Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Headshot

Old House to New House

Recommended Posts

Headshot

One of the parameters the contractor had to work under was that we didn't want all of the interior finish work we had already done in the first floor to be destroyed during construction. To achieve that goal, We gutted the ceilings and some of the roof framing, but left enough to keep the roof on while we installed the steel framework and decking for the second floor, erected steel columns to support the new roof, framed the new roof (steel), and sheathed the new roof. As work was completed on a section of the new roof, the old corresponding section of the old roof was disassembled and scrapped. Some damage was done to finish work in the first floor anyway, but the contractor promised to fix any damage, and he was good to his word. So...here was how work progressed...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Demolition.

 

House before demolition

post-6379-0-03909400-1395923665_thumb.jpg

 

Top of firewall and music room demolished in preparation for steel framing

post-6379-0-03681400-1395923681_thumb.jpg

 

Look at the amount of rebar in the concrete columns and walls. This is what I call "good bones." The original construction was why we were able to build a second story.

post-6379-0-80372500-1395923695_thumb.jpg

 

While the concrete demolition was going on, more workers were tearing into the ceiling and framing inside.

post-6379-0-46661300-1395923709_thumb.jpg

 

Every piece of wood that wasn't essential to keep the roof up was removed.

post-6379-0-56350900-1395923722_thumb.jpg

 

Pile of scrap dimensional lumber. I'm sure this wood was probably used on other jobs or was given to workers for their own use. That was fine with me.

post-6379-0-27901800-1395923740_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skywalker

'Good bones' is one thing, but if the foundations are not right, then adding weight will potentially cause settlement issues later.  

 

But I guess you used a good structural engineer.  I've seen so many houses in SEA that were designed and engineered for one storey, and more have been added (post construction), with the inevitable (often lethal) structural failure.

 

In my own house, despite the fact that we were not adding weight to the structure, I deemed one of the main structural uprights to be less than what I consider good enough,  and had my guys dig out a pit and install another rebar reinforced upright as an added precaution.  Bear in mind I've been building and renovating properties for more than 25 years.

 

I also removed all the timber suspended ceilings and replaced with aluminium, to pre-empt termite issues years down the line.  I'll post some pics when I get more time!

Edited by Skywalker
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

'Good bones' is one thing, but if the foundations are not right, then adding weight will potentially cause settlement issues later.  

 

But I guess you used a good structural engineer.  I've seen so many houses in SEA that were designed and engineered for one storey, and more have been added (post construction), with the inevitable (often lethal) structural failure.

 

Before he started his own construction company, Ben Simbajon headed up the structural engineering team for the SM City Mall. While the mall suffered quite a bit of cosmetic damage inside the department store during the earthquake, there was absolutely no damage to any structural elements. Ben did a good job. On my house, he checked to ensure the foundation was adequate before we started anything else.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Steel Framing

 

All of the steel was delivered to the site during the first week of construction. Notice, this is not lightweight steel.

post-6379-0-66399000-1395931168_thumb.jpg

 

All steel received a coat of red steel primer prior to being installed.

post-6379-0-51724400-1395931188_thumb.jpg

 

Here are steel I-beams that have been installed to support the second floor decking. You will notice that the weight of the I-beams is being supported by steel tubular scaffolding until after the concrete walls are raised to support the bottoms of the beams.

post-6379-0-33294800-1395931201_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-27133500-1395931215_thumb.jpg

 

Scaffolding and more scaffolding. Not only was scaffolding used to support the workers, but it was also used to support winches and elements of the structure temporarily until they could support themselves. Holes were cut through the existing roofing, so the scaffolding could rise right up through the house.

post-6379-0-85645500-1395931230_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-96666000-1395931248_thumb.jpg

 

Once steel elements were welded together, the were touched up with red primer, and then a grey epoxy coat was applied to ensure that they never rust. This was done with all structural steel elements.

