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Can someone explain what 100% disability means?


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mpt1947

Since this topic is not in Military: Active, Reserve, Disabled or Retired Veteran Forum, I will not provide an answer for you...

 

There are different definitions for different organizations and countries - so if the OP is from Oz, I would suggest doing a search in your home countries.  If you are an American, Military, Disabled - start a topic over there and I will provide instructions on how different ratings are determined.

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One of the things I have experienced in some bars here in Cebu, are guys openly boasting about how they are using the system to collect money that (even they know) they are fraudulently claiming.  

Whatever 100% disability for vets means, it means that a VA doctor who is told to reject as many claims as possible, has decided that the person in question is entitled to that rating and while I did

I've seen many so called 100% disabled veterans that work full time, play tennis, ride a motorcycle or do just about anything they want. My father worked at the USPS and there were numerous 100% disab

cebubird

a GREAT BIG THANK YOU Mike. That is exactly why I didn't chime in, even tho' Lamoe was nice enough to do do so.

It appeared to me as another of those "slam" American things.

Thanks to Alan and Paulas well.

Edited by cebubird
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ozboy

Actually cebubird if you read back it had nothing to do with slamming anybody or anything..it was just a question on an entirely different subject that was moved by a mod and started up as a new one...

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cebubird

Actually cebubird if you read back it had nothing to do with slamming anybody or anything..it was just a question on an entirely different subject that was moved by a mod and started up as a new one...

 

I know ozboy and if you notice I didn't say YOU had started it for that reason, as your question seemed to be genuine. It just sort of got pulled in that direction. No offense directed at you.

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contraman

Paul

Thanks for at least responding, something that many others would not do.

Still does not change what I have seen with my own eyes and for which I am disgusted.

Cheers

Ken

Ps

Think you may have meant " fair Forum"

Edited by contraman
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Mattnlenny

So someone can be classified as 100% disabled, but still be able to go about their normal business and go scuba diving etc?

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Paul

Actually cebubird if you read back it had nothing to do with slamming anybody or anything..it was just a question on an entirely different subject that was moved by a mod and started up as a new one...

 

I split it from another topic, making it into one all its own. I feel it was a great question to ask. And, by all means, a question that should be addressed in the Military Forum on this site, as well..

 

 

Paul

Thanks for at least responding, something that many others would not do.

Still does not change what I have seen with my own eyes and for which I am disgusted.

Cheers

Ken

Ps

Think you may have meant " fair Forum"

 

Thanks. I cleared up the typo.

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NOSOCALPINOY
Yes, the U.S. government has been begrudgingly denying a lot of VA claims from Veterans from military service connected disabilities and are now just getting approval after all these years! 

I for one have disabilities, but one would never see or notice it unless one has read my complete medical transcripts. I'm not yet 100% disabled on paper, which I should be physically, but getting there as the years go by due to the denials and neglect by the VA bureaucracy has put me through in denying some of my bonafide claims through the initial process when there wasn't anyone around back in those days to help me file my claims correctly! Still working on some of my previously denied and new claims now and I know I will eventually get what I deserve for my 30 yrs of service to the U.S. Government!     

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ozboy

I agree 100% that service people deserve everything owing and then more....I think it could have got lost in the change over but we were talking about expats on disability claimed benefits etc etc...so the question was seeking some sort of clarification as to full disability and what constitutes complete disability in general terms......no big issue just a curious mind.....

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Davaoeno

Altho the friend that I mentioned is mobile and can ride a m/c etc i dare anyone to say that he doesnt deserve every penny that he gets because of being determined as 100% disabled.  He is on a huge amount of medications [ many for mental problems that were a result of his captivity ]

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Salty Dog
I've seen many so called 100% disabled veterans that work full time, play tennis, ride a motorcycle or do just about anything they want. My father worked at the USPS and there were numerous 100% disabled vets working there. Disabled vets collect close to $3,000 tax free a month. That's more than many retired servicemen receive after 20-30 years of service.

