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Steel deck picnic, USS Blueridge LCC 19, me old ship


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Salty Dog

Long Beach....me too. We would always come in about 07:00 an the meet and greet families that would always be there...for us!

 

My old destroyer , plus our squadron mates/ships would follow behind us.

 

 

To see my wife again was...wonderful!

 

Me three. The Glacier was homeported out of Long Beach, but not on a base.

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Our Navy hard at work...movie time.

My first ship boat. Notice the lack of deck space for picnics?  

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Mikala

 

 

Submariners: 300 men go to sea,150 couples return home.

 

Hmm... might need some tweaking for a fast-attack submarine. With 12 officers and 98 MEN, you could say 110 men go to sea and 55 couples return home.

 

 

Actually though, in real life, I never saw any homosexual activity onboard during my 6 years. There was plenty of hetrosexual activity when we'd have wives and gfs visit. Plenty of divorced guys when they came into port to find their wives waiting with the papers. Maybe it was confined to ballistic missile submarines??  :stick_poke:

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Mr. Mike

How'd that joke go?

 

Submariners: 300 men go to sea,150 couples return home.

Hey Paul, I know you are kidding.

 

The most emotional event you will ever witness, is when a warship goes to sea on a long deployment... a lot of sadness... wives, and children crying and confused....but really... when the ship returns to homeport...many months later! That is emotional! The happiest day/s of my life!

 

On the way home from Westpac.... takes about three weeks.... the crew would start to stand down and relax. When we reached Pearl Harbor......for fresh milk and supplies.....we were five days away from Long Beach....home free!

 

We are in high spirits and know we are only about five days from home( Long Beach)....

 

From Pearl to Long Beach...the ship was in total zombee mode....it was called "channel fever"

 

The "watches" were light (less manned). Movies were run all night long, with popcorn!......the nautical miles home were counted by the hour!

 

Spooky actually....

 

The morning our squadron broke through the mist , entered the Long Beach breakwater, and saw hundreds of our family members there to meet us....I'll never forget it!

 

Every one of us looked for a face of someone we loved...

 

We were home again.....

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sugbu777

Hey Paul, I know you are kidding.

 

The most emotional event you will ever witness, is when a warship goes to sea on a long deployment... a lot of sadness... wives, and children crying and confused....but really... when the ship returns to homeport...many months later! That is emotional! The happiest day/s of my life!

 

On the way home from Westpac.... takes about three weeks.... the crew would start to stand down and relax. When we reached Pearl Harbor......for fresh milk and supplies.....we were five days away from Long Beach....home free!

 

We are in high spirits and know we are only about five days from home( Long Beach)....

 

From Pearl to Long Beach...the ship was in total zombee mode....it was called "channel fever"

 

The "watches" were light (less manned). Movies were run all night long, with popcorn!......the nautical miles home were counted by the hour!

 

Spooky actually....

 

The morning our squadron broke through the mist , entered the Long Beach breakwater, and saw hundreds of our family members there to meet us....I'll never forget it!

 

Every one of us looked for a face of someone we loved...

 

We were home again.....

"Channel Fever" is hard to describe. Like you said, after a WestPac it starts after leaving Hawaii. I can relate to all you posted except for the reduced watches. We never, ever had reduced watches in Radio.

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I was an E7 Electronic Warfare tech. Operated and maintained active and passive EW equipment.Great job!

 

I'm also retired EWC.

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Mikala

 

 

We never, ever had reduced watches in Radio.

 

Sometimes, as a Reactor operator, we'd go to 6 hours on and 6 hours off. Called it Port and Starboard. Depends on personnel staffing. At least in port, we'd be down to 3 men in the engineering spaces (aft).

 

Once, after a WestPAC, we docked in Perth and everyone wanted to leave since we must have had over 200 Australian girls wanting to take us on 'dates'. They'd sign up on the board topside and you'd just go topside, pick one off the board, give them a call and they'd come meet you. What a wonderful place to visit. Lots of drinking and loose women!!! When we left (2 weeks later), a dozen guys didn't bother coming back to the boat. Of course, a few days later, dozens of guys were needing some shots from the corpsman too!   :yahoo:   :wave:

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Mr. Mike

"Channel Fever" is hard to describe. Like you said, after a WestPac it starts after leaving Hawaii. I can relate to all you posted except for the reduced watches. We never, ever had reduced watches in Radio.

