Jump to content

Recommended Posts

sugbu777

FOUR OUT OF FIVE WHO CLAIM TO BE VIETNAM VETS ARE NOT.

Whenever folks ask me if I am a Vietnam vet, I truthfully tell them I am a VIETNAM ERA vet (which is a category asked for some jobs). I never served in-country. Although I volunteered to go there, the Navy sent me to Japan instead.

Edited by Paul
corrected quote error.
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 105
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • smokey

    13

  • lamoe

    9

  • mpt1947

    9

  • sugbu777

    8

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Vietnam War: Facts, Stats & Myths Credit: Capt. Marshal Hanson, USNR (Ret.) and Capt. Scott Beaton, Statistical Source 9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the official Vie

you won't be trolling the vets forum anymore

This discussion is getting a bit twisted ,   I posted the export as a great point of interest, in my opinion. All service personnel serve an active role in any conflict, simply by the nature of the

Posted Images

cebubird

I guess you now know what NOT to post on this site, doncha? 

 

Oh, I can't take credit for his dumb ass being banned. Another admin took that liberty.

 

 

But I had a PERFECTLY RIGHT ON post deleted about his comments(even tho my friend Lamoe disagreed wit me)lol

Link to post
Share on other sites
rainymike

In looking back at those years, it does seem that madness overtakes the world and my country at times. Every effort was being made to portray communism as a monolithic devil. Domino theory and all.

 

And yet, when I look at the world in the years that followed. China and the Soviets had a falling out. Communist China worked hard (and still is) to undo Mao's vision of a communist state. The Soviet Union collapsed and is former territories are often feuding with Russia. The communists in Vietnam were able to unify their country. But in a few short years was and still is kissing America's butt to become a member of the capitalistic global economy.

 

Maybe the wars that were fought did prevent communism from becoming a unifying way of life for the world. But I suspect that it never would have succeeded anyway. Regional and national politics just seem to defy any attempt to force one way of life on everyone. American soldiers pay a high price to do their duty. That I can respect, whether I agree with a war or not. What I cannot respect is how politicians don't do their duty well in exploring all options before sending young men off to fight and die. 

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator
Salty Dog

FOUR OUT OF FIVE WHO CLAIM TO BE VIETNAM VETS ARE NOT.

 

Whenever folks ask me if I am a Vietnam vet, I truthfully tell them I am a VIETNAM ERA vet (which is a category asked for some jobs). I never served in-country. Although I volunteered to go there, the Navy sent me to Japan instead.

 

Same point I was trying to make. By the way, that quote above was not from me it was from the OP:

 

My post said this: 

 

As of the current Census taken during August, 2000, the surviving U.S. Vietnam Veteran population estimate is: 1,002,511. This is hard to believe, losing nearly 711,000 between '95 and '00. That's 390 per day. During this Census count, the number of Americans falsely claiming to have served in-country is: 13,853,027. By this census, FOUR OUT OF FIVE WHO CLAIM TO BE VIETNAM VETS ARE NOT.

 

The issue about so many people claiming to be Vietnam vets when they weren't could be misleading. It may be the way the question was asked during the Census. 

 

I have a National Defence Medal for the Vietnam War and am considered a Veteran of the Vietnam War, but I never served in Vietnam. It is sometimes described as Vietnam era Veteran which means you didn't serve in Vietnam. It's that way in all wars. There are always a large number of armed forces personnel who don't serve in/on the battle field. I am also a Veteran of Desert Storm and The Iraq War, but I never served in Kuwait or Iraq. I just happen to be on active duty and participated in some aspect of the war. In my case it was providing port security for the transportation by the Military Sealift Command of the Army 3rd Infantry Division out of Fort Stewart, GA.

 

While it's not usually a big deal, in this case I do not agree with the statement that you quoted me as making. I just don't want anyone reading this thread to think that I said that.

Edited by Paul
Fixed issue
Link to post
Share on other sites
sugbu777

While it's not usually a big deal, in this case I do not agree with the statement that you quoted me as making. I just don't want anyone reading this thread to think that I said that.

