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pabridez

I've been learning the international language of Esperanto since January.  I have to tell you that I'm excited that I've learned so much so quickly.  Unfortunately, my experience here in Cebu has been such that I can't find anyone to practice with.  It's as if I'm learning to speak Swahili or French or something - there are few Esperanto speakers here.  

 

Fortunately, the net has lots of places for a new speaker to go and meet other Esperantists.  I just wish there were a few more in the local area.  I understand that Manila has many Esperanto speakers, and that's an option.  I can see taking a vacation to Manila for an Esperanto weekend.  It would probably be fun.

 

Well,  if there are folks out there who are curious about Esperanto in Cebu,  just leave me a message or go to this site:   http://studyesperanto.weebly.com/   It's still under construction, but there is a lot of information to see.  

 

Gxis la revido  (until next time)

joe

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how do you say "give it a rest" in esperanto?

why...just the other day i was thinking the same thing!

there are also those that believe UFOs hover over elvis' grave. seriously tho, you seem quite passionate with your interest so enjoy whether anyone else here agrees with it or not. i have many friends

skippy

Unfortunately,esperanto has been left behind by history,with the onset of the internet and worldwide mass communication,english has consolidated its position as the premier language in use today.However,learning another language has many advantages,but would be even better if it were relevant,you might consider tagalog or visayan,or as international events unfold,mandarin ?

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broden

eventually everyone will get their babelfish and  learning languages will be left behind

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pabridez

Her

Unfortunately,esperanto has been left behind by history,with the onset of the internet and worldwide mass communication,english has consolidated its position as the premier language in use today.However,learning another language has many advantages,but would be even better if it were relevant,you might consider tagalog or visayan,or as international events unfold,mandarin ?

  

 

Esperanto has not been left behind.  For an auxiliary language, Esperanto is doing quite well.  

 

Here are some interesting facts:  Esperanto is currently spoken by up to 10 million people world-wide (in some estimates), 2 million professionally proficient.  That equals the number of Czech and JSL or GSL speakers (Japanese or German as a second language), and more people then speak Swedish, Belarusian, and 15 other major national languages or language families.  Esperanto went to space.  Esperanto is popular in China; China has state sponsored radio programs in Esperanto.  The British government employs Esperanto translators,  Esperanto stamps have been issued by postal authorities, Native Esperanto speakers, (people who have used the language from birth), include World Chess Champion Susan Polger, Ulrich Brandenberg the new German Ambassador to and Nobel Laureate Daniel Bovet. Financier George Soros learnt Esperanto as a child, Esperanto is currently the language of instruction of the International Academy of Sciences in San MarinoEsperanto has the 32nd-largest Wikipedia as measured by the number of articles,[11] and the largest Wikipedia in a constructed language, The Senate of Brazil passed a bill in 2009 that would make Esperanto an optional part of the curriculum in public schools, and much much more.  

 

 see the wiki page  here

 

There are several Esperanto associations in the PI as well....look into it.

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Here are some interesting facts: Esperanto is currently spoken by up to 10 million people world-wide (in some estimates), 2 million professionally proficient.

 

From your link: Estimates of Esperanto speakers range from 100,000 to 2,000,000 active or fluent speakers worldwide, including perhaps a thousand native speakers who learned Esperanto from birth as one of their native languages.

Finnish linguist Jouko Lindstedt, an expert on native-born Esperanto speakers, presented the following scheme[1] to show the overall proportions of language capabilities within the Esperanto community:

    1,000 have Esperanto as their native language.
    10,000 speak it fluently.
    100,000 can use it actively.
    1,000,000 understand a large amount passively.
    10,000,000 have studied it to some extent at some time (I am one of them, a total waste of time and I have never used the language)

 

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contraman

 

 

Esperanto has the 32nd-largest Wikipedia as measured by the number of articles,

 

Unfortunately Wikipedia is not always a good point of reference as it can be hijacked by a group with similar and extreme views on that subject.

