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Enuff

looks like LOTS of work painting, any idea how often the railings will need to be repainted?

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Formed Steel Floor Decking

 

When we decided to build a second floor, we wanted to use innovative materials and methods. In reality, everything is in common usage, but not necessarily in this application (single-family house). I have already discussed the heavy steel framing, which is normally seen in high-rise application (even then it is more common in the West than it is here). The same goes for the formed steel floor decking. It is very common in high-rise construction (even in the Philippines). Formed steel decking makes forming and reinforcing concrete flooring easier, and saves weight and concrete without sacrificing strength.

 

First, you lay down the formed decking

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Then the steel rebar goes on top (tied at every intersection). You will notice that we didn't scrimp on steel reinforcing in this project.

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The bottom of the formed steel decking is supported using boards and jacks (mid-span) until the concrete is set (28 days).

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Once the decking is properly supported, Concrete is poured on the surface, leveled and allowed to harden. plumbing and electrical conduit were brought through before the pour

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looks like LOTS of work painting, any idea how often the railings will need to be repainted?

 

You are correct. There is a lot of paint on and in my house. All of the white is high gloss (which supposedly has the longest life expectancy), but only time will tell how long any paint lasts here. All surfaces were well-primed before painting, so we shouldn't have any paint problems due to being applied to concrete. It is unfortunate, but it seems like tinted stucco (that shouldn't ever require painting) is pretty much unheard of here. Maybe it's been tried and didn't work due to mold and mildew that seems to be plentiful here. I know there are chemicals put into paint to deter mold and mildew, but maybe that doesn't work for tinted stucco. If stucco could be made mildew and mold-proof, it would probably be worth putting the colorant into BB boxes and shipping it over, provided you knew the colors you want. It might save a lot of maintenance later. Unfortunately, I didn't ship colorant over because I thought I could find it here. I couldn't, so we used paint...just like everybody else does here.

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A cool home is important to me, and I know that steel roofs and concrete walls by themselves aren't very conducive to a comfortably cool interior. They just conduct and radiate heat too well for that. For that reason, I decided to insulate my home.

 

The walls of the second story have a two-inch layer of insulating foam that is wire reinforced on both sides (wires on both sides are tied together through the foam insulation). The roofing is lined using rolled foil-backed 3/4" foam insulation. The entire surface of the soffit (eave) under the roof is perforated to allow cross-ventilation. Between the roof insulation and the ventilation, it is very comfortable even up in the attic area above the second story ceiling.

 

Here is the sheet insulation the went into the walls...

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These pictures shown the insulation in the walls and lining the roofing...

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Once the foam sheets are installed (supported by rebar welded to the steel beams and columns and woven through the reinforcing wire on the sheets), they are plastered with cement (basically what we call stucco) the same as CHB is coated here. The foam not only insulates the walls of house, it also cuts down on the weight. These are non-loadbearing walls, since the weight of the roof is carried by the steel columns. However, the rebar running vertically and horizontally between the beams and columns also stiffens the entire structure. Here is how it looks when both sides have been plastered with cement...

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Here is how a wall looks after being plastered (the columns haven't been plastered yet)...

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The earthquake and typhoon occurred after the second story walls were finished, so they were exposed to both. There was absolutely no damage to the structure (not even cosmetic damage). That made me smile considering the damage to CHB structures I have seen in the area. It confirmed that we had made good decisions in the material and methods used in this project.

Edited by Headshot

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smokey

looks high tech. for the Philippines .. I also wonder about the colored stucco..  it cant be the heat for sure because its hotter in Arizona then Cebu... must be the water.... This time around at my house I triple  painted ... First I used primer, then versa tex and then a outer coat ..  very thick and took a lot of time but hoping it last longer .. your  place looks very nice

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Enuff

Great. I can read construction updates all day long, through in some pics and I'm like a "slow kid" at chucky cheese.

 

As you know, since you did the final design on my plan, its tiny but I feel just enough. I too have been looking into steel beams instead of concrete columns. my plan is to fly a buddy of mine in for a week and allow him the weld the entire structure (60sqm). These insulated panels will work perfect leaving only the stucco left. I will definitely be asking you for more info on these in the future.

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looks high tech. for the Philippines .. I also wonder about the colored stucco..  it cant be the heat for sure because its hotter in Arizona then Cebu... must be the water.... This time around at my house I triple  painted ... First I used primer, then versa tex and then a outer coat ..  very thick and took a lot of time but hoping it last longer .. your  place looks very nice

 

Thanks. We used the same paint system here. It takes longer to apply by using the three-step process, but hopefully it will last a long, long time. On the colored stucco, I have seen it here, but it certainly isn't common, and I have no idea how long it will hold up here. I know that it is used all over the US in both dry and humid conditions, but mold and mildew are a lot more prevalent in the tropics. More likely, it is because it isn't part of their tradition, and you know how traditions are. They are perpetuated long after anybody remembers why they were established in the first place.

Edited by Headshot

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Great. I can read construction updates all day long, through in some pics and I'm like a "slow kid" at chucky cheese.

 

As you know, since you did the final design on my plan, its tiny but I feel just enough. I too have been looking into steel beams instead of concrete columns. my plan is to fly a buddy of mine in for a week and allow him the weld the entire structure (60sqm). These insulated panels will work perfect leaving only the stucco left. I will definitely be asking you for more info on these in the future.

 

I think your house is perfect for your situation, but I'm sure the same materials and methods I used would work in your house as well. I'll see you this next month, and you can see the final result for yourself. Steel beams and columns are a good way to ensure a strong house.

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nsm1226

Wow. It's really great house. I want to build a house like yours.

And actually I am planning to build a beach house in the near future in biasong, Talisay.

I wonder how much you spent over all.

Can u give the cost you spent?

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Wow. It's really great house. I want to build a house like yours.

And actually I am planning to build a beach house in the near future in biasong, Talisay.

I wonder how much you spent over all.

Can u give the cost you spent?

 

Thanks for the compliment. Once you can PM (30 posts), we can talk about costs. If you were building the house from scratch, the cost factors would be totally different from what they were as a remodel. If I were building the house from scratch, I would have used some of the new materials all over the house. I would have used a lot more steel and a lot less concrete, and I would have used the foam core exterior walls on both floors.

 

We love the balcony above the garage, and have spent a lot of afternoons, sunsets and evenings there. I never realized how glorious the sunsets are here until we started watching them frequently.

 

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Rwtom

Great information; I too appreciate you sharing it.  I am planning to move to RP when (or before) I retire.  I have been debating whether to build a house or renovate.

Russ  

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ahoy53

Really nice looking home.I would like to retire in metro Cebu,but think am getting priced out.

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smokey

If I had a five story house, I would have an elevator too.

 

 

The elevator is for future when stair climbing becomes hard very nice job has lots of curb appeal you took a plain Jane and gave her some nice curves

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This year we're working on the planting plan for the side yard. I have a lot of trees to plant. I put together a planting plan mainly for tree placement (I like a lot of trees). There will be Bougainvillea vines on the walls, and a lot of underplantings under the trees, but they aren't shown in the planting plan. It would be just too complicated. I am planting a few trees each month. You can see I like fruit trees.

 

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There are also three Malunggay trees growing, but  they will never be allowed to get tall enough to call them trees. They will always be part of the understory.

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