obama administration redirected the federal money that the state was getting to states that voted for Obama, only about 2 years into the program, the subsidy folded. Unfortunately the solar power in Idaho is not going to the grid when it is most needed, the coldest time of day, about 10 months of the year. So it is nearly worthless there to the utilities. So they just stopped reversing the meters. After all, these are rich people who could afford this in the first place. So I would not trust the numbers, and the buy back guarantees too much. 1kw hour per hour? or per day? Can you power your aircon? 1kw divided by 220 equals the amps. But then that is during sunshine, not at night.

    I think a separate aircon that runs on solar only might be nice to supplement the A/C in the heat of the day. But these scams got a bad history so far.

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poby

I would be so into this if a) cebeco III was doing it (Toledo)  and b) if there was a 2 or 3kw option.  We spend 6 months in oz and 6 months here.  Oz place generates more than we use annually so we get a cheque every year and would love to have the same deal here. 

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Jim in Cebu

The offer sounds interesting (at a superficial level)...  However, I'd sure want to know a whole lot more before investing.

 

One of my concerns would be maintenance and durability of a system that is connected to the VECO power grid:   The power in our area (Canduman, Mandaue City) is really dirty (that is, sags, spikes, unbalanced lines, etc.)   I know very little about solar power to grid interfaces, but I am concerned that a dirty grid could easily lead to the premature failure of the solar array's electronics -- which probably aren't cheap.  I assume that there would be no useful warranties on anything here.  Do we have any solar power/grid experts here that can confirm or refute my concerns regarding a dirty grid?

 

A second area of concern is what additional things and costs would be involved with the install and maintenance.

 

A third area of concern is how the VECO purchase plan would work:  In the US, some utilities buy power at retail while others only pay wholesale (meaning, the home solar producer "sells low" when he is producing excess power and "buys high" from the utility when he needs additional power.  The difference in pricing models makes a major difference in cost-effectiveness.

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      We are going to be upgrading to a new roof in December, and I am considering installing the proper framework for solar panels at that time. Then, after the renovation is done, build up a solar panel array to power a totally separate set of circuits. These circuits to run roof ventilator fans and some 3rd story A/C in the heat of the day. The electronic controls to turn these circuits on and off are getting a lot cheaper now, but is still pricey. Much like the auto. transfer switches needed for generator auto. switching.  

     I would not yet trust any buy back agreement that requires I buy extra regulators etc., to connect to the grid here. Our power comes in at from 157volts to 212volts fluctuating by the minute. If they can not even control the voltage, why would I think anything as sophisticated as what the Australians seem to have working well, would work here?  

    Also, if the government gives, the government can take it away. The Sun Valley Idaho situation was one of these. If the solar power is actually usable and cost effective to the utility they will go with it. But if it comes in when they need it least, all but 2 or 3 months a year, they will drop it soon as the government bales out. Then of coarse here in the Philippines maybe your solar power will be in competition with some power plant owned by politically connected folks?

    Not being on the grid at all is a dream of mine. And maybe someday as battery technology improves, and air conditioning systems become more efficient, it will become feasible, but we are not there yet. We run our aircon 24/7, 12 months a year, except for brown outs, and the thermostat only cycles off a few minutes an hour in the predawn hours.  

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ed villas

 

 

The power in our area (Canduman, Mandaue City) is really dirty (that is, sags, spikes, unbalanced lines, etc.) I know very little about solar power to grid interfaces, but I am concerned that a dirty grid

 

could you explain what is a DIRTY GRID?

DIRTY?

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       I think by "dirty grid" he means full of spikes and lows. About 2 years ago my house was spiked with so much power that the 125 volt battery back up PCA that I had in the circuit behind a 50% reduction transformer, the transformer, and the power board on my Sony big screen  that was plugged into it were all blown away. The TV wasn't even on!

      Recently I went up the road to our electric utilities office on a Saturday morning. Power was at 138 volts! They were closed, but an engineer was there. I lied a little to him, telling him that not only did I have an accurate meter telling me the current voltage, but it was connected to my computer and it graphed the voltage and uploaded the readings (lie). I ask him to fix it, as we were way below the 210 volts the meter assumes, and even a scroll compressor frig can't handle that low of voltage very long.

     A crew was at my house in 5 minutes. They wiggied the power and got 152 volts, then proceeded to move our house's load to a different transformers feeder circuit. We then were at 244 volts, it stayed around there for weeks, but is now down around 215. But it can bump anytime, and still does for a second or two, up or down as much as 50 volts. If you monitored the cycleage I bet it would be bouncing too. That is my definition of a "a dirty grid".