From reading this article it looks like this is a classic example of that.

 

Sure, It was touted to be the so called universal language of the world. But as mentioned in a previous thread it is just a has been.

I travel extensively, and you would be the first person in many decades that I have heard mentioned it.

 

But everyone has a hobby, and if that's yours, well and good and best of luck.

 

Cheers

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Unfortunately Wikipedia is not always a good point of reference as it can be hijacked by a group with similar and extreme views on that subject.

From reading this article it looks like this is a classic example of that.

 

Sure, It was touted to be the so called universal language of the world. But as mentioned in a previous thread it is just a has been.

I travel extensively, and you would be the first person in many decades that I have heard mentioned it.

 

But everyone has a hobby, and if that's yours, well and good and best of luck.

 

Cheers

Or or if you are using this as evidence Norwegian is much better than Esperanto, its the 14th largest :-)

There are also more people who both speak and understand Norwegian than Esperanto.

 

Norwegian is therefore possibly the language people should learn, not Esperanto.

 

:dance2:

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SkyMan

eventually everyone will get their babelfish and  learning languages will be left behind

If a baby were given a babbelfish, would it ever actually learn a language?

 

As for Esperanto, I always thought it was a joke and not a real language. Nonetheless, why would you come to Cebu expecting to find Esperanto speakers? A third world country which struggles with English and it's own languages?

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pabridez

If a baby were given a babbelfish, would it ever actually learn a language?

 

As for Esperanto, I always thought it was a joke and not a real language. Nonetheless, why would you come to Cebu expecting to find Esperanto speakers? A third world country which struggles with English and it's own languages?

 

LOL...  I never heard of Esperanto until I saw a Filipino facebook page for esperantists.  You Obviously like to give Filipinos less credit than what you think you deserve...     

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pabridez

Or or if you are using this as evidence Norwegian is much better than Esperanto, its the 14th largest :-)

There are also more people who both speak and understand Norwegian than Esperanto.

 

Norwegian is therefore possibly the language people should learn, not Esperanto.

 

:dance2:

 

 

You could be right, but you're not.  As it is, English as an auxiliary or second language is not the best choice for the world because of its many dialects, regional idioms, difficult to spell words, and the myriad problems people have in speaking or writing it correctly - most of the comments on this website being good examples.  Only about 2% of esl speakers can hold a trivial conversation about common things, places, and ideas.  Norwegian, the language of my ancestors,  hasn't a prayer as a world auxiliary language.   English will recede as well, as the US and England fade into history.  Esperanto will continue to attract a greater audience in the future.  

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Majorsco

I used to know a guy that spoke Esperanto, and he considered himself pretty good at it.  He and I debated its usefulness and he, who was  a very well educated systems engineer, couldn't put it in terms of a real need or use.

 

I considered it a useless exercise because there is no people of the world who speak it.  There is no culture that claim Esperanto.  It is a language with no speakers, no culture, and no purpose.  

 

It's a nice intellectual excursion, but, in my opinion it has no real use or purpose.  Even the dead language Latin, has a place in the lexicon of languages, as a mother tongue of many modern languages.

 

Just my opinion.

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pabridez

Unfortunately Wikipedia is not always a good point of reference as it can be hijacked by a group with similar and extreme views on that subject.

From reading this article it looks like this is a classic example of that.

 

Sure, It was touted to be the so called universal language of the world. But as mentioned in a previous thread it is just a has been.

I travel extensively, and you would be the first person in many decades that I have heard mentioned it.

 

But everyone has a hobby, and if that's yours, well and good and best of luck.

 

Cheers

 

 

Esperanto was never TOUTED as being the universal language.  Esperanto is recognized by even the Philippines and the UN as an auxiliary language to help cross borders.  If you were to travel to Europe today, you would easily find Esperanto speakers in every major city.  My brother once told me that when he was stationed in Germany, he conversed with the locals in Spanish because he didnt speak German and they either didnt speak, or refused to speak English.  What do you think happened when he later toured the rest of  Europe?  The barriers were even taller.  

