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My kid needs US constitution requirment, how to get it?


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State Trooper

So my daughter just graduated high school here. I want her to take 2 years of USA online college classes before going back to the States. But how can she get the US constituion requirement to satisfy the college entry requirements for a US college? Anyone dealt with this before?

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Majorsco

I've never heard of this requirement.  Foreign students attending US colleges wouldn't need it, why would your daughter?

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Brucewayne

There are online schools in the states and they offer all subjects that are offered to the regular classrooms.

Florida public school system was rated the best in 2013, but I am not sure who won out at the end of this school year.

I think they also have a summer school program, but am not sure.

Here is a good place to start and it isn't the only choice, but it does allow 18 or over students to learn as adults online.

I found some public schools in my search as well, but thought I would just give you a good starting point first.

http://www.state.gov/m/dghr/flo/c21947.htm


I've never heard of this requirement.  Foreign students attending US colleges wouldn't need it, why would your daughter?

 

Back when my older daughters went to high school, the U.S. Constitution test was required and American History was as well before they could graduate.

It was that way in '72 when I graduated as well.

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Majorsco

 

 

Back when my older daughters went to high school, the U.S. Constitution test was required and American History was as well before they could graduate. It was that way in '72 when I graduated as well.

 

I can understand the requirement for a US High School, but not for a US college.  What college requires a US Constitution test or American History course to enter a US College?  The OP was asking about college, not high school.

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cebubird

I can remember someone who lived here(now dead)whose children with CRBAs had to do/learn something before being admitted to US college.

Not that anything related to government makes any sense, but to me, at least, it would make sense for a US citizen who had all schooling in a foreign country, to know something about the country he is citizen of.

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Majorsco

I graduated from college in 76 with a 4 yr degree, and in 97 with two masters degrees and had never had to take a US Constitution course, or test.

 

I just did a quick search that may reveal why. http://go.sdsu.edu/education/ste/apply_credential_exit_requirements.aspx

 

Exit Requirements: While not admission requirements, the following must be satisfied prior to obtaining a California Preliminary Teaching Credential. Candidates who have not satisfied these requirements must take the appropriate coursework or examination while completing the teacher credential program.

1. Passing the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT): This is a performance exercise that you will be working on throughout our program. You will be required to receive a passing score on all parts of this assessment to be eligible for a California credential.

2. Passing Score on RICA (Reading Instruction Competence Assessment): This test is taken during the program after your Reading Methods course. MULTIPLE subject candidates only.

3. U.S. Constitution: All credential candidates are required to verify completion of a collegiate-level course or examination covering the principles and provisions of the United States Constitution. If you are a California State University (CSU) graduate, you have automatically met this requirement. Typically this requirement is satisfied by a general education course covering the colonial period of American history (through 1820) or a course covering American government and politics. A grade of credit, “C” or better must be earned. The U.S. Constitution requirement for credentialing purposes may be different from the graduation requirement for the bachelor’s degree. Contact the School of Teacher Education with questions about other courses.

 

The General Education requirements are designed to take care of this EXIT requirement.

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Brucewayne

I can understand the requirement for a US High School, but not for a US college.  What college requires a US Constitution test or American History course to enter a US College?  The OP was asking about college, not high school.

 

The child went to high school in the Philippines as far as I can tell and they don't teach American History.

All accredited U.S. colleges require a passing grade on the high school U.S. Constitution test along with a high school diploma, at least if the student is a U.S. citizen.

Otherwise, their H.S. diploma is worthless in the U.S. in as far as entering a college is concerned.

If the course had been offered here, the child wouldn't need the extra class now.

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Brucewayne

Upon looking, I find that the test is a requirement for grade school graduation and high school graduation in Illinois and Missouri, so I don't know about other states.

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Majorsco

 

 

All accredited U.S. colleges require a passing grade on the high school U.S. Constitution test along with a high school diploma, at least if the student is a U.S. citizen.

 

By this, you're saying that every foreign student attending any accredited US college would need to have this requirement met. 

 

Hillsdale College for example has only TOEFL as a requirement  beyond what is required for US students. http://www.hillsdale.edu/admissions/apply#International

 

A formal application to Hillsdale College includes:

  • A completed application form. Applicants may apply using the Hillsdale College Online Undergraduate Application, submit The Common Application online, or mail a Hillsdale College Paper Undergraduate Application. Paper applications must be accompanied by a non-refundable fee of $35.00. The application fee is waived for online application methods.

  • Two academic letters of recommendation (no additional recommendation form must accompany these letters), plus optional recommendations/character evaluations not to exceed three total

  • Official high school transcript(s)

  • Official college or university transcript(s) from any institution(s) where academic credit has been granted

  • Official score reports from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (Hillsdale’s SAT code is 1295) or the American College Test (Hillsdale’s ACT code is 2010), or a labeled high school transcript with complete scores

  • A résumé of extracurricular activities, volunteerism, leadership, and work experience

  • Thoughtful essay responses

  • A current photograph used for identification purposes only

 

 

 

International Students

International students must submit all transcripts with English translation and, if applicable, demonstrate proficiency in English by submitting the results of the TOEFL or equivalent test.