 

post-6379-0-25097300-1395931264_thumb.jpg

 

Once the I-beams were in place, round steel columns were welded into place to support the roof framing.

post-6379-0-73897600-1395931277_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-72380200-1395931502_thumb.jpg

 

The roof trusses were framed on-site using steel scaffolding to keep the whole operation level and flat.

post-6379-0-22756300-1395931522_thumb.jpg

 

Then the roof framing was attached to the columns using smaller I-beams, the roof trusses were then attached and stabilized using steel purloins. All connections were welded.

post-6379-0-36378300-1395931537_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-30548900-1395931552_thumb.jpg

 

This shows how the steel I-beams were laid out to support the steel floor decking and concrete for the second floor.

post-6379-0-54782100-1395931565_thumb.jpg

 

This shows the vertical columns supporting the roof framing after the insulation and roofing was applied. Note that part of the roof isn't complete. Ben's purchasing guy miscalculated the amount of roofing needed and they had to order more. The roof sheeting was epoxy coated, and made in Manila, so they had to have more shipped in.

post-6379-0-17242300-1395931582_thumb.jpg

 

This shows the ceiling trusses for the second floor ceiling. They were the last steel framing element to be put in. They are fairly lightweight, since they just support the lightweight steel ceiling framing and sheetrock, but they are still heavy-duty enough the I can walk across them.

post-6379-0-61724300-1395931595_thumb.jpg

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

That was because I chose a buildable lot in the first place. If your lot is fairly flat, you don't need an elevator. If you build on the side of a cliff, then you might...

come on its the challenge of the thing we are looking to remodel ourselves and I really hoping to find a used escalator to give it that finishing touch

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

come on its the challenge of the thing we are looking to remodel ourselves and I really hoping to find a used escalator to give it that finishing touch

 

If I had a five story house, I would have an elevator too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Somebody asked me how we came up with the 265 square meters and are the walls really concrete, so I will answer it here so others will know as well.

 

I will address the size issue first. The first floor is 1723 square feet (that includes the main house, the garage, a storeroom under the balcony stairs and one in the back of the house, and the CR in the back). All are connected and covered by roof. Even though garages aren't included in area in the US, they are here in the Philippines. The second floor is 1126 square feet. That is a total of 2849 square feet for the house. Now, you can question these numbers, but it was my architectural design program (Home Designer Architectural by Chief Architect) that calculated the areas. Using a conversion program ( http://www.metric-co...uare-meters.htm ), it gave me 264.68 square meters. Now, I will admit that I rounded that to 265 square meters, but I see nothing wrong with that.

 

On the walls, there are only two places in the exterior walls where CHB was used. What is now the entry was originally a half-garage. The second owners built it in using CHB creating the entry. The second place was that for some reason, there were two courses of CHB on top of the poured exterior walls. They carried no load, and I believe they did that because they changed the height of the ceiling in the front of the house. I know the rest of the walls are poured because the second owner had holes cut for AC units, and the cuts were through solid concrete (with a concrete saw). That was what I saw when we were first looking at the house that drew me to it. We also changed the locations on a couple of windows, and we had to cut through solid steel reinforced concrete (nowhere near a column).

 

The interior walls...well that's a different story. They are steel reinforced and concrete filled CHB all the way to the top. That was the main reason we used the steel I-beams. They tie the center columns together with the exterior columns and walls. It was either that or pour steel-reinforced beams across the tops of all interior walls. I don't see that as a waste. It ties everything together, and causes the house to act as a single unit. During the earthquake, we didn't even have a single crack in our walls...not even cosmetic. The reports said that 30,000 homes went down or were badly damaged during that earthquake. They were pretty much all CHB-built buildings. CHB here tends to be made with too much sand and aggregate and not nearly enough cement. You can break (shatter) most CHB here just by dropping it from waist-high on a hard surface.

 

We live in an active earthquake zone, and there is nothing that says we won't have an even bigger earthquake in one of the faults that run under the straits, in the mountains or under the city itself. There is no such thing as overbuilding when you live in an active earthquake zone. But then, that's just me. I'm fairly conservative when it comes to building standards. I worked for 15 years as a standards engineer for PacifiCorp in the US, and then worked another 12 years as a quality manager. I designed the house remodel myself, and specified what we used where. I also paid two structural engineers to check the plans and ensure the design was adequate. I like to put new eyes on a project because you sometimes look past things when you are too familiar with the project.

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShawnM

Somebody asked me how we came up with the 265 square meters and are the walls really concrete, so I will answer it here so others will know as well.

 

I will address the size issue first. The first floor is 1723 square feet (that includes the main house, the garage, a storeroom under the balcony stairs and one in the back of the house, and the CR in the back). All are connected and covered by roof. Even though garages aren't included in area in the US, they are here in the Philippines. The second floor is 1126 square feet. That is a total of 2849 square feet for the house. Now, you can question these numbers, but it was my architectural design program (Home Designer Architectural by Chief Architect) that calculated the areas. Using a conversion program ( http://www.metric-co...uare-meters.htm ), it gave me 264.68 square meters. Now, I will admit that I rounded that to 265 square meters, but I see nothing wrong with that.