 

Language is more than a hobby for most people outside of the egocentric English speaking countries.  Just as decisively as Language can separate people and nations, a common language can dispel fear and suspicion.  You can try to learn some of the 6000 world languages or try to converse with a single national language, such as English or French.  But the best answer is that everyone who cares about peace in the world community make a small effort to learn an auxiliary language, Esperanto, which by far has surpassed any other auxiliary language created to fill the void.   

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easy44

You could be right, but you're not.  As it is, English as an auxiliary or second language is not the best choice for the world because of its many dialects, regional idioms, difficult to spell words, and the myriad problems people have in speaking or writing it correctly - most of the comments on this website being good examples.  Only about 2% of esl speakers can hold a trivial conversation about common things, places, and ideas.  Norwegian, the language of my ancestors,  hasn't a prayer as a world auxiliary language.   English will recede as well, as the US and England fade into history.  Esperanto will continue to attract a greater audience in the future.

 

English may not be the best choice for a second language, but it is THE choice at this point in time. There are ESL schools everywhere you go, so it's popularity is spreading not fading. The chances of the US and England fading into history in the foreseeable future are nil. At least Latin has some usage in scientific and academic fields. Esperanto might be a nice hobby, but what cultural, economic or national interest will make it acceptable and desirable to the world population? Nobody is going to take up a language that has no use in the modern world just because its easy to learn.

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lifeisgood

I used to know a guy that spoke Esperanto, and he considered himself pretty good at it.  He and I debated its usefulness and he, who was  a very well educated systems engineer, couldn't put it in terms of a real need or use.

 

I considered it a useless exercise because there is no people of the world who speak it.  There is no culture that claim Esperanto.  It is a language with no speakers, no culture, and no purpose.  

 

It's a nice intellectual excursion, but, in my opinion it has no real use or purpose.  Even the dead language Latin, has a place in the lexicon of languages, as a mother tongue of many modern languages.

 

Just my opinion.

 

I have seen some people recommend learning Esperanto because it is an easier language to learn.  It may not be widely used, but if learning languages is something you are interested in, then figuring out how to learn one is just as important as the language itself.  I am working on Spanish right now and part of that is trying to come up with a system that works for me that can also be used to learning other languages.  

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pabridez

English may not be the best choice for a second language, but it is THE choice at this point in time. There are ESL schools everywhere you go, so it's popularity is spreading not fading. The chances of the US and England fading into history in the foreseeable future are nil. At least Latin has some usage in scientific and academic fields. Esperanto might be a nice hobby, but what cultural, economic or national interest will make it acceptable and desirable to the world population? Nobody is going to take up a language that has no use in the modern world just because its easy to learn.

 

 

And in a few years, Mandarin will be the best choice, but at least the Chinese recognise Esperanto as more than useful.  

 

The US is 16 trillion (=220 trillion) in debt.  Already domestic assets like oil and coal are reserved for Chinese claim:  US companies cant touch them.  The US will not go away;  Greece, Egypt, England, Spain, France, Holland, Japan, Mongolia, Italy, the American indian nations, and Turkey, are all still here as well, just not as powerful as they once were.  

 

The word 'Esperanto' is derived from the latin.   

 

You are too late with your hypothesis.  Esperanto has been around for over 125 years.  There has been 10s of millions of learners.  There is an academy of science that uses it exclusively.  There are Esperanto families with children using it as a first language.  There are Esperantists from all walks of life and from every continent who regularly engage in meaningful discussions in the internet and in person.  I don't speak gaelic and have never heard it spoken, but that doesn't mean its not a legitimate language and popular in certain circles.

 

  Nobody will take up the language?  Who do you think you are writing to?  I find it both easy to learn and beneficial.  I have Esperanto friends.  do you have any Gaelic friends?  

 

Gxis la revido

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