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Knowdafish

DIY Koi Pond Filter

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hyaku

Septic tank for fish?If budget is a problem and they have a reasonable pump I would try and get hold of 4-5 of the drums they supply margarine in to the bakers - normal cost about P150/each - arrange in a line and join with PVC Tube - get some plastic mesh and foam of increasing densities and hook it all up - will take a few weeks for the bacteria to become active... use sand in the last drum?

I paid P40 for one drum and packed it with mattress foam. Simple but effective. My main pool is raised up one meter deep to be able to sit and enjoy at eye level. Just need to filter a few hours a day and wash the foam. For me its mostly important to filter the water going in.

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Knowdafish

Septic tank for fish?

 

If budget is a problem and they have a reasonable pump I would try and get hold of 4-5 of the drums they supply margarine in to the bakers - normal cost about P150/each - arrange in a line and join with PVC Tube - get some plastic mesh and foam of increasing densities and hook it all up - will take a few weeks for the bacteria to become active... use sand in the last drum?

 

Thank you for your reply, but at 150p each are they 55 gallon drums or are they 5 gallon buckets? I can easily procure cheap buckets here (which are way too small), but we are looking for a source of inexpensive 55 gallon drums. Fancy you mentioned bakers though, as a I got a PM yesterday mentioning the phone numbers for a commercial bakery supply business here in Dumaguete. We'll see what they have to offer. 

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JohnSurrey

Thank you for your reply, but at 150p each are they 55 gallon drums or are they 5 gallon buckets? I can easily procure cheap buckets here (which are way too small), but we are looking for a source of inexpensive 55 gallon drums. Fancy you mentioned bakers though, as a I got a PM yesterday mentioning the phone numbers for a commercial bakery supply business here in Dumaguete. We'll see what they have to offer.

I was told the bakery sold them for P150... although that could have been P150 for the three...

 

It reads Vegetable Shortening and Snowlar or Snowjar and 35kgs... so about 7 1/2 gallons...

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Knowdafish

 

 

so about 7 1/2 gallons...

 

Those would work for a much smaller system than the one I am working on. Thank you for your reply. 

 

Yan-Yan here in Dumaguete has a vast assortment of different size barrels and buckets, but sadly are "out of stock" of the 55 gallon large plastic barrels we are looking for. They took my cell # and said "we will call you when we get some more in stock".

Time will tell. The gal there said they go for 1300p each. I was hoping that some could be found for 500p? Maybe I am dreaming..... 

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Knowdafish

While still looking for an inexpensive source of 55 gallon plastic drums, I dropped by the church where the pond and fountain is located to see if they were making any progress.  My contact, who is almost always there, was no place to be found. I think he bailed early to miss the onset of rain as the sky was beginning to darken and spit a drop here and there.

 

I looked around and it doesn't look like they have made any progress as no drums could be found on their property, but I did notice that the pond in question was notably clearer, which is a good sign. I know they did a large water change last week, but on this visit I also noticed that the surface was almost completely covered by water lettuce and a few water hyacinths. These plants act like a filter and are an excellent low buck way to aerate a pond and remove nitrates. Too bad you can't see the fish now though! 

 

With the rainy season slowly coming upon us here in Dumaguete at least the fish should be in the money with fresh water from the weekly rain. This is a major victory for the very nice koi that are in this pond, but it doesn't help with viewing them or the operation of the fountain which located above this pond. Hopefully this will change soon.

 

To be continued.......

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fred42

While still looking for an inexpensive source of 55 gallon plastic drums, I dropped by the church where the pond and fountain is located to see if they were making any progress.  My contact, who is almost always there, was no place to be found. I think he bailed early to miss the onset of rain as the sky was beginning to darken and spit a drop here and there.

 

I looked around and it doesn't look like they have made any progress as no drums could be found on their property, but I did notice that the pond in question was notably clearer, which is a good sign. I know they did a large water change last week, but on this visit I also noticed that the surface was almost completely covered by water lettuce and a few water hyacinths. These plants act like a filter and are an excellent low buck way to aerate a pond and remove nitrates. Too bad you can't see the fish now though! 

 

With the rainy season slowly coming upon us here in Dumaguete at least the fish should be in the money with fresh water from the weekly rain. This is a major victory for the very nice koi that are in this pond, but it doesn't help with viewing them or the operation of the fountain which located above this pond. Hopefully this will change soon.

 

To be continued.......

 

I put all my water lettuce in a separate pond as the Koi eat the roots and generally make a mess..and as you say..The fish are no longer visible!

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Knowdafish

I put all my water lettuce in a separate pond as the Koi eat the roots and generally make a mess..and as you say..The fish are no longer visible!

 

Tilapia and quite a few other omnivorous and vegetarian fish will do the same thing. Fortunately this particular pond is way understocked with just a few mid-sized koi so they don't shred the plants too badly. 

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hyaku

One of the other problems experienced in such bright sunlight is algae. If the dirt doesn't get you the sun will. My pools are well shaded.

 

Plant can be contained in floating rings.

