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This looks interesting... any thoughts?


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According to the creators, the device is designed to provide enough electricity to power an apartment or small home. “The Liam F1 generates an average of 1,500 kilowatt-hours of energy [per year] at a wind-speed of 5 m/s [16.4 ft/s], which resembles half of the power consumption of a common household.” The Liam can even adjust to wind direction, which enables it to maximize power generation even with changing conditions.

 

that small house would have to have 3 light bulbs................... that's about it!!

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  • 4 weeks later...
Paul

As I previously posted in another wind energy related thread - looks like another fly-by-night company coming up, to me.

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MattFromGA

According to the creators, the device is designed to provide enough electricity to power an apartment or small home. “The Liam F1 generates an average of 1,500 kilowatt-hours of energy [per year] at a wind-speed of 5 m/s [16.4 ft/s], which resembles half of the power consumption of a common household.” The Liam can even adjust to wind direction, which enables it to maximize power generation even with changing conditions.

 

that small house would have to have 3 light bulbs................... that's about it!!

 

Perhaps you are reading it as 1500 watts total for the year.  It is 1500 kilowatt hours.  That means 1500 hours of 1000 watts of power per year.  That is about 4 1000 watt hours per day.  That would run a tad more than 3 light bulbs.

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Paul

Perhaps you are reading it as 1500 watts total for the year.  It is 1500 kilowatt hours.  That means 1500 hours of 1000 watts of power per year.  That is about 4 1000 watt hours per day.  That would run a tad more than 3 light bulbs.

 

Good catch, Matt. 1,500 kWh per year averages out to 125 kWh per month, a bit more than what I currently use each and every month, here. 

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MattFromGA

I might be missing the boat on this, but I am paying about 13 cents total for 1 kwh.  That means I pay about $195 for 1500 kwh.  The unit costs $5500, and I suspect more to actually get it hooked up and providing electricity.  It would appear that I would have to use the unit for over 28 years before it paid for itself.

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Paul

I might be missing the boat on this, but I am paying about 13 cents total for 1 kwh.  That means I pay about $195 for 1500 kwh.  The unit costs $5500, and I suspect more to actually get it hooked up and providing electricity.  It would appear that I would have to use the unit for over 28 years before it paid for itself.

 

I pay .375c US / kWh, here.  That would be $562.50, per 1,500 kWh, and about a 10 year pay off for me, IF it works and IF it were to actually generate 125 kWh per month, every month, for those 10 years. 

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