Understood...you were radio...gotta keep the guard. I was in CIC...a three man watch, one on the scope, one .....Okay on standby...and one in the back trying to get some ZZZZ's

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sugbu777

 

 

Sometimes, as a Reactor operator, we'd go to 6 hours on and 6 hours off. Called it Port and Starboard.

 

P & S, 8 on 8 off in most Radio Shacks, some were even 12 and 12. We even did a 24 and 24 in the Gulf just so we could get some liberty.

The only time we could go in to a regular watchbill like the rest of the ship when inport was if that port had a facility we could drop the communications guard to. That wasn't many places. I recall two places in Japan, one in Korea and one in the Philippines we could do that. The rest we had to stand underway watches inport to maintain the comm guard. Kinda the same as the engineers having to steam inport if there was no shore power available. When I was on a fleet ocean tug out of Subic, we used to go to Hong Kong 5 times a year with generators on the aft of the ship. We would provide shore power for visiting submarines so they could get some liberty.

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Mr. Mike

I'm also retired EWC.

Did you go to EW school in Treasure Island?

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sugbu777

 

 

Of course, a few days later, dozens of guys were needing some shots from the corpsman too!

 

Trobicin...breakfast of champions! :wink:

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Salty Dog

One of the more interesting vessels I worked with. I was part of the inspection team that did the initial Coast Guard Certification for the Boeing Hydrofoil.

 

otherwebvictoriaboeingjetfoil929115.jpg

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Paul

 

 

Hey Paul, I know you are kidding.

 

Absolutely. It was a military joke a friend once told a mutual friend ours, I"m pretty sure. 

 

When I was a teen, I had some knee problems and had to have arthroscopic knee surgeries. It was a new process back then.

 

Anyway, by the time I was 18, I wanted to enlist in the Navy. Submariners, in fact, is where I wanted to go.

 

They turned me down. 

 

I recall how jealous I was when I learned a long time school mate had gone the same exact route and was accepted. 

 

I reckon they figured I would hit 'em up for a disability later? Not sure.

 

I was talking with someone, this is after I moved to Cebu, about it. I learned from a retired Navy guy I knew, that the military had too many people enlisting during that time and could afford to be as picky as they wanted to be during the Reagan years. Not sure, but it sounded as though that could have been as good of a reason as any. 

 

As you know, I have the utmost respect for the Military personnel on this forum, and in life in general. I, very much, wanted to be part of that. Unfortunately, it just wasn't in the cards for me. That's why I love hearing (reading) about such lives that were lived. I will go out of my way for anyone who served, and certainly on this forum. 


 

 

Hmm... might need some tweaking for a fast-attack submarine. With 12 officers and 98 MEN, you could say 110 men go to sea and 55 couples return home.

 

Shows ya how much I know about submarines, even today.

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Mr. Mike

When I graduated high school, I was not ready for college. My father..ex Army Captain suggested the military. He convinced me the training in the navy was the best, and provided the most opportunities. I remember looking at him with glazed eyes and thinking...he's trying to kick me out of the house already!  I was planning on hanging around for a few years and live there for free. :yahoo:

 

That was not going to happen! no, no, no....

 

He also said the navy chow was pretty damn good as well...so off I went to join the navy.

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Salty Dog

I always heard that when the Navy builds a base, that they start with the piers, fuel depots, supply depots and so on.  Personnel needs being the last thing they build.

 

When the Air Force builds a base, they start with the officer and enlisted clubs, commissary, base exchange, housing and so on. When all thats done they think about a runway.   :biggrin_01:

 

It's not far off either. I spent nearly a year at two different Air Force bases as an E-4. I had a nice private room at one and a semi-private room at the other. Both with their own private bathrooms.

 

When I was an officer and going to school at a Coast Guard base. I shared a room with three other men and there was a communal bathroom.

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