Edited by big RB
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Had the same issue with Cebeco down south they have their 220v centre tapped supply and at the Meter it was running 198volts early morning and when demand got to high like pretty much all day it dropped to 165Volt .. Now Cebecco have a 10% allowance on their Supply lines which is crazy and they seem to think 198 Volts is acceptable but when i took a Video of My Fluke and its readings over a day and they knew  that I'm an Elctrical Engineer they agreed that they system was in adequate and now they have to Upgrade or change the location of their Transformer to meet the Requirements set out from the Supply Authorities Act. Or dodgy up something to make it right 

 

I suggest Big RB if you have proof about your TV you should put a claim against them. Cant Hurt 

 

 

Would be interested to Know what Vecco's Buy back tarrif is from the Solar power per Kilowatt Hour 

 

Personally if they offered a good tariff for excess power to the grid I would offer a 4-6 kw system here plus install ... Might cost a bit more but if the tarrif is right then it would be worth while .. In Australia when they first bought this out they offered 44cent per KWh ,, Amazing returns until they relised  this and then scaled it right back ..

 

Edited by shanelec
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And if its your own house you can have surge Surpressors installed for Spikes and or   FCL ( Fault Current Limiters ) these protect you from any anomaly's in the Grid .. Especially here where it fluctuates quite a lot 

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Jim in Cebu

could you explain what is a DIRTY GRID?

DIRTY?

 

 

       I think by "dirty grid" he means full of spikes and lows. About 2 years ago my house was spiked with so much power that the 125 volt battery back up PCA that I had in the circuit behind a 50% reduction transformer, the transformer, and the power board on my Sony big screen  that was plugged into it were all blown away. The TV wasn't even on!

      Recently I went up the road to our electric utilities office on a Saturday morning. Power was at 138 volts! They were closed, but an engineer was there. I lied a little to him, telling him that not only did I have an accurate meter telling me the current voltage, but it was connected to my computer and it graphed the voltage and uploaded the readings (lie). I ask him to fix it, as we were way below the 210 volts the meter assumes, and even a scroll compressor frig can't handle that low of voltage very long.

     A crew was at my house in 5 minutes. They wiggied the power and got 152 volts, then proceeded to move our house's load to a different transformers feeder circuit. We then were at 244 volts, it stayed around there for weeks, but is now down around 215. But it can bump anytime, and still does for a second or two, up or down as much as 50 volts. If you monitored the cycleage I bet it would be bouncing too. That is my definition of a "a dirty grid".

 

big RB's has provided a good description of some of the problems with the electrical grid in Cebu and in many places in the Philippines.

 

Unless you add protection (typically in the form of Automatic Voltage Regulators (AVR) and/or Uninterruptable Power Supplies (UPS), your electronic components are subject to either a sudden, catastrophic failure (like RB's Sony TV and equipment) or premature/short-lifespan failure (such as in capacitors in fans, air conditioners, etc.).  IMO (and in the opinion of the appliance repairmen we have talked to), an AVR should be placed in front of anything that you don't want to lose in a short period of time.  (Purchasing hint for Cebu City area:  Buy AVRs at SM Department Store or Ace Hardware's 20% off sales which happen several times a year as higher wattage AVRs are not cheap.)

--

 

Here's a question for big RB or other electrical engineers:  VECO supplies two "hot" legs.  When I measured them to ground (a metal water pipe), I got very different voltages -- something like 140v and 60v (for a total of 200v, leg-to-leg).  I was surprised by this.  I would assume that the hot legs should be balanced at 110v each. // Question:  What effect does the imbalanced legs have on electronic equipment (-- TVs, computers, digital controllers --) and appliances (with compressors or motors (-- refrigerators, aircon, washing machines)?

--

 

Also, at the last construction fair, I talked with a LED lighting vendor.  She said that LEDs are very sensitive to voltage changes and that LED lamps should have regulated power supplies on the local grid.

--

Edited by Jim in Cebu
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Woolf

 

 

Here's a question for big RB or other electrical engineers: VECO supplies two "hot" legs. When I measured them to ground (a metal water pipe), I got very different voltages -- something like 140v and 60v (for a total of 200v, leg-to-leg).

 

Did you use a digital voltage meter ?

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My take on this and just a theory is that there is no maintenance to any of the Transformers here in Cebu .. This can cause a lot of issue with your "Dirty" Power as you put it . 

 

Jim is correct if you want to protect something you don't want damaged or can't afford to replace put a ups in . they have built in protection from spikes 

Lower Voltages are dangerous regarding elements like water heaters etc as when you lower the Voltage the Amps increase .. General Ohms Law there ,, as these are not spikes its hard to protect against them unless you have FCL . 

110v 110v supplies is new to me here but if you are getting different voltages to a water Pipe it seems to me that the earthing is not right . Normally the FE Functional earth is a copper electrode driven into the ground and is separate to other earths.. they are merely Equipotentional bonding connected to the FE . But here most of the time it goes back to the Pole and is earth through the transformer . So any residual Current/Voltage  running back will go through multiple routes .. that might be why you get different voltage s.. ( Just a theory ) 

Edited by shanelec
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Woolf

 

 

Lower Voltages are dangerous regarding elements like water heaters etc as when you lower the Voltage the Amps increase .. General Ohms Law there ,, as these are not spikes its hard to protect against them unless you have FCL .

 

Water heater elements have a fixed resistance

if voltage go down so do amps

 

so I dont see how there could be any danger to the heating element

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stevensanph

The tariff from veco is almost certainly the 'generation charge' as that is what the renewable energy act dictates.

 

 

 

Sent from my O+ 8.92 Android using Tapatalk

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