 

On the walls, there are only two places in the exterior walls where CHB was used. What is now the entry was originally a half-garage. The second owners built it in using CHB creating the entry. The second place was that for some reason, there were two courses of CHB on top of the poured exterior walls. They carried no load, and I believe they did that because they changed the height of the ceiling in the front of the house. I know the rest of the walls are poured because the second owner had holes cut for AC units, and the cuts were through solid concrete (with a concrete saw). That was what I saw when we were first looking at the house that drew me to it. We also changed the locations on a couple of windows, and we had to cut through solid steel reinforced concrete (nowhere near a column).

 

The interior walls...well that's a different story. They are steel reinforced and concrete filled CHB all the way to the top. That was the main reason we used the steel I-beams. They tie the center columns together with the exterior columns and walls. It was either that or pour steel-reinforced beams across the tops of all interior walls. I don't see that as a waste. It ties everything together, and causes the house to act as a single unit. During the earthquake, we didn't even have a single crack in our walls...not even cosmetic. The reports said that 30,000 homes went down or were badly damaged during that earthquake. They were pretty much all CHB-built buildings. CHB here tends to be made with too much sand and aggregate and not nearly enough cement. You can break (shatter) most CHB here just by dropping it from waist-high on a hard surface.

 

We live in an active earthquake zone, and there is nothing that says we won't have an even bigger earthquake in one of the faults the run under the straits, in the mountains or under the city itself. There is no such thing as overbuilding when you live in an active earthquake zone. But then, that's just me. I'm fairly conservative when it comes to building standards. I worked for 15 years as a standards engineer for PacifiCorp in the US, and then worked another 12 years as a quality manager. I designed the house remodel myself, and specified what we used where. I also paid two structural engineers to check the plans and ensure the design was adequate. I like to put new eyes on a project because you sometimes look past things when you are too familiar with the project.

Great Job Sir, looks like a very nice place and have to concur with previous posts about the flooring, absolutely beautiful.

 

Shawn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jess Bartone

...There is no such thing as overbuilding...

 

Absolutely. Looking at the photos, I see no reason you couldn't add another floor. Your house will survive four or five generations, maybe more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kuting

Great opinion on "overbuilding", better to be on the side of caution. Even if it'll cost you a few more bucks, it securing your home and safety of the family is worth every penny. Will keep this thought in mind if and when we are ready to do ours up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hamm

I was asked in a PM who did the work in my house. My contractor is Ben Simbajon of BS Simbajon Construction, Inc. You can find his contact information here...

 

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/topic/59668-building-contractor/#entry748434

 

All of the craftsmen (carpenters, masons, tile layers, painters, electricians, plumbers, etc.) were people who work for him. To the comment that it looks like they know what they're doing...yes, they do, but that doesn't mean you don't still have to watch them if you want anything special or outside of their normal construction methods. Most problems we had along the way were due to breakdowns in communication. It is amazing how many times things need to be redone because they couldn't understand why I wanted things a certain way. They would nod in understanding, and then try to do things the way they were used to. Then that would get torn out, and things would be done the way I wanted. In the end, they understood why we had done things the way we did. The quality is apparent in the final product.

 

 

Shouldn't communication with your subs be your contractor's responsibility?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SkyMan

Shouldn't communication with your subs be your contractor's responsibility?

Even if you communicate directly with workers, they will screw things up.  How much more so if you talk to the contractor and he has to take your instructions to the worker.  You need to have a hands on approach to building here even if you have a contractor. 

 

 

 

In the end, they understood why we had done things the way we did.
I do that frequently with my caretaker, I'll have him do some work that appears to make little or no sense, then some other work.  It's kind of cool when you see his lights come on and he figures out what's going on and why he was doing those seemingly odd things.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

If I had a five story house, I would have an elevator too.

as a side business I was thinking of letting people come over and climb the steps as a work out each trip up will cost 10 peso and the person that can climb the steps bottom to top 30 times in one day will be dork of the year//// your house looks nice ....

