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Can someone explain what 100% disability means?


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Jason S

 

 

Is it the catch all though for any alignment a 65 year old Vet comes down with 40 years after they served? Maybe, who knows

     That is the catch 22 with the VA Disability system. It is almost impossible to know for sure if a disability someone is claiming, is from their military service 30-40 years prior unless they had a documented accident while on active duty. Personally, I agree with everything you said and I will take it a step further and say IMO I think there are a lot more younger Veterans playing the system than people realize or are willing to say.

     What I can’t wrap my mind around is how someone that has a 100% service connected disability through the VA, without any outward physical issues, can work a full time job and be mentally and physically stable enough to do it. Yet someone that is a triple amputee, and is obviously screwed for life, gets the same 100% rating and doesn't get any more assistance from the government. 

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One of the things I have experienced in some bars here in Cebu, are guys openly boasting about how they are using the system to collect money that (even they know) they are fraudulently claiming.  

Whatever 100% disability for vets means, it means that a VA doctor who is told to reject as many claims as possible, has decided that the person in question is entitled to that rating and while I did

I've seen many so called 100% disabled veterans that work full time, play tennis, ride a motorcycle or do just about anything they want. My father worked at the USPS and there were numerous 100% disab

lamoe

I have what might be symptoms  and have been denied every time  No wonder I'm a cranky old fart. Have been approved for hearing loss and PTSD - mild not severe.

 

Neurological

episodes of violence, anger, depression, memory loss and lack of concentration. Tingling, numbness, headaches, twitching and loss of sensation are also symptoms related to the neurological impact of Agent Orange exposure.

 

Intestinal Distress

11 months in hospital  1970 - conclusion? FOOD POISONING - Some symptoms include abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and constipation.gastric hyperplasia and ulcers .

 

Cancer

acne,  brittle nails, 

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Alan S

I can understand that it differs according to WHO decides.

The military will obviously have a different criteria to other organisations.

 

As for 100% disabled and still working, I can quite understand that.

As one example, take Stephen Hawking..

There is no doubt whatsoever that he is disabled, but still managed to hold top jobs in a University, write books, do research, etc.

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Salty Dog

For American Vets, the VA has 100 % schedular and IU 100 % (unemployability) ratings. If you are rated as 100 % schedular by the VA, you can still hold a job with no limitations put on you. If you are rated as 100 % IU (unemployability) you are only allowed to be marginally employed. You can only make a certain amount of money, and if you make more that marginally amount of money, your IU rating will be reviewed for possible reduction in your current rating!

 

VA compensation benefits are generally rated on a schedule between 10 and 100, depending on the disability and degrees of disability.  However, in VA world the combination of the ratings is not a simple matter.  To most of us, 30 + 20 = 50.  in VA world, 30% + 20% = 40%.  The reason for the unique combination of ratings according to 38 C.F.R. §4.25 is that, “the consideration of the efficiency of the individual as affected first by the most disabling condition, then by the less disabling condition, then by other less disabling conditions, if any, in the order of severity.”  Therefore, if a veteran has one disability, for example PTSD, rated at 30% impairment, and another disability, for example diabetes mellitus type II, rated at 20%, based on the combined ratings table, this veteran would be assigned a rating of 40%.

 

One can see that if a veteran has several smaller ratings, it can be difficult to reach a 100% rating.  However, ratings 10% through 90% net substantially lower benefits than a 100% rating.  Currently, a veteran with no dependants who is rated at 100% is $2,769.00.  However, a 50% rating is only $797.00 and a 90% rating is $1,661.00.  An attorney or advocate reviewing your case should assess whether achieving a 100% schedular rating is likely or possible.

 

Another way to achieve 100% without the restrictions inherent in the combined ratings table is to argue total disability due to individual unemployability.  38 C.F.R. §4.16 provides that if a veteran has a rating of 60% or higher for one disability, or a combined 70% rating based on at least one disability rated at 40% and the veteran is unemployable due to service connected disabilities, the veteran is entitled to receive compensation at the 100% rate.  Even if the veteran does not meet the rating standards, if they are unemployable due to their service connected conditions they may still be eligible for this benefit.

 

Notice that just getting the proper rating amount is not enough.  The service connected disability must also be the reason the veteran is unable to obtain substantial gainful employment.  However, the existence of non-service connected disabilities is to be “disregarded” if the percentages for the service-connected disabilities are met and cause the veteran to be unemployable.

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jtmwatchbiz

 

 

Still working on some of my previously denied and new claims now and I know I will eventually get what I deserve for my 30 yrs of service to the U.S. Government!

 

 

did you not collect pay checks while you were working those 30 yrs? 

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smokey

I agree 100% that service people deserve everything owing and then more....I think it could have got lost in the change over but we were talking about expats on disability claimed benefits etc etc...so the question was seeking some sort of clarification as to full disability and what constitutes complete disability in general terms......no big issue just a curious mind.....