 

 

Exit requirements from college, I have found references, but not entrance requirements.


Upon looking, I find that the test is a requirement for grade school graduation and high school graduation in Illinois and Missouri, so I don't know about other states.

 

Yes, and High School Civics, or whatever they call it now, meets that requirement.  So it is not a separate course or exam.

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State Trooper

I should add that she is a US citizen/PHL citizen. She went to kindergarten in the US but we moved here when she was 6 so she did her grade 1 through high school here, now only 16 yrs old.  ---and very anxous to get the hell out of the PHL..

 

From what i can see she needs to have the US constitution requirement to satisy the US high school diploma requirements. Without it she doesnt meet the minimum requirements for entry to a US college.

 

Since she qualifies for a US Pell grant  ($5700) it seems like it would be to my advantage and hers to get her college education from the US. At least the first 2 years to be online and accredited, then the last two years on campus.

 

So if she took an online course, she would still need to take a test..probably a sit down paper and pencil test. That might mean a proxy, such as the US Consulate??

 

ANYWAY...just wondering if anyone ever had this situation before?

 

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Brucewayne

 

 

Yes, and High School Civics, or whatever they call it now, meets that requirement. So it is not a separate course or exam.

 

It is if you are a U.S. student with a foreign diploma who attended a school that didn't teach or test you on the U.S. Constitution.

:beatdeadhorse:

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Brucewayne

 

I graduated from college in 76 with a 4 yr degree, and in 97 with two masters degrees and had never had to take a US Constitution course, or test.

 

I just did a quick search that may reveal why. http://go.sdsu.edu/education/ste/apply_credential_exit_requirements.aspx

 

Exit Requirements: While not admission requirements, the following must be satisfied prior to obtaining a California Preliminary Teaching Credential. Candidates who have not satisfied these requirements must take the appropriate coursework or examination while completing the teacher credential program.

 

1. Passing the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT): This is a performance exercise that you will be working on throughout our program. You will be required to receive a passing score on all parts of this assessment to be eligible for a California credential.

 

2. Passing Score on RICA (Reading Instruction Competence Assessment): This test is taken during the program after your Reading Methods course. MULTIPLE subject candidates only.

 

3. U.S. Constitution: All credential candidates are required to verify completion of a collegiate-level course or examination covering the principles and provisions of the United States Constitution. If you are a California State University (CSU) graduate, you have automatically met this requirement. Typically this requirement is satisfied by a general education course covering the colonial period of American history (through 1820) or a course covering American government and politics. A grade of credit, “C” or better must be earned. The U.S. Constitution requirement for credentialing purposes may be different from the graduation requirement for the bachelor’s degree. Contact the School of Teacher Education with questions about other courses.

 

The General Education requirements are designed to take care of this EXIT requirement.

 

When you were in high school, did you take a Constitution test?

This is the point that the OP made from the beginning and I am trying to make now.

I am finished, sorry, you are on your own as this is wearing too thin for me to continue trying to explain it to you.

 

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Majorsco

Her biggest issue is not whether or not she has a US constitution reqt met to enter college, where there are no such reqts.

 

Her issue is that she graduated high school under a K + 10 system while the rest if the world is K+12. She will have her diploma evaluated against the K+ 12 system and to get a 4 year degree after attending 4 years of college she will need 2 more years to make up the difference under equivalency.

 

I know of someone who Hsd to do 2 years if community college to get the equivalency if a normal high school number if years. That person then went on to get the 4 year degree.

 

Of course that was before online schools existed, so it could now be done online regardless of citizenship.

 

She then could enter college as a foreign student since her residency is PH. She wouldn't be a state resident unless she net the residency rqts for that state and school.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Brucewayne

I should add that she is a US citizen/PHL citizen. She went to kindergarten in the US but we moved here when she was 6 so she did her grade 1 through high school here, now only 16 yrs old.  ---and very anxous to get the hell out of the PHL..

 

From what i can see she needs to have the US constitution requirement to satisy the US high school diploma requirements. Without it she doesnt meet the minimum requirements for entry to a US college.

 

Since she qualifies for a US Pell grant  ($5700) it seems like it would be to my advantage and hers to get her college education from the US. At least the first 2 years to be online and accredited, then the last two years on campus.

 

So if she took an online course, she would still need to take a test..probably a sit down paper and pencil test. That might mean a proxy, such as the US Consulate??

 

ANYWAY...just wondering if anyone ever had this situation before?

 

I left you a link previously and if you read it, it includes the Constitution test that she can take online and it is a government link.

It may be closer to the bottom of the page and there are accredited online schools listed for your convenience.

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