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My kid needs US constitution requirment, how to get it?


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4thDan

 

I graduated from college in 76 with a 4 yr degree, and in 97 with two masters degrees and had never had to take a US Constitution course, or test.

 

I just did a quick search that may reveal why. http://go.sdsu.edu/education/ste/apply_credential_exit_requirements.aspx

 

Exit Requirements: While not admission requirements, the following must be satisfied prior to obtaining a California Preliminary Teaching Credential. Candidates who have not satisfied these requirements must take the appropriate coursework or examination while completing the teacher credential program.

 

1. Passing the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT): This is a performance exercise that you will be working on throughout our program. You will be required to receive a passing score on all parts of this assessment to be eligible for a California credential.

 

2. Passing Score on RICA (Reading Instruction Competence Assessment): This test is taken during the program after your Reading Methods course. MULTIPLE subject candidates only.

 

3. U.S. Constitution: All credential candidates are required to verify completion of a collegiate-level course or examination covering the principles and provisions of the United States Constitution. If you are a California State University (CSU) graduate, you have automatically met this requirement. Typically this requirement is satisfied by a general education course covering the colonial period of American history (through 1820) or a course covering American government and politics. A grade of credit, “C” or better must be earned. The U.S. Constitution requirement for credentialing purposes may be different from the graduation requirement for the bachelor’s degree. Contact the School of Teacher Education with questions about other courses.

 

The General Education requirements are designed to take care of this EXIT requirement.

 

let's see  we all know what a BS is (toro poo poo for the spanish affiliates)...then MS...hmmm More of the Same....then PhD...Piled Higher and Deeper....

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wacobay

It is if you are a U.S. student with a foreign diploma who attended a school that didn't teach or test you on the U.S. Constitution.

:beatdeadhorse:

We just enrolled our son this year in a community college here in Texas. He graduated from high school in Leyte. The only test he was required to take were tests in reading, writing and math. No tests on the U.S. Constitution were required. Of course this was a community college. In Texas, no specific course on the U.S.Constitution is required, though a course on government is required in the senior year. Since I taught this course for many years I consider it extremely important. :angel: Thanks for reading.

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ed villas

 

 

So my daughter just graduated high school here

 

so many answers,, yet nothing seems "solid" or concrete" :banghead:

HAS anyone considered asking

 

1. INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL MANILA or BRENT . :as-if:

 

they can help or provide some of the answers that we may need on our child's eduction/

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Majorsco

We just enrolled our son this year in a community college here in Texas. He graduated from high school in Leyte. The only test he was required to take were tests in reading, writing and math. No tests on the U.S. Constitution were required. Of course this was a community college. In Texas, no specific course on the U.S.Constitution is required, though a course on government is required in the senior year. Since I taught this course for many years I consider it extremely important. :angel: Thanks for reading.

I did the same three tests when I went to college years Ge. They were designed to determine which math, English and writing courses to be enrolled. For me I tested out if the basic math course and was placed in upper level bases on these tests.

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4thDan

We just enrolled our son this year in a community college here in Texas. He graduated from high school in Leyte. The only test he was required to take were tests in reading, writing and math. No tests on the U.S. Constitution were required. Of course this was a community college. In Texas, no specific course on the U.S.Constitution is required, though a course on government is required in the senior year. Since I taught this course for many years I consider it extremely important. :angel: Thanks for reading.

I totally agree....without at least a basic knowledge of ones rights and the basis of how the US is supposed to operate, the average citizen has no idea when he/she is being wronged.

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