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ROVER

Speaking Cebuano Pronunciation Confusion

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ROVER

In the eleven years that I have been here I have found that no matter how much I want to learn Cebuano it seems almost fruitless and here is why I come to this conclusion. (Pronunciation)!

 

It seems like everyone has their own pronunciation of a word and if you learn from one person and they tell you "perfect"....then the next person you speak with will smugly or laughingly tell you that you are mispronouncing the word or it is the wrong word.

 

So if you change it, the next person tells you (THAT) is the wrong pronunciation or wrong word.

 

Now I used to think it was just me, you know blaming in on my hearing or stroke or whatever.

 

But then I started watching and listening and the locals do the same thing with each other,,,,

 

You have three people talking #1 says something to #2.

# 2 says "huh?" and this is repeated 3 or 4 times until

# 3 tells #2 what #1 said...

# 2 then says "ah..." or "emm" and they all smile and look at each other like "ah...we took care of that"....

 

Now I am not trying to put anybody down my wife and her family do the same thing and I have seen it everywhere I go.....

 

So I guess my question is "IF YOU WANT TO LEARN CEBUANO BUT DON'T WANT TO BE LAUGHED AT, and DON'T KNOW which way to pronounce it for which people.....

 

(WHAT DO YOU DO?) :banghead:

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contraman

I have never conscientiously tried to learn Cebuano, but spending so much time here I have picked up a few sayings.

Sure I get laughed at, but I am a big ugly bugger, so its like water off a ducks back

However, what I do is turn it into a joke, and in almost every case, it ends with a great conversation in english with both parties laughing.

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hyaku

Like any language you have to learn from someone who doesn't speak with a strong dialect. I used to teach kids raised by grandparents who had very strong accents. Its not until they enter education that their pronunciation and language becomes more standardized.

 

Keep notebooks, list nouns, adjectives, verbs etc separately. Then another for sentence construction. Write it down how it sounds to you once you've determined correct pronunciation .

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Hy H

hyaku & contraman.....you guys have a similar easygoing outlook to this issue.....going by your avatars...are you guys related by any change?

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contraman

hyaku & contraman.....you guys have a similar easygoing outlook to this issue.....going by your avatars...are you guys related by any change?

No, But I think our Avatars may be in love  :bighug:

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Art

I don't know what you will do I spent a year learning Cebuano from a native speaker, Cebu City Cebuano.   I learnt the grammer and structure of the language and the rules of organising it I still have all my notes.   I will never learn another language that way again as it basically doesn't work.   It took me a long while and a lot of research to arrive at a different idea of language learning.

 

Here is a youtube video of Stephen Krashen explaining his theory in a practical way. 

 

His theory of Comprehensible Imput makes a lot of sense to me after failing in learning a lot of different languages.  :)

 

You need to spend a lot of time listening, a lot of time. Active listening for about 20 or 30 mins then a break for 10 minutes seems to recharge concentration and memory.  Your brain learns what it wants to learn.  Forgetting is a normal thing and its only through repetition that eventually the brain remembers.  You can't consciously decide what goes into Long term memory.  Repetition helps.  Cramming doesn't help as it's mostly short term memory.   Half an hour everyday will see improvement over time, consistence seems to be more important than intensity. 

 

Paul Sulzberger, a New Zealand university teacher of Russian experimented with his students after observing drop out patterns in the early stages in learning the language and found those students exposed to Russian before beginning the course did better because they were used to the sound of the language even though they didn't understand it.

 

A problem for me was the lack of audio in Cebuano if I was to go back to learning it I would search for or make mp3 recordings I could listen to while doing other things and repeat it over and over again.  Songs, movies or tv shows in Cebuano help exposure if you can find them.

 

Reading Cebuano I found it hard to find books or written Cebuano, articles etc.  You could get a copy of the Bible in Cebuano I found one once written in the early 20th cent I don't know how relevant the language is a 100 years later as language changes.   You could make a recording of someone reading it in Cebuano so you could listen and read along with it.  Having different voices will help too as you can get used to one voice and not others.

 

Listening and reading the language is most important along with repetition will help you hear and understand eventually.   You have to decide if you want to learn standard Cebuano or local Cebuano.  Its like if you want to learn international English or American southern English same as standard British or regional British.  

 

You learn a language to communicate you have to decide if its just your wife and local community or a wider group then make or find the materials to help you listen and read it, speaking will come one day after a lot of exposure.   Before you can express yourself you have to know the words and sounds first.

