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Puerto man

the installation guides of SRC and Eastern Wire for these panels shows them butted together and attached via 4 inch wide wire mesh tied to the adjoining panels.

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It is not completely done (hardscaping and landscaping still ongoing), but here is what the exterior of the house looks like now...          

In this thread, I will attempt to take you through the process of performing a major remodel on my house. When we first purchased the property in 2010, I was looking for potential more than for finish

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Any place where the panels don't contact each other, there is no insulation, and insulation was one of my major considerations when I decided on using them. The gaps you see between panels in the pictures were filled with more foam. The other factor is the steel mesh that covers the panels. That wire mesh is intended to be tied between panels. If you look at the picture I took of the panels up on the walls, you can see some rebar, both vertical and horizontal. The picture is a little deceiving in that after I took the picture, they put up quite a bit more rebar, both vertically and horizontally, so the pictures don't show all of the steel reinforcement that went into the walls. All of the rebar was welded to the steel columns and beams, and tied to the wire mesh using  wire ties.

I never intended the panels to be load bearing (that was what the steel columns and beams were for), so for me they were there to provide insulation in the walls and give us something to adhere the stucco (here known as plaster or render) to. In those terms, the panels functioned very well. The inside and outside surfaces had all been stuccoed when we had the big earthquake in 2015, and there wasn't a single hairline crack in any of my surfaces (even though there were collapsed rendered CHB walls in our barangay). I would say that is a testament to how good the product is in the application that we used it.

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hyaku

I had a friend that did this. The stone headed building inspectors would no pass it. If you are building from scratch best check with them first.

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Puerto man

Headshot did you re-bar re-inforcement equivalent to what is used for CHB?

I got quotes from SRC and eastern wire about 3 weeks ago. They both sell direct, and pricing is based on pick up at their NCR locations. Neither Eastern Wire nor SRC make load bearing panels now. I don't know whether there is an advantage or disadvantage filling the gaps with foam, as opposed to tying them panels directly together with re-inforcing mesh. 

Eastern wire quoted me as follows for 100 sq m: 

the standard thickness of the EVG panel EPS (polystyrene core) is 1½inch. With concrete, this will come out to 4 inches finished wall thickness. We produce this straight to the cut size you need. In your case, you will need the 1.2x3.0M panel.  Each piece is P1730, can be produced in 2-3days after deposit of payment to our account. Once deposited, this will be ready for pickup at our plant in Valenzuela (map attached). EVG-3D Panel, 3inch EPS, 1.2x3.0M = P2270/panel

the walls are non loadbearing, you would just need to apply 30mm concrete on both sides regardless if your EPS Core is 1½inch or 3inches.

40-80mm is for loadbearing walls which we do not manufacture at the moment.

 

SRC quoted is attached

src quote.pdf

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The SRC panels come in 1 1/2", 2", 2 1/2", 3", 3 1/2", and 4" thicknesses. You can order the thickness that will meet your needs. I got 2" panels, but I wish we had used 3 1/2" or 4" panels, so the steel columns and beams would have been flush with the panel surfaces. That way, there would have been more insulation, and the stucco (render) would not have any visible columns (visible columns are common in rendered CHB structures here in the Philippines). BTW, You don't apply concrete to the panels. Concrete has rocks, sand, cement and water  in it, and the stucco (or render) just has sand, cement and water in the mix (no rocks). 

You can apply colorant to the sand/cement mixture to make colored stucco (so you won't have to paint it), but that is not a common practice in the Philippines. The colorant IS available at Wilcon if you choose to go that route. Otherwise, you can do what everybody else in the Philippines does, and just paint over the surface (and then repaint every five years as the surface erodes or gets stained). With the air pollution in the Cebu metro area, I'm not totally convinced that colorized stucco would retain its color any more than paint does. You just wouldn't have to worry about it peeling off in a few years. Colorized stucco might fare much better out away from the city.

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zonie100

Puerto Man, have you checked what shipping costs will do to the total price? I'm curious about how much more this will add to the total price.....

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Puerto man

I didnt check the shipping costs, nor did I attempt to get a better price yet.  I live about a 2 hour RoRo ride from Batangas.

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