Point taken. Sorry, It was not my intent to do that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Jason S

 

 

Fact: 2/3 of the men who served in Vietnam were volunteers. Approximately 70% of those killed in Vietnam were volunteers

 

     I wonder why the death ratio between volunteers and draftees is so vast? Could it be because that most draftees got their ass put in the infantry. I have a father and 4 Uncles (Fathers, Brothers) who served in Vietnam, 2 got drafted and  2 volunteered. The two that volunteered told me the only reason they did not wait to get drafted was because they wanted some type of control over what job and what Branch of the Military they ended up in. 

   

     However, I do not think it matters to most people where in Vietnam someone was stationed to be considered a Vietnam Veteran, if you were there, you were there. Not everyone serves in the military or serves their country in the same capacity. One of my Uncles was a Administration Clerk on a Navy ship and spent his entire tour off the coast of Vietnam and he has never tried to perpetuate anything other then that. In my perspective he is a Vietnam Veteran but some will disagree and that is their right.

 

     Actually, I did not realize that "Perpetrating a fraud as a Vietnam Veteran" was that big of an issue until I read this thread, lol.

Link to post
Share on other sites
sugbu777

In my perspective he is a Vietnam Veteran

If on a Navy ship in the designated combat zone, no matter what job he performed he is a Vietnam Veteran. The Navy is pretty strict on this and a sailor will know if their ship was considered "in-country" combat waters or not.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
roaddog

There was the viet nam campaign ribbon which everyone got in boot camp. Then the viet nam combat ribbon which you received if in country or off shore depending on if you were army, navy or marines.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill H

 

 

Myth: The United States lost the war in Vietnam . Fact: The American military was not defeated in Vietnam . The American military did not lose a battle of any consequence. From a military standpoint, it was almost an unprecedented performance. General Westmoreland quoting Douglas Pike (a professor at the University of California , Berkeley ), a major military defeat for the VC and NVA.

 

This quote says it all to me.  As a people, we need to be far more aware of the misinformation fed us by the uber left leaning media.  Then it seems the logical question is, just whose side are these idiots on?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Banacon

You're exactly 7 months older than me. Happy belated birthday.

 

I went to college out of high school. Got bored and went into the Coast Guard in Jan after the first semester. My draft notice from the Army came in while I was in boot camp. Oh how much different my life would have been if I hadn't been bored with college.

Same here, went to one year of college, that fall my neighbor was drafted. I knew my number was coming up, I joined the Marines. In boot camp I got the draft notice in mail at home.

I remember flying to Thailand on R&R and the pilot telling us to look down, they were bombing Cambodia. Was in nam for 19 months. 68-70. First sgt told me, no, you cannot take that mix French/Vietnamese girl home, request it again you will be here next week..khe sahn..

 

Sent from my KFTT using Tapatalk HD

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

I believe a lot of the landmines were put here to stop the Viet Cong from having an escape route? Someone else may be able to explain better than I can. I don't know why so many bombs were dropped here. You can google something like, "Cambodia, most bombed country in the world". That  will probably give you some decent results?

 

There is a huge difference between air-dropped mines and hand-set mines. Air-dropped mines (which are dispersed using multiple munition bombs) sit on top of the ground or get stuck in branches. Hand set mines are lightly covered with dirt, and become part of the landscape. 99.9% of the mines in Cambodia were set by Khmer and NVA forces. How do I know this? It is because almost all of the mines were hand-set, and because almost all are of Chinese, Russian and Eastern European manufacture. The US has never bought mines from these sources. Air-drop mines also have a much shorter field life. Once exposed to the elements, they corrode and become inoperable or self-destruct within a couple of years after they are dropped. Hand-set mines can remain dangerous for decades. Why? It is because air-drop mined are not sheathed, so the working parts are exposed to the elements, whereas hand-set mines are sheathed (usually in plastic) so the working parts are never exposed. To the best of my knowledge, the only American hand-set mines anywhere in Cambodia and Laos were in the immediate area surrounding a secret CIA airbase in southern Laos.