 

I found out the grammer rules are built into the language and we know it by whether it sounds right or not, that comes after a massive lot of exposure to the language.  Native speakers of any language do not know their grammer unless they are grammer teachers.  :)

 

 

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Kuting

I don't know what you will do I spent a year learning Cebuano from a native speaker, Cebu City Cebuano.   I learnt the grammer and structure of the language and the rules of organising it I still have all my notes.   I will never learn another language that way again as it basically doesn't work.   It took me a long while and a lot of research to arrive at a different idea of language learning.

 

Here is a youtube video of Stephen Krashen explaining his theory in a practical way. 

 

His theory of Comprehensible Imput makes a lot of sense to me after failing in learning a lot of different languages.  :)

 

You need to spend a lot of time listening, a lot of time. Active listening for about 20 or 30 mins then a break for 10 minutes seems to recharge concentration and memory.  Your brain learns what it wants to learn.  Forgetting is a normal thing and its only through repetition that eventually the brain remembers.  You can't consciously decide what goes into Long term memory.  Repetition helps.  Cramming doesn't help as it's mostly short term memory.   Half an hour everyday will see improvement over time, consistence seems to be more important than intensity. 

 

Paul Sulzberger, a New Zealand university teacher of Russian experimented with his students after observing drop out patterns in the early stages in learning the language and found those students exposed to Russian before beginning the course did better because they were used to the sound of the language even though they didn't understand it.

 

A problem for me was the lack of audio in Cebuano if I was to go back to learning it I would search for or make mp3 recordings I could listen to while doing other things and repeat it over and over again.  Songs, movies or tv shows in Cebuano help exposure if you can find them.

 

Reading Cebuano I found it hard to find books or written Cebuano, articles etc.  You could get a copy of the Bible in Cebuano I found one once written in the early 20th cent I don't know how relevant the language is a 100 years later as language changes.   You could make a recording of someone reading it in Cebuano so you could listen and read along with it.  Having different voices will help too as you can get used to one voice and not others.

 

Listening and reading the language is most important along with repetition will help you hear and understand eventually.   You have to decide if you want to learn standard Cebuano or local Cebuano.  Its like if you want to learn international English or American southern English same as standard British or regional British.  

 

You learn a language to communicate you have to decide if its just your wife and local community or a wider group then make or find the materials to help you listen and read it, speaking will come one day after a lot of exposure.   Before you can express yourself you have to know the words and sounds first.

 

I found out the grammer rules are built into the language and we know it by whether it sounds right or not, that comes after a massive lot of exposure to the language.  Native speakers of any language do not know their grammer unless they are grammer teachers.  :)

 

I agree with this. I studied Japanese in the PH for 6 months and didn't learn a thing. But only one month immersion in Japan and things were starting to make sense! But sometimes, it is also whether the person has the bi- or multi-lingual "ability"... like Math, some people get it quicker than the others, some don't even get it at all.

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Half Baked

Just speak English. If they don't understand, speak English louder!

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contraman

Just speak English. If they don't understand, speak English louder!

Exactly, It works every time   :thumbs_up:

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Hamm

Just speak English. If they don't understand, speak English louder!

 

 

Yes, but that's no fun. Fun is the look of shock that almost always happens when you respond in their native lingo.

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Half Baked

Yes, but that's no fun. Fun is the look of shock that almost always happens when you respond in their native lingo.

Yes, I've tried that also. But they then dont understand their own Visayan language from Kanos.

 

Same thing happened to me in the Dominican Republic, I tried to speak to them in their own language, Spanish......... but they misunderstood me less in English!

 

Its a big ol' goofy world!!

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Lee

I feel it is more important to learn it to understand what is going on around me than to speak it. I only speak it when the person does not understand my English or to show some Filipino friends that I may understand some of their language and then I try to be short and to the point. When in the Philippines I often find myself speaking more than I really should.

 

I have seen many province Filipinos laugh at their own people when they try to speak English, so it does not bother me if they laugh at me as long as they understand what I was trying to get across. 

 

Some of the pronunciation comes from the nose or deep inside and I know that I will never be able to pronounce those.

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contraman

Yes, but that's no fun. Fun is the look of shock that almost always happens when you respond in their native lingo.

Yes, You can always use that as a last resort  :db:

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Half Baked

 

 

I feel it is more important to learn it to understand what is going on around me than to speak it.

:thumbsup:

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Enuff

To me when filipinos talk it always sounds like they are yelling.

 

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

Edited by bigmook
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