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miles-high

Tuition warning! ;)

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miles-high

Found this in my mailbox…

 

Scan2.jpg

 

It seems the elementary/high school tuition is probably too expensive for the average Filipinos… This school seems to be twice as expensive as Ateneo elementary/high school. The tuition for the Ateneo Law School is about the same as this school…

 

People say things are cheaper in the Philippines but that is only true if you are retiring in the Philippines… But if you had school age kids and if you want to give them good education, the cost would become in some cases prohibitive…

 

To be a successful lawyer (one of those who are making a few million pesos or more a year), you would probably need to start from the Ateneo preschool toddler (or similar) program starting from age 2 all the way to Ateneo Law School (it is a 4-year program in the Philippines), you would have to pay average of PHP350,000 a year for, well, 23 years! That is about PHP8,050,000! (Plus you probably need to pay for a nanny and a driver… for 23 years.)

 

Any way, it seems good education is expensive in the Philippines… If I had kids, I am not sure if I would stay here… :D

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Headshot

It seems the elementary/high school tuition is probably too expensive for the average Filipinos… This school seems to be twice as expensive as Ateneo elementary/high school. The tuition for the Ateneo Law School is about the same as this school…

 

Average Filipinos don't send their children to international schools. Even average foreigners in the Philippines don't send their children to international schools either. What is really interesting is that this school only goes up to 8th grade. What in the world are you going to do with that?

 

Any way, it seems good education is expensive in the Philippines… If I had kids, I am not sure if I would stay here… :D

 

I finally came to the same conclusion...but not just for the monetary reasons. However, even though we have made the decision to move to the US, we will stay here for nursery school and kindergarten for our daughter. I figured that between us and the school, she will still be way ahead of the pack when she enters the first grade in the US. At the very least, going to school here will ensure that she is well-socialized before first grade. She has already shown herself to be extremely smart academically (even before she starts nursery school).

Edited by Headshot
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lopburi3

Education is expensive period.  It is only because of tax support that the cost is reasonable (or free).  In other countries when you want international standards schooling the cost can be astronomical.  This internationl school education is normally paid by expat employers and governments (or very rich locals) so high price is not a problem for the school and they need to be high priced to attract international teaching staff with credentials (and I do understand some unqualified credential teachers are better - even much better - than some apparently highly qualified).

 

Primary schools are common as a starting point for international schools here in Thailand as as they grow older (graduate students to fill more years, they expand to more years.  But it is not unusual in most countries to attend a different school for higher years (we call it High School in the USA).

Edited by lopburi3
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Sven

To be a successful lawyer (one of those who are making a few million pesos or more a year), you would probably need to start from the Ateneo preschool toddler (or similar) program starting from age 2 all the way to Ateneo Law School (it is a 4-year program in the Philippines), you would have to pay average of PHP350,000 a year for, well, 23 years! That is about PHP8,050,000! (Plus you probably need to pay for a nanny and a driver… for 23 years.)

:D

Not sure if 8m pesos is all that bad....for educating a kid all the way from scratch through law school. What would it cost in the US, say...?

 

And how much is a nanny and driver once you leave the Philippines behind..?

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spooks

Ayala for pre kinder is about 120 thou a year including books and uniforms plus 30 thou registration fee if you are a foreigner, 15 thou if not. we booked it through my wife so the kids got Pinoy rates and they hold pinoy passports etc as well as Uk.  We are looking at moving away as well for similar reasons , yet we can wait until at least one more year perhaps two

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jigsy

I've said it before, but if I had to do it again, I would have gone back to my home country when the kids were between 6-8 years. After that, once they get into a particular system or other, you are almost compelled to keep them in it.

 

That said, if you want your kids to stay in the Philippines, there are reasonable value options. e.g. PAREF schools in Cebu, especially the girls option - Southcrest. Ateneo also of course has been mentioned.

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Brucewayne

We are sending our first grader to GTBA here in Tayud, Liloan.

This is their first year of school and so far, only foreigners are sending their children there.

They have filed papers to become an international School, but expect that to take around two years.

The tuition is P50,000 per year and anyone starting this year will have a frozen rate all the way up to the 6th grade.

One uniform, all books and materials are included as well as art supplies and any other materials needed for classroom participation.

The school is fully air conditioned, restroom in every classroom as well as public restrooms which can be entered from outside of the building, cctv in every room which is viewable in Admin and the parent's waiting area.

There is also a projection screen in every room for video instruction or entertainment on occasion.

I am planning on joining the PTA as well so I can in some way be in on the beginning phase of this new, modern school.

 

Edit; I nearly forgot,....no junk food or soda allowed, there is a canteen which the student purchases the meal of his or her choice with a prepaid lunch card (Debit style) or they can carry their lunches/have lunch delivered if they like.

Edited by Brucewayne
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SkyMan

Looks like a school for morons that believe their kid will be smarter if you throw more money at them. 

 

 

And how much is a nanny and driver once you leave the Philippines behind..?
Zero.  You'll have to actually interact with your kids yourself.  Can you imagine... Edited by SkyMan
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oscarpears

There are reasons why people are so "foolish" as to spend millions of pesos putting their children through international schools and such like, and not all the reasons are academic.  

The main reason are the astronomical fees associated with these establishments.

 

The rich want their children educated with the children of those who are just as wealthy or wealthier than they are.

They know from their own everyday experience that connections and contacts are more important than a good degree.