 

Did the US air-drop mines into Cambodia? You're damn straight we did, but the vast majority of weapons we dropped were high explosive or napalm bombs. The NVA had a huge logistics complex that ran all the way through Laos and Cambodia called the Ho Chi Minh Trail. I will dispel some myths about the trail. Most people believe the trail was a single road. In fact, in places it was up to a hundred separate roads and footpaths running cross-country through Laos and Cambodia, and was sometimes up to 60 or 70 miles wide. We attacked them wherever we found them. Most people think the trail ran from north to south. The trail ran BOTH directions, with men and materials being transported from North Vietnam south through Laos and Cambodia into South Vietnam, and men and materials being shipped to the south coast of Cambodia and then transported north through Cambodia into South Vietnam.

 

The NVA also had a huge headquarters and training area in eastern Cambodia called COSVN (Commander of Operations South Vietnam). Of course, that was our name for it...not theirs. If you look at the bombing map that Mikala provided, you will see that the most concentrated bombing was in the sectors where COSVN was (it moved around, so the areas bombed moved with them) and where the roads and trails ran that supplied COSVN (and the fight in South Vietnam). So...if you look at the map, you can see that the US was NOT bombing indiscriminately in Cambodia. We were bombing concentrations of NVA and NVA supply routes. If the map also showed the bombing in Laos, you would see the known extents of the Ho Chi Minh Trail as well as NVA headquarters and training areas.

 

Every kilo of supplies that we stopped along the trail meant that those supplies were not reaching NVA and VC forces in South Vietnam. Without our efforts to stop the NVA logistics systems and headquarters in Laos and Cambodia, it would have been a much uglier (and deadlier) war in South Vietnam. Everybody who served in South Vietnam should be thankful that we did intervene there. I lost 18 friends in Cambodia and Laos (on the ground) who were locating NVA trails and concentrations, so the US could attack them from the air.

 

If the NVA hadn't been operating in Laos and in Cambodia, then we wouldn't have attacked them there. There would have been no ordinance dropped in those countries. THAT is FACT. You have to fight your enemies wherever you find them. If borders don't count to your enemies, then it would be silly for our forces to observe them. My view of war is this: Rules of engagement get the wrong people killed. Either fight the enemy with every resource available or don't send our forces into harm's way.

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
mpt1947

There was the viet nam campaign ribbon which everyone got in boot camp. Then the viet nam combat ribbon which you received if in country or off shore depending on if you were army, navy or marines.

No - what we got in Boot Camp was the National Defense Ribbon - the saying goes that the National Defense is Blue for the Water that wasn't Crossed, Red for the Blood that wasn't shed and Yellow for the Stripe Down one's Back...

Here is the link on the National Defense http://www.afpc.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=7803

 

In Vietnam there were two ribbons - The Vietnamese Campaign Ribbon - Green and White

http://www.afpc.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=7843

 

The Vietnamese Service Ribbon - you got stars for every Campaign you took part in refer to this link 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_Service_Medal

 

Depending on your own circumstances, you might have a Purple Heart, Silver and/or Bronze Stars - If you have a Medal of Honor - let me stand up and Salute you.

 

Semper Fi

Edited by mpt1947
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Mikala

 

 

Air-dropped mines (which are dispersed using multiple munition bombs) sit on top of the ground or get stuck in branches

 

Call me a squid all day. Never heard of air-dropped mines before now. Thanks for all the information though Headshot, along with the explanation on how they decay. I'll stop feeling responsible for the Cambodians I see with missing limbs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
sugbu777

Either fight the enemy with every resource available or don't send our forces into harm's way.

Bingo! The U.S. military was not "allowed" to win the war in Vietnam. It was too controlled by the politicos. If you're going to be in a war, you need to fight to win.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
sugbu777

what we got in Boot Camp was the National Defense Ribbon

 

That is correct. I have the ND ribbon/medal with star (Vietnam Era and Persian Gulf). Yeah, I was in that long.

 

Semper Fi

As someone who grew up in El Toro, CA let me salute you. My dad was an FMF corpsman. I remember riding in the car with my mom on base in El Toro to go to the commissary and we would get behind a troop truck carrying Marines to the aircraft to fly them to 'Nam. She would cry...a lot. She said to us kids "Look at those poor young boys, going over there and they can't even have a beer or vote for who is sending them to fight." This was probably around 1968 when she said that. The 18 year old vote was not in effect at that time. Edited by sugbu777
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

Capture.JPG

I Understand...