Edited by smokey
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

My contractor and I have a good relationship. I was on the jobsite for at least some time almost every day during the project, and if I saw something that was wrong. I contacted him, and I also told the workers to either stop or I gave them instructions as to how I wanted a thing done. Luckily the site foreman understood English fairly well, so we discovered and corrected most problems before they became serious. Most of the problems came about because somebody guessed how I wanted things rather than asking. Their guesses were almost always wrong. Having a contractor means you have somebody to organize the work and ensure that workers and materials are on-site when they are needed. If you totally let a contractor make all of the decisions (even in the US) things will NOT turn out as you envisioned. A hand's on approach is the only way you will see the project result match your intent. Even if you explained every little detail in the beginning, some details would still be forgotten or modified. It's just human nature.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

The Garage and Balcony

 

Since the garage and balcony were such big parts of this project, I thought I would include how things progressed from start to finish.

 

First, they laid out the footings for the columns and dug the holes.

post-6379-0-15289400-1396069991_thumb.jpg

 

Then, they poured the footings. This one was still being poured, so the rebar in the footing is in the concrete.

post-6379-0-13247100-1396070005_thumb.jpg

 

Once the columns were poured, it was time to form up the steel-reinforced beams.

post-6379-0-63446800-1396070016_thumb.jpg

 

Here the beams are forms and the formed steel decking has been laid awaiting steel reinforcing and concrete.

post-6379-0-03989200-1396070027_thumb.jpg

 

Here, the balcony slab and beams have been poured (single pour for additional strength.

post-6379-0-86921600-1396070037_thumb.jpg

 

Formed for the garage arches

post-6379-0-40758000-1396070564_thumb.jpg

 

Concrete structural work completed

post-6379-0-91321500-1396070574_thumb.jpg

 

Lightweight steel framing for garage ceiling

post-6379-0-10220300-1396070585_thumb.jpg

 

Ballisters for balcony and garage

post-6379-0-76188900-1396070591_thumb.jpg

 

Ballisters being installed around balcony

post-6379-0-61245500-1396070598_thumb.jpg

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

The Garage and Balcony (continued)

 

Since the garage and balcony were such big parts of this project, I thought I would include how things progressed from start to finish.

 

Finishing the railings

post-6379-0-26770500-1396071293_thumb.jpg

 

Ballisters and railings complete around balcony and garage

post-6379-0-44409300-1396071300_thumb.jpg

 

Handcrafting the railings for the stairs

post-6379-0-13178000-1396071308_thumb.jpg

 

Cement capitol moldings applied to columns and walls

post-6379-0-90443600-1396071316_thumb.jpg

 

The finished garage with the gate

post-6379-0-72339200-1396071324_thumb.jpg

 

Taken from the neighbor's balcony (across the street)

post-6379-0-96244900-1396071332_thumb.jpg

 

The balcony from the family room door. Along with the family room, this is our party place.

post-6379-0-54074300-1396071339_thumb.jpg

 

The balcony looking toward the back of the house (that is a motocross track in the background, but it is seldom dry enough to use)

post-6379-0-03750800-1396071346_thumb.jpg

 

The balcony and garage taken from the back balcony (under the water tower). This shows the stairs before the storage room was built under the stairs.

post-6379-0-54916800-1396071353_thumb.jpg

 

The balcony and garage (along with the side of the house) taken from the back corner of the yard. This shows the wall of the storage room under the stairs, but it wasn't yet painted. The door into the room is on the house side.

post-6379-0-50779200-1396071360_thumb.jpg

Edited by Headshot
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

NICE GARAGE but looks kind of sad the only customer is an old truck.... oh I know new chevy trailblazer in red for him and Kia Soul for her to get that grocery shopping done and lots of room for them trips to S/R

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Enuff

beautiful work HeadShot, simply beautiful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

NICE GARAGE but looks kind of sad the only customer is an old truck.... oh I know new chevy trailblazer in red for him and Kia Soul for her to get that grocery shopping done and lots of room for them trips to S/R

 

I know, but a new vehicle just isn't in the cards right now (unless we win the lottery). Actually, my wife has been bugging me to get a new (or newer) SUV because the truck has been having some "issues" lately. I was originally planning to get a rib boat (for diving) and park it in the garage (on a trailer) along with the truck, but it doesn't look like that will happen. However, you can see that even with two full-sized vehicles, it would still be roomy.