I think in the case of military its a number put on the persons ailment that affected his chances of earning more money ...... a simple way to look at it as I UNDERSTAND is ...  Lets say a pro bowler who can bowl with his left arm as well as his right ....  He earns 50,000 us a year... now because of his military injury  he has lost the use of his right arm he can still bowl but his earnings are now not as good and will not last as long so they pick a number and pay the guy a amount to make up for his Loss... so you see him still bowling but wonder why he gets disability

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smokey

So someone can be classified as 100% disabled, but still be able to go about their normal business and go scuba diving etc?

sure in a sense lets say your a professional gambler and scuba diver and a company or government caused you or placed you in a spot where you lost your eyes and your ability go earn a living at your chosen profession.. now you may be blind and cant gamble as you did before and that would make you in this type of job 100% disabled but you can still scuba dive even if its with a buddy to guide you  

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smokey

Agent Orange, although the Military denied it's effect for years, it's been pretty universally accepted that it was some bad stuff and messed up thousands of servicemembers.

 

Is it the catch all though for any alignment a 65 year old Vet comes down with 40 years after they served? Maybe, who knows.

 

What about the hundreds of thousands of Vets who were never exposed to it though?

 

Most Vets I've talked to who have a rated disability, didn't get it from Agent Orange Exposure.

 

I guess I was lucky in this regard. As a Marine Inspector, I conducted internal inspections of tanks carrying just about every known hazardous material that was carried in bulk on ships or barges. The Coast Guard recognized the hazards involved and in addition to providing the latest protective gear, they also enrolled us in an Occupational Hygiene Monitoring program that included regular medical monitoring, physical exams and extensive blood testing.

the way to get a rating for agent orange is to show you were there ,, you were close to where it was used and YOU have one of the cancers it causes so I sure the heck don't want their disability of which I understand is 20% or about 300 us a month , I was told it was safe also and we used it to wash our hands as its like a solvent not everyone got sick from it but the government don't give money on MAYBE you will get sick they give it on YOUR ALREADY SICK 

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smokey

     That is the catch 22 with the VA Disability system. It is almost impossible to know for sure if a disability someone is claiming, is from their military service 30-40 years prior unless they had a documented accident while on active duty. Personally, I agree with everything you said and I will take it a step further and say IMO I think there are a lot more younger Veterans playing the system than people realize or are willing to say.

     What I can’t wrap my mind around is how someone that has a 100% service connected disability through the VA, without any outward physical issues, can work a full time job and be mentally and physically stable enough to do it. Yet someone that is a triple amputee, and is obviously screwed for life, gets the same 100% rating and doesn't get any more assistance from the government. 

the reason you see more vets getting disability is not because of their disability but because of the internet ...knowledge is there now... 

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Salty Dog

the way to get a rating for agent orange is to show you were there ,, you were close to where it was used and YOU have one of the cancers it causes so I sure the heck don't want their disability of which I understand is 20% or about 300 us a month , I was told it was safe also and we used it to wash our hands as its like a solvent not everyone got sick from it but the government don't give money on MAYBE you will get sick they give it on YOUR ALREADY SICK 

 

Just like many of us use to use acetone to wash our hands.

 

Just being in a country where Agent Orange is used or stored is a lot different than being exposed to it.

 

Lile a previous poster stated, it was stored in Thailand and even the USA. You can be around the most deadly substance in the world, but if it's stored or enclosed in a air/liquid tight container, you can hardly say you were exposed to it.

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smokey

Just like many of us use to use acetone to wash our hands.

 

Just being in a country where Agent Orange is used or stored is a lot different than being exposed to it.

 

Lile a previous poster stated, it was stored in Thailand and even the USA. You can be around the most deadly substance in the world, but if it's stored or enclosed in a air/liquid tight container, you can hardly say you were exposed to it.

well being young I volunteered to fly the spray bird many times...  <<<    before we sprayed the fields we very often took a sample so it was a very sort after job..

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Salty Dog

well being young I volunteered to fly the spray bird many times...  <<<    before we sprayed the fields we very often took a sample so it was a very sort after job..

 

So you were right in it, but you don't have a disability.

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NOSOCALPINOY

Just like many of us use to use acetone to wash our hands.

 

Just being in a country where Agent Orange is used or stored is a lot different than being exposed to it.

 

Lile a previous poster stated, it was stored in Thailand and even the USA. You can be around the most deadly substance in the world, but if it's stored or enclosed in a air/liquid tight container, you can hardly say you were exposed to it.

That's why the new VA agent orange criteria says it's "presumptive in nature" as long it was stored, transferred and eventually used where one was stationed at!

What's so difficult about comprehending VA's new ruling?   

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NOSOCALPINOY

did you not collect pay checks while you were working those 30 yrs? 

Were you ever in the military and received military wages? I imagine or assume you did not, since you asked that question! 

I remember back in the days when some of the military member's wives and children in tow were at the check out counter paying for their groceries with food stamps they got from the Welfare Department!

Only after 30 to 40 yrs later did things get better for the men and women in all branches of the military when it comes to their military wages, benefits and allowances!  

So, all of you civilians out there and or disgruntled military retirees, don't begrudge us our earned entitlements for performing our obligated duties for our country, the United States of America!    

Edited by NOSOCALPINOY
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