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fred42

Connecting ground wire.

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fred42

Thanks all for taking the time!! Really appreciated..

Im not sure I can get bare copper number 6..Insulated wire OK to the ground rod/rebar?

Edited by fred42

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Mikala

You are correct, concrete has a lower resistance than most soil.

 

From a past study:

Dry concrete above grade 1-5 M ohms,

Dry concrete on grade 0.2-1 M ohms,

Wet concrete on grade 1-5 k ohms.

 

Herbert G. Ufer invented what is known as a Ufer Ground during WWII. Today the NEC accepts a variant of the Ufer ground we call concrete encased ground electrode. Please refer to NEC Table 110.26(A)(1). Condition 2 — Exposed live parts on one side of the working space and grounded parts on the other side of the working space. Concrete, brick, or tile walls shall be considered as grounded.

 

I read that old Herbert spent years testing his uffer ground theory in the desert were he was doing electrical work. They had just sand 40 feet deep. Ground rods did not work and the deeper they went with the rods, it became so hard they could not drive them into the rock hard bed of the desert floor. So thats when he came up with the concrete encasement. It's always cool and damp and it takes 100 years to cure. Some say its better than a rod in the soil.

 

In places where soil is not available (such as the desert), I'd use a Ufer ground without concern.

 

When we drive grounds for the power plants, it's into the soil that's usually available (not in UAE). Typical readings are less than a few ohms, depending on the moisture content of the soil.

 

 

Edited by Mikala

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Headshot

I made this drawing more than a year ago

 

Thank you. Those drawings are absolutely correct, and they show clearly that all you have to do with a VECO transformer to create a 120/240 volt service is tap the center point with a neutral and run it to the house. The transformers here are exactly the same as transformers I used to install in the US.

Edited by Headshot

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SkyMan
Headshot, on 22 Apr 2014 - 7:09 PM, said:

Thank you. Those drawings are absolutely correct, and they show clearly that all you have to do with a VECO transformer to create a 120/240 volt service is tap the center point with a neutral and run it to the house.

Right, so I get to go play lineman when I get a long enough ladder and I'll have the US version.  No, I don't intend to run 110v appliances.  I just want a real ground.

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Headshot

Right, so I get to go play lineman when I get a long enough ladder and I'll have the US version.  No, I don't intend to run 110v appliances.  I just want a real ground.

 

Better to talk with a local lineman (either VECO or contractor) when you see them out working and get him to do it on the side (for a fee of course). It isn't something that can be done hot, and the only way the secondary side can be killed is to open the cutout switch on the primary side of the transformer. That must be done using a hot stick, which is something you don't have access to. The primary and secondary sides of a transformer aren't that far apart, so you can easily get killed trying to work on the secondary side and accidently contacting something on the primary side.

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SkyMan

Better to talk with a local lineman (either VECO or contractor) when you see them out working and get him to do it on the side (for a fee of course). It isn't something that can be done hot, and the only way the secondary side can be killed is to open the cutout switch on the primary side of the transformer. That must be done using a hot stick, which is something you don't have access to. The primary and secondary sides of a transformer aren't that far apart, so you can easily get killed trying to work on the secondary side and accidently contacting something on the primary side.

I won't be messing with anything hot, just the ground.  And the pole I'll be on doesn't have a transformer.  And of course I always remember mom's rule, "If you can't touch nothin' nice, don't touch nothin' at all.

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Headshot

I won't be messing with anything hot, just the ground.  And the pole I'll be on doesn't have a transformer.  And of course I always remember mom's rule, "If you can't touch nothin' nice, don't touch nothin' at all.

 

Let a lineman do it. It won't cost you much, and I don't want to lose a friend. There is a rule in line work. You always connect the neutral first...and then the hot legs. When you disconnect, you disconnect the hot legs first and then the neutral last. You may not think you are messing with the hot stuff, but indeed you are completing a circuit. You can get killed connecting or disconnecting a ground wire. I have seen it happen (to a phone guy who didn't realize he was messing with the best ground in the area). It really is best to have the transformer dead, so there is no chance of you becoming part of a circuit.

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Brucewayne

Let a lineman do it. It won't cost you much, and I don't want to lose a friend. There is a rule in line work. You always connect the neutral first...and then the hot legs. When you disconnect, you disconnect the hot legs first and then the neutral last. You may not think you are messing with the hot stuff, but indeed you are completing a circuit. You can get killed connecting or disconnecting a ground wire. I have seen it happen (to a phone guy who didn't realize he was messing with the best ground in the area). It really is best to have the transformer dead, so there is no chance of you becoming part of a circuit.

 

This is probably the best single bit of information in this entire thread.

Safety first!

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loy

From what i read, different areas of the Ph. uses different power wiring systems. Here in North Luzon they have a 220 VAC. supply with the two wire system. Like the circuit shown for the CEBECO drawing. No third wire. Just a Hot and a neutral which is wired to ground like the drawing shows. I do not think that is safe.

When we did our house i had the electrician wire all the power outlets using the three wire system. Black (hot) White (neutral) Green ground. Had them sank a special grounding rod which was about 12 ft. deep. Have separate grounding buss in the breaker box. All outlets are wired to ground. Used the universal outlets.

We use GFI. outlets in the bath rooms and also for the kitchen circuits.

Here we do have frequent brown outs. Sometimes the supply voltage would dip to 180 VAC. Should be 220 VAC. We purchased our own 25 KVA line transformer from the power company.  The power company should provide the correct voltage. Try and explain that to them. 

At least now we have a steady 230 VAC. constant supply with less chance of voltage surges. Just have to watch the transformer and make sure no one else is hooked up to my transformer. 

In Florida i notice that all the houses have it's own power transformer supplying house power.

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