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Debate on Common Core Curriculum


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rainymike

Since the Phils seems to often adopt elements of US education methods, this article may be of interest to parents with kids. I've encountered this exact problem with my kids learning basic arithmetic in school here. Now, I understand that there's a logic to the method, but the method does not seem the most effective. Parents here tend to agree with me, so it's not a foreigner thing.

 

http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/common-core-parent-facebook-post-indiana-school-181841158.html

 

It's part of America's debate on the standardization of education and developing a common core. It's a hot button topic particularly when it gets to science and religion. But I'm of the opinion that curricula should be more localized and less tied to the current 'core' that's the educational flavor of the month.

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Yes, there should be a local component to education.  Totally agree.  However, although I am opposed to the US Common core as it exists today, I agree that there should be education standards in terms

What about doctors?  If the doctor is trained by common core standards, how they get to an answer is more important than saving a life.  Again with a police officer, the process of aiming a gun at a s

Now I understand - this is a program that will be forced on every student for an unspecified time for the benefit of what could be a very small minority.   If it is to benefit a certain segment who

Majorsco

Yes, there should be a local component to education.  Totally agree.  However, although I am opposed to the US Common core as it exists today, I agree that there should be education standards in terms of subjects to be taught in language, math, science, and geography.  History, philosophy, social science, and a local language, in addition to the national language should be local.

 

Much of the bad parts of common core are how it is implemented and how much of a very, very, progressive, left agenda of indoctrination taught in the educational materials presented by common core educators and education companies.  It is not objective and balanced in ANY way.  Even math problems are couched in the progressive agenda.  Just look at word problems and it is obvious.  Couldn't they come up with word problems that are not from any agenda?  Sure they can.

 

Even the SAT exams are full of progressive agenda's in the way questions are written.  Of particular offense are the subjects for the essay questions.  Students who take the exams must lie to themselves what they are writing about to meet the progressive agenda if they want a good score.  If they are honest, they will be marked down.

 

I have a Masters Degree in education, and it is very possible to create learning objectives and educational content that teaches the concepts that need to be taught without any political agenda coming out.  It is possible, but common core advocates are more interested in the indoctrination, then they are with education.

 

Common Core originally had good intentions, but has been taken over by the progressives, so there is little chance of a good education using it.  I see the same problem here in the Philippines, in that progressives are taking over.  I look at the books my children use in their school and it is full of progressive indoctrination, from the Philippine perspective. 

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lamoe

The state of Indiana has rejected Common Cold (Core)

 

The quoted letter from the father misused the point of the question - it wasn't to find the right answer (that never matters to a progressive) it was to point out the right process - which is all they really care about when you think of it.

 

Look like you're doing - don't give a crap if you are.

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SkyMan

The state of Indiana has rejected Common Cold (Core)

 

The quoted letter from the father misused the point of the question - it wasn't to find the right answer (that never matters to a progressive) it was to point out the right process - which is all they really care about when you think of it.

 

Look like you're doing - don't give a crap if you are.

Yeah, I was shared that letter on fb. What a mess eh? Your boss wants answers, right answers, and fast. Not some whacked out method that doesn't produce any accurate answers. Looks like we won't be producing any engineers soon.
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Majorsco

Yeah, I was shared that letter on fb. What a mess eh? Your boss wants answers, right answers, and fast. Not some whacked out method that doesn't produce any accurate answers. Looks like we won't be producing any engineers soon.

 

What about doctors?  If the doctor is trained by common core standards, how they get to an answer is more important than saving a life.  Again with a police officer, the process of aiming a gun at a suspect is more important than where the bullet goes, to a bystander or a criminal.  I wouldn't want a common core trained MD as my doctor, nor being protected by a common core cop.

 

Common core will adversely affect all of society who subscribe to it.

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thebob

The common core number line is a "tool" designed to help students visualize mathematical problems. The exercise in the example is designed to demonstrate that the student understands the concept behind the number line and can identify mistakes in its use.

 

Here is a good description.

 

http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/acre/standards/common-core-tools/organizers/math/number-lines.pdf

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rainymike

Teaching a process is not necessarily bad. For me, the question is whether or not a particular process or method is an effective way of teaching/learning a particular concept.

 

In the case of my kids, the number line and then extended numbers are used for arithmetic. It's my opinion that the method used at our school is more convoluted and confusing than the old fashioned process for teaching addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. I think the problem arose because the kids are getting lost in the process and over-emphasis on that process and losing sight of the original learning objective. 