 

Some vets have been out of the military for 20-30 years when they claimed to be disabled. Go to a VA clinic in the states and most of the people there are 65+. If there are so many service connected disabilities, than why do I hardly ever see younger vets there? I've met several vets here in the Philippines who have been out of the service for 30-40 years and are just now trying to get VA disability for some ailment they recently came down with. Sore backs or joints, high blood pressure, diabetes and cancer are all things people seek disability for. Hell who among us doesn't suffer from something as they get old. Never could figure out how getting high blood pressure 30 years after someone served a few years in the military could be determined to be service connected. Many people get diabetes because they are overweight. Hardly a service connected condition since your not allowed to be overweight in the military. 

 

Yes I know there are numerous disabilities that may not be apparent just by looking at someone. But who among us hasn't watched a car with disabled plates pull into a disabled parking spot and witness the driver spring from the car and sprint into the store as though there was nothing wrong with them.

 

If you can get it though, more power to you. To some people it's the American way to get as much from the government as they can. Not many people would turn down money or benefits if they can get it legally.

 

I know there are many vets on the forum, some who collect disability and I'm sure I will get an ear full from several of you. If you feel you personally deserve it (not just earned it), than there is no reason for an angry response, since obviously your not one of those I'm referring too. But can you honestly tell me you haven't known someone collecting disability of some sort who doesn't deserve it?

 

I'm sorry if I sound a little bitter. After serving 32 years in the military, the VA in Manila wouldn't treat me even if i was dying, because I'm not rated service connected disabled. The VA has a "means test" and because I collect a retirement, they say I make too much money to receive free medical. At least in the US I can go to a VA facility if I'm willing to pay for the services. If however a vet is 100% disabled, they can work full time, still collect their tax free payment and get free medical for not only themselves but their family.

 

I know some vets feel that all vets should be entitled too free medical the rest of their lives. Unfortunately this is not the case and the current system seems to be as messed up as the SSI system of disability compensation.

 

Oh by the way, I would probably be considered 100% physically disabled because I never fully recovered from my bought with GBS, but I don't collect a disability from the VA or SSI.

Edited by Salty Dog
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Lee
Symptoms of Agent Orange in Vietnam Veterans

 

Neurological

Troublesome symptoms that many Vietnam veterans began to go through were neurological problems. These symptoms generally started off with blurry or burning vision with episodes of violence, anger, depression, frenzy, memory loss and lack of concentration. Some vets expressed episodes of severe personality changes and suicidal behavior. Tingling, numbness, headaches, twitching and loss of sensation are also symptoms related to the neurological impact of Agent Orange exposure.

Intestinal Distress

Problems related to gastrointestinal distress were common among Vietnam vets who were exposed to Agent Orange. Some symptoms include abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and constipation. Some more extreme conditions include jaundice or a yellowing of the skin and extremities, hepatitis or liver inflammation, gastric hyperplasia and ulcers.

Birth defects

One unfortunate effect from Agent Orange exposure was the veterans passing along birth defects to their future offspring. These include an enlarged head, liver, cleft palate, hemorrhage, abnormal or missing digits on hands or feet and displaced or missing body parts or organs. Birth defects occurred in many pregnancies even without prior symptoms or knowledge of Agent Orange exposure.

Cancer

One of the most troubling side effects to Agent Orange exposure is developing different types of cancer. Months and sometimes years after exposure, Vietnam veterans experienced symptoms at the onset or in some cases the advanced stages of their disease. Weight loss, chills, fever, skin growths and tumors and extreme fatigue were some of the symptoms. Liver, lung, ear duct and testicular cancer were some of the cancers that were believed to have arisen from Agent Orange.

Skin

Many veterans exposed to Agent Orange noticed vast changes in their skin. Symptoms included rashes, acne, hair loss, brittle nails or nails that fell off, changes in skin color and increased sensitivity to heat and direct sunlight. Veterans may have experienced all or only one of the symptoms.