 

Easy to see the fish if you feed them in the same place at the same time. Just about to sit outside and feed mine now.

 

What kind of food are you guys using?

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Knowdafish

 

 

What kind of food are you guys using?

 

To be very vague - "pellets". Good koi food is somewhat expensive and hard to come by here, that is why eventually I will make my own. I already have a great recipe. I just need a commercial mixer and a meat grinder with the right size die. 

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hyaku

I think mines Tetra. Going home to Japan soon. I could find a supplier but I guess it could work out very expensive. I don't like to buy too much at one time. It doesn't keep very well here.

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Knowdafish

 

 

One of the other problems experienced in such bright sunlight is algae. If the dirt doesn't get you the sun will. My pools are well shaded.

 

Shade, adequate filtration, and the removal of nitrates are some of the ways to control algae, but there is another - U.V. light. 

 

If the proper sized U.V. light is installed in the pumps return line it will kill all water born algae and make the pond incredibly clear. It will completely eliminate water born algae altogether. No more green water and as a bonus it also kills all waterborne pathogens too.

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fred42

One of the other problems experienced in such bright sunlight is algae. If the dirt doesn't get you the sun will. My pools are well shaded.

 

Plant can be contained in floating rings.

 

Easy to see the fish if you feed them in the same place at the same time. Just about to sit outside and feed mine now.

 

What kind of food are you guys using?

 

When our pond was first built it was in direct sunlight..After about a month the water turned too pea soup..So bad we couldn't see anything,let alone fish..

We built a nipa roof over it and within two weeks the water cleared.. 

About 6 months later we started getting an algae like this..Filamentous_Algae.jpg

 

The water is still crystal and this stuff lays on the bottom..

I did try to clean it out at first but now I just leave it in there as I have a feeling that it probably feeds off of nitrates.

I did think about a UV but my electric bill is high enough because of the pump running 24/7!

 

We feed our Koi on Tilipia pellets that we get from the agri vets for 35 Peso per kilo..

Fish are growing good.

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Knowdafish

 

 

I have a feeling that it probably feeds off of nitrates.

 

You are correct. All algae needs nitrate, phosphate, and light. Nitrates and phosphates originate from fish food and can be reduced by other plants competing with the algae for food. Water lettuce is a good one as is water hyacinth though there are others. Both float at the surface. The main difference between the two is the amount of light they like with water lettuce liking moderate light and water hyacinth liking intense light. 

 

Another way to reduce nitrates and phosphates in the water is by doing regular partial water changes of at least 25%. Ideally this should be done weekly but it depends on how heavily the pond is stocked. The goal is to keep nitrates under 20ppm or even less. This can be measured with an aquarium or pond water test kit. The lower the nitrate level the less the occurrence of algae will be even in direct sunlight.

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fred42

Knowdafish..

 

We do regular water changes as we have a huge garden here that needs to be watered everyday so its win win.. I have also got 2 large pots in the pond that I have planted gabby leaves in and other bog plants that I found in a swamp in our local city.. 

First time Ive ever had a pond so I`m still on the learning curve when it comes to Koi.. 

There used to be a Japanese Koi dealer in Manila that had an excellent web site where you could view hundreds of fish in different shallow buckets on youtube..You could select the fish you wanted and he`d ship them (air freight) the next day.. They dont seem to be operating anymore due to the flooding in Manila a year or so ago.. Have you heard of JD Koi center?? Here`s one of there many Y/T video`s..

 

I used to be into Marine aquariums big time some years ago but it got too expensive for me in the UK.. I`m designing a tank now that I have never seen produced..ever!!

It is based on my fish ponds bottom drain system and your fish waste collection swirl filter.. Cant wait as the tank will be 40 meters from the reef`s in Panglao.. 

Cheers,

Fred.

 

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Knowdafish
We feed our Koi on Tilipia pellets that we get from the agri vets for 35 Peso per kilo..

 

Be aware that most of the fish foods sold here are extremely low in quality. Protein is expensive and fish food in that price range is generally low on usable protein. If the food does not come with a list of ingredients and it's nutritional breakdown it is highly suspect. Koi will easily live for 20 years if well taken care of but that includes being fed a good quality diet. I suggest supplementing their diet with fruits and veggies. They are particularly fond of watermelon along with oranges and other citrus fruit, but will also readily eat almost any other plant matter that is to their liking including mulunggay leaves which is highly nutritious. Older koi usually die from internal diseases including cancer brought on by poor nutrition and/or poor water quality unless the more common fish diseases don't kill them 1st. 

 

It is important to keep their immunity up with the vitamins they need. These are almost always lacking in poor quality foods thus the need for supplemental fruits and veggies in their diet.

 

Tilapia don't generally live long enough before they are eaten to develop any major problems plus they are a hardier fish than ornamental koi. Tilapia are also good at gleaning food from their environment and have gill rakers that help sift the water for phytoplankton that is why they do so well in an aquaculture environment with relatiely low "input". Koi do not posses the same advantages.

Edited by Knowdafish

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