 

Just my opinion, when that happens, throw out the process and look for another method. While many 'educational' processes and methods may have a sound foundation, actual delivery in the context of the classroom may be altogether different.

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Majorsco

You need to teach process. You can't get the answers without teaching the process to get them. The problem is that teaching the process without achieving the needed accuracy of the result is bad, incomplete teaching/learning. That promotes substandard achievement for the sake if the student feeling good, not learning.

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lamoe

The common core number line is a "tool" designed to help students visualize mathematical problems. The exercise in the example is designed to demonstrate that the student understands the concept behind the number line and can identify mistakes in its use.

 

Here is a good description.

 

http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/acre/standards/common-core-tools/organizers/math/number-lines.pdf

 

 

I agree - but given the results of the many other "new math" processes I have very little faith in it and just about any recent government program.

 

They're not intended for improvement just conforming to a particular mindset. What was so bad about the learning tools that got us to the moon?

 

If little Johnny and Jane can't add it's probably because mommy and daddy (if he's around) don't give a crap about the kids so they receive no encouragement to actually learn how to learn at home so no amount of new methods at school will likely help.

 

I take that back, it may help those who's parents actually care about them so they will be even more qualified for life than those who's don't.

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ROCO22

Common core = Indoctrinate & Dumb-em down... :banghead:

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Aerosick

I tried their "new" math and I see how it works. It was stated that one of the great advantages is for students that can't memorize their "times tables". Well, I memorized them 65+ years ago and I still use them today.

 

Nothing everything in life can be dummied down. Some thing still take hard work...

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thebob

In the case of my kids, the number line and then extended numbers are used for arithmetic. It's my opinion that the method used at our school is more convoluted and confusing than the old fashioned process for teaching addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. I think the problem arose because the kids are getting lost in the process and over-emphasis on that process and losing sight of the original learning objective. 

 

 

The number line is a useful tool a long way beyond addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. It is more difficult because it is preparing students for skills that will be presented later on in their academic career.

 

The learning objective is familiarization with a mathematical tool, not solving basic arithmetic.

 

 

I agree - but given the results of the many other "new math" processes I have very little faith in it and just about any recent government program.   They're not intended for improvement just conforming to a particular mindset. What was so bad about the learning tools that got us to the moon?

 

 

I cannot understand why there needs to be local input to curriculum. The right answers aren't dependent on location, in fact I'd like to see global guidelines. Needless duplication at local levels wastes resources that should be spent on education, not endless bickering by bureaucrats.

 

The learning tools that got us to the moon are inefficient and outdated. The number line is a mental slide rule, that has merit in multiple mathematical disciplines.

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Majorsco

For math no local input is needed. For history, civics/poli sci language a local aspect is vital. Things vary state to state for laws, govt structure, culture, etc.

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rfm010

The number line is a useful tool a long way beyond addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. It is more difficult because it is preparing students for skills that will be presented later on in their academic career.

 

The learning objective is familiarization with a mathematical tool, not solving basic arithmetic...

 

...The learning tools that got us to the moon are inefficient and outdated. The number line is a mental slide rule, that has merit in multiple mathematical disciplines.

 

indeed.  number lines are useful for the concepts of positive and negative numbers, forward and backward direction (story problems!), the idea of positive and negative infinity, graphing, lots of stuff.  math for engineering and science uses concepts and processes that build upon one another.  it isn't enough to simply be able to memorize certain procedures if you are going to go very far with math.  some people just need basics, but if you don't try and teach it to the youngsters they will never have the option later in life to decide if they would like to go farther--it's too late for them.

 

 

 

I cannot understand why there needs to be local input to curriculum. ...

 

you were doing so well until you got to this point...  i don't trust someone from far away (or nearby) to necessarily get things right so i certainly would like local oversight in what is being done in my community.  if the global overseers get things right then the local layer is redundant and wasteful but what if, for example, the global overseers are from texas and design the science curriculum? 

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lamoe

Now I understand - this is a program that will be forced on every student for an unspecified time for the benefit of what could be a very small minority.

 

If it is to benefit a certain segment who need the extra help and it works great. But why not wait until it's needed and apply on an individual basis?

 

It's similar to several instances  I believe where the teacher informed the class they couldn't move on in their studies until everyone had reached the same level. Don't provide extra assistance to those who need it, hold everyone back so they're all equal?

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