 

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Salty Dog

Symptoms of Agent Orange in Vietnam Veterans

 

Neurological

Troublesome symptoms that many Vietnam veterans began to go through were neurological problems. These symptoms generally started off with blurry or burning vision with episodes of violence, anger, depression, frenzy, memory loss and lack of concentration. Some vets expressed episodes of severe personality changes and suicidal behavior. Tingling, numbness, headaches, twitching and loss of sensation are also symptoms related to the neurological impact of Agent Orange exposure.

Intestinal Distress

Problems related to gastrointestinal distress were common among Vietnam vets who were exposed to Agent Orange. Some symptoms include abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and constipation. Some more extreme conditions include jaundice or a yellowing of the skin and extremities, hepatitis or liver inflammation, gastric hyperplasia and ulcers.

Birth defects

One unfortunate effect from Agent Orange exposure was the veterans passing along birth defects to their future offspring. These include an enlarged head, liver, cleft palate, hemorrhage, abnormal or missing digits on hands or feet and displaced or missing body parts or organs. Birth defects occurred in many pregnancies even without prior symptoms or knowledge of Agent Orange exposure.

Cancer

One of the most troubling side effects to Agent Orange exposure is developing different types of cancer. Months and sometimes years after exposure, Vietnam veterans experienced symptoms at the onset or in some cases the advanced stages of their disease. Weight loss, chills, fever, skin growths and tumors and extreme fatigue were some of the symptoms. Liver, lung, ear duct and testicular cancer were some of the cancers that were believed to have arisen from Agent Orange.

Skin

Many veterans exposed to Agent Orange noticed vast changes in their skin. Symptoms included rashes, acne, hair loss, brittle nails or nails that fell off, changes in skin color and increased sensitivity to heat and direct sunlight. Veterans may have experienced all or only one of the symptoms.

 

 

Agent Orange, although the Military denied it's effect for years, it's been pretty universally accepted that it was some bad stuff and messed up thousands of servicemembers.

 

Is it the catch all though for any alignment a 65 year old Vet comes down with 40 years after they served? Maybe, who knows.

 

What about the hundreds of thousands of Vets who were never exposed to it though?

 

Most Vets I've talked to who have a rated disability, didn't get it from Agent Orange Exposure.

 

I guess I was lucky in this regard. As a Marine Inspector, I conducted internal inspections of tanks carrying just about every known hazardous material that was carried in bulk on ships or barges. The Coast Guard recognized the hazards involved and in addition to providing the latest protective gear, they also enrolled us in an Occupational Hygiene Monitoring program that included regular medical monitoring, physical exams and extensive blood testing.

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NOSOCALPINOY

As a Marine Inspector, I conducted internal inspections of tanks carrying just about every known hazardous material that was carried in bulk on ships or barges. The Coast Guard recognized the hazards involved and in addition to providing the latest protective gear, they also enrolled us in an Occupational Hygiene Monitoring program that included regular medical monitoring, physical exams and extensive blood testing.

 

 

If that is the case, see this article to see if you fall under the new criteria related to herbicides! I myself didn't even know about the new presumption criteria relating to agent orange until I started to look into it when I developed diabetes type 2 and cancer of the bladder years later after leaving Thailand after 2 yrs stationed there. I was stationed in Thailand during the Vietnam era where agent orange was stock piled other than in Vietnam! They even have a list where agent orange was also stock piled in the U.S.! 

 

http://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/claims-postservice-questionnaire-claimherbicide.asp

Filing Claims for Service-Connection for Conditions VA Presumes Are Related to Exposure to Herbicides

On October 13, 2009, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced that three new conditions would be added to the list of diseases presumptively associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents: hairy cell and other B-cell leukemias, Parkinson's disease, and ischemic heart disease. This web site was created to provide general information about filing claims for service connection for these conditions.

VA began adjudicating these claims on October 30, 2010.

The questions and information on this website will ensure a Veteran or surviving family member understands the criteria for service connection and the evidence that is required to submit a complete claim.

Additional Agent Orange information can be found at  http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/benefits.asp

A completed list of Complete list of current Veterans' diseases associated with Agent Orange Exposure

Edited by NOSOCALPINOY
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