Edited by Headshot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Enuff

looks like LOTS of work painting, any idea how often the railings will need to be repainted?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

Formed Steel Floor Decking

 

When we decided to build a second floor, we wanted to use innovative materials and methods. In reality, everything is in common usage, but not necessarily in this application (single-family house). I have already discussed the heavy steel framing, which is normally seen in high-rise application (even then it is more common in the West than it is here). The same goes for the formed steel floor decking. It is very common in high-rise construction (even in the Philippines). Formed steel decking makes forming and reinforcing concrete flooring easier, and saves weight and concrete without sacrificing strength.

 

First, you lay down the formed decking

post-6379-0-41775800-1396090513_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-72942100-1396090522_thumb.jpg

 

Then the steel rebar goes on top (tied at every intersection). You will notice that we didn't scrimp on steel reinforcing in this project.

post-6379-0-29864300-1396090529_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-20649600-1396090539_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-50161800-1396090549_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-28954800-1396090560_thumb.jpg

 

The bottom of the formed steel decking is supported using boards and jacks (mid-span) until the concrete is set (28 days).

post-6379-0-39791100-1396090566_thumb.jpg

 

Once the decking is properly supported, Concrete is poured on the surface, leveled and allowed to harden. plumbing and electrical conduit were brought through before the pour

post-6379-0-24495100-1396090575_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

looks like LOTS of work painting, any idea how often the railings will need to be repainted?

 

You are correct. There is a lot of paint on and in my house. All of the white is high gloss (which supposedly has the longest life expectancy), but only time will tell how long any paint lasts here. All surfaces were well-primed before painting, so we shouldn't have any paint problems due to being applied to concrete. It is unfortunate, but it seems like tinted stucco (that shouldn't ever require painting) is pretty much unheard of here. Maybe it's been tried and didn't work due to mold and mildew that seems to be plentiful here. I know there are chemicals put into paint to deter mold and mildew, but maybe that doesn't work for tinted stucco. If stucco could be made mildew and mold-proof, it would probably be worth putting the colorant into BB boxes and shipping it over, provided you knew the colors you want. It might save a lot of maintenance later. Unfortunately, I didn't ship colorant over because I thought I could find it here. I couldn't, so we used paint...just like everybody else does here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Headshot

A cool home is important to me, and I know that steel roofs and concrete walls by themselves aren't very conducive to a comfortably cool interior. They just conduct and radiate heat too well for that. For that reason, I decided to insulate my home.

 

The walls of the second story have a two-inch layer of insulating foam that is wire reinforced on both sides (wires on both sides are tied together through the foam insulation). The roofing is lined using rolled foil-backed 3/4" foam insulation. The entire surface of the soffit (eave) under the roof is perforated to allow cross-ventilation. Between the roof insulation and the ventilation, it is very comfortable even up in the attic area above the second story ceiling.

 

Here is the sheet insulation the went into the walls...

post-6379-0-97433300-1396099649_thumb.jpg

 

These pictures shown the insulation in the walls and lining the roofing...

post-6379-0-65851500-1396099657_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-59211400-1396099663_thumb.jpg

post-6379-0-45142000-1396099670_thumb.jpg

 

Once the foam sheets are installed (supported by rebar welded to the steel beams and columns and woven through the reinforcing wire on the sheets), they are plastered with cement (basically what we call stucco) the same as CHB is coated here. The foam not only insulates the walls of house, it also cuts down on the weight. These are non-loadbearing walls, since the weight of the roof is carried by the steel columns. However, the rebar running vertically and horizontally between the beams and columns also stiffens the entire structure. Here is how it looks when both sides have been plastered with cement...

post-6379-0-75104600-1396099675_thumb.jpg

 

Here is how a wall looks after being plastered (the columns haven't been plastered yet)...

post-6379-0-40032200-1396101820_thumb.jpg

 

The earthquake and typhoon occurred after the second story walls were finished, so they were exposed to both. There was absolutely no damage to the structure (not even cosmetic damage). That made me smile considering the damage to CHB structures I have seen in the area. It confirmed that we had made good decisions in the material and methods used in this project.

Edited by Headshot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smokey

looks high tech. for the Philippines .. I also wonder about the colored stucco..  it cant be the heat for sure because its hotter in Arizona then Cebu... must be the water.... This time around at my house I triple  painted ... First I used primer, then versa tex and then a outer coat ..  very thick and took a lot of time but hoping it last longer .. your  place looks very nice

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Sailfish Bay Fishing Charters

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..