It is an exclusive club, open to anybody so long as you have shed-loads of money and a modicum of good manners.

 

For those of us who don't have those benefits then we must be serious about giving children the very best start in life.

Remember, education starts in the womb; a mother for example who drinks and smokes is already damaging her Childs prospects.   

 

A child is born out of a woman, not a photocopier, therefore accept that your son maybe more interested in ballet than baseball.

Your job from day one is to feed his/her mind, and teach them how to think, not what to think. When you unconsciously "brainwash" a child to think just like you do, all you will  get in the end a rebellious and confused young adult.

 

Too many parents do too little to motivate their children, a young child will imitate its parents, you can't encourage a child to read, if you are all day watching movies on a hand-held device, or to be playful and proactive if you are ensconced upon a sofa imbibing beer and yelling obscenities at the President.

Take them to art galleries, read to them and teach them to be courageous and dignified and how beauty comes from the immutable qualities within, not from some smug advertiser peddling the p*ornography of materialism. 
   

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Enuff

It's all about atmosphere

 

People spend millions in USA for their children to have a private education. Are those children smarter than publicly educated students . . . . . No! But they do have 4 + years at a well known and well respected institution plus lots of friends with the same history. Most times those alumni look out for each other giving special opportunities to each other.

 

So no guarantee your child will be smarter but definitely a better chance they will have more opportunities in their lifetime.

 

Currently the above described is exactly the problem with the world today. It's not what you know it's who you know.

 

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

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Kuting

Education is expensive period.  It is only because of tax support that the cost is reasonable (or free).  In other countries when you want international standards schooling the cost can be astronomical.  This internationl school education is normally paid by expat employers and governments (or very rich locals) so high price is not a problem for the school and they need to be high priced to attract international teaching staff with credentials (and I do understand some unqualified credential teachers are better - even much better - than some apparently highly qualified).

 

I think so too... The international schools in the PH, though very expensive, are actually cheaper compared to the international private schools abroad. If you do "like for like" comparison, then education in the PH is actually not too expensive... the best high school in the PH is even a government run school -- called Philippine Science High School--but this is very elitist and only a select few could get in.

 

We are sending our first grader to GTBA here in Tayud, Liloan.

This is their first year of school and so far, only foreigners are sending their children there.

They have filed papers to become an international School, but expect that to take around two years.

The tuition is P50,000 per year and anyone starting this year will have a frozen rate all the way up to the 6th grade.

One uniform, all books and materials are included as well as art supplies and any other materials needed for classroom participation.

The school is fully air conditioned, restroom in every classroom as well as public restrooms which can be entered from outside of the building, cctv in every room which is viewable in Admin and the parent's waiting area.

There is also a projection screen in every room for video instruction or entertainment on occasion.

I am planning on joining the PTA as well so I can in some way be in on the beginning phase of this new, modern school.

 

Edit; I nearly forgot,....no junk food or soda allowed, there is a canteen which the student purchases the meal of his or her choice with a prepaid lunch card (Debit style) or they can carry their lunches/have lunch delivered if they like.

Oh, this is very interesting. Hopefully if and when we do relocate to Cebu, this school would have gotten their IS certification then.. this would be the best option for us.. living the semi-rural area (avoiding the city) and yet kids still get into the international school, sounds just like what we're looking for. Thanks for the info :-)

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rainymike

Just my opinion, but if you are looking for your child to be successful in life, school is only part of the equation.  I think it's true whether you are in the Phils or in the states.

 

I also think that kids with the best test scores are not the best predictor for success in life. Lots of kids learn how to game the system. They succeed on paper and pencil tests but are miserable when it comes to doing things hands on in the real world.

 

Schools are probably not the 'best' in the Phils, but I don't think that's a deal breaker. There are lots of things that kids can be exposed to that will round out formal education.  How to round out the classroom in the Phils? Here's what works for me. 

 

Kids need to learn discipline. Be able to stay on task. Develop heart. Pick themselves up when they fall. At a young age, they can be introduced to extra curricular activities like music or sports. Not programs that try to make you into a child star or a super athlete, but programs that help develop discipline. You have to work at playing a piano or train at being a soccer player. If I was deep in the province, the alternative might be doing farm work. Later, I'll try to plug the kids into volunteer work in the community. Scouting is a start. 

 

Kids need to learn to be independent and creative thinkers. Schools often use cookbook curricula and teaching. I find that to be more problematic in Asian countries. But its a big problem stateside as well. For my oldest boy, I mandate study time for schoolwork and check on his performance - per school requirements. But I allow free time for him to do stuff that interests him. Right now, it's comic books, puzzle books, National Geographic tv, and catching bugs. His mind is active and developing in ways above and beyond what is delivered in the classroom. I try to encourage that. He is fully capable of creating his own alternative classroom and curriculum in his mind. At a later age, I'll try to give him access to the broader international Asian community (don't have a good plan for that yet).

 

Just a small sample of what else goes on in a child's life besides school. I believe these other activities are as important as what goes on inside of the classroom. I think its a mistake to think that school alone creates success in a child. In the end, I find education here affordable. I don't need the real expensive international schools. The Phils can be a decent place to be educated if you look beyond the brick and mortar classroom. 

 

Just my opinions. But it is why I'm not fretting raising my kids in this country - despite the drawbacks. And why I don't think I'm selling them short. 

Edited by rainymike
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