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Here's a recent example. Find a decent pension room for 500 per night. We pay for a night and get a receipt that morning. Checkout of the other place we were staying at round noon and show up at the lobby with our bags ready to move in. Receptionist says she made a "mistake" and the room wasn't 500 but 600 per night. Maybe so but I stayed in the same room just a few months before for 500 a night for 2 weeks so I know the price and disputed it.

the exact same thing happened to me in Toledo. Looked over a room, they wanted 1000, I told them it wasn't worth 1000 - which it wasn't - and said I'll give you 800 for it, to stay 3 nights. It was a totally straightforward negotiation and no question of any miscommunication or language barrier or anything like that. But when i checked out, I found that they had billed me for 1000 per night for the room together with other add ons, like drinks, pot noodles, etc.

 

the solution was pretty simple. I just laughed, told them to go feck themselves and try it on with somebody else and not me, forked out 600 pesos less than what they were trying to scam off me, got on the motorcycle, and pissed off.

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We ordered  some glass windows for our house gave the kid 15,000 peso's about 50% said he had to buy the glass ok next day he show's up  our house said he rolled his truck all the glass broken ,turn'

This scenario continues to present itself in my life here: foreigner agrees to pay a price for a good or service. Once price is agreed to money is paid in full. Filipino holds the money but before the

altho slightly different from the OP's theme, in our line of work we go thru this all the time. it's not often dealers but usually the private sellers who try to pull this crap.   when a person meet

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Monsoon

I haven't had too much of people trying to change the deal here  on a big scale. The Chinese are famous for this. Every business deal I ever did in China was a moving target. What Filipinos do on a regular basis that drives me mad is trying to give you a bill from the past. Don't present me with a bill 'from last time' that you were too incompetent to give me when I was there. I have had this happen several times, even at major international chain restaurants, and I tell them to get stuffed. One time was at Hard Rock - I was a regular there when I lived nearby, I walk in after being out of town for a week and one of the bartenders tries telling me I owe for 3 beers from my friend last time. When I ask for the bill and you don't include everything and I pay and leave, that transaction is over. Don't try bringing shit up days or weeks later! 

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charlest27

It is real simple here , i get told a price thats is it for me unless it is too mush . When i first got here i went to buy corn , the nice lady said 55 pesos a kilo o.k i will get 2 Kilos, total 110 pesos . Up out of nowhere a man says something, the lady says that will be 150 pesos. I ask is that for 2 kilos yes said the lady. I said i was told 55 pesos a kilo . She said sorry sir 150. I said no thank you on the corn and walked away. Next day i went to the same lady i said 55 pesos a kilo for corn she said yes , i got my corn and was happy she asked why did you not buy corn before, easy i said if i tell you 55 pesos a kilo and then i change the price to 75 peso a kilo would you buy from me. She said no what do you think of me. That is right now what do you think of me? Then i said were are the same we are no fools.

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Brucewayne

cdo   is it cash on delevirey

Yes.

No deposits, if they don't have operating capitol to order without cash up front, they could possibly take the money and spend it instead of ordering or providing the goods/service.

Insolvency is awful, but it is even worse when it falls back on the customer.

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oscarpears

I know there are principles at stake and an agreement between gentlemen should be binding. But I do think some Westerners can be too rigid about things that can in the light of day be just petty.
I witnessed recently a foreigner arguing with a taxi driver. The Taxi driver had followed him into the lobby of this rather plush hotel. The driver was adamant that he was underpaid by 50 pesos, the American refused to budge. I found the scene uncomfortable and walked away.
I wanted to tell the American that 50 pesos is not 50 dollars and the Taxi driver seemed to be very certain that he had been under-paid.
In my position, I'd pay the 50 pesos with good grace. 

In the Philippines, it is best to be aware at all times like checking your change in shops and go gently with the flow of Philippine life, saving your powder for more serious battles.

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The other day I was looking at some sun glasses at a street vender.     I was standing on the edge of the side walk when I asked her how much,   She said 80 pesos. I was checking them over thinking to my self this is a pretty good deal when all of a sudden I lost my balance and fell backwards just catching my self.      When the lady saw this she said 70 pesos (she thought I was leaving).     So I took another step backwards and she said 60 pesos, I said sold and bought 5 pair.        See it can work both ways

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80 pesos is a price price to pay for normal sunglasses. The cheapest I have ever seen anywhere in the Philippines was 28 pesos in iligan city, where I bought two pairs. They can often be less than 50. Even in Fuente Osmena, if you pull up on a motorbike the vendors there will accept 50.

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easy44

Yes.

No deposits, if they don't have operating capitol to order without cash up front, they could possibly take the money and spend it instead of ordering or providing the goods/service.

Insolvency is awful, but it is even worse when it falls back on the customer.

 

In theory that's a good idea, but I have found that unless you're dealing with a large company, very few contractors here have enough money to buy materials up front. 

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Brucewayne

Easy, you are right to a certain degree, but don't give them cash, just buy any materials and rent any needed equipment to do the job.

I paid a local P600 to take a radiator to a shop to have it patched and when he came back, it was clean, but still had the hole in it.

I took it to a nearby repair shop to have the job done again and the guy remembered the radiator.

He told me that the fellow who brought it in only wanted a P100 clean up job and was claiming he would repair the unit himself.

I don't trust anyone for a minute with cash, sorry.

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Headshot

I guess it's all about knowing WHO you are dealing with BEFORE you deal with them. If you don't do you homework up front, and KNOW that you are dealing with honest people, then you WILL get badly surprised, and you won't be happy with the results. I got several recommendations from people I already knew before I chose my contractor. Most of the good recommendations pointed to one contractor.

 

I pay part up front and the rest on completion. It is ridiculous to think that a contractor will (or even can) front the entire cost and wait until the project is complete before any payment is made. For a big project like we had this last year, we broke the payments up into four parts, but the final payment still didn't come due until the project was complete to my satisfaction. Everything must be finished and right before final payment is made.

 

Now, to be fair, there are always surprises, but I have found that most surprises come from communication problems. Even though English is spoken here, Filipinos are still not comfortable with it. I have learned that I have to detail every little thing that I expect when the project is complete. Then, go through the project thoroughly together before you both sign the detailed scope of work (all priced out). That cuts down on misunderstandings later.

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hyaku

I don't mind paying as long as they don't 'make up' the price. Buying fruit the other day at 80. The partner told the woman in Visaya to charge me 100!

 

I try to use the same vendors all the time.

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 The partner told the woman in Visaya to charge me 100!

 

 

that happened to me too, once in Thailand. This girl I was with demonstrated that she considered it OK for all Thais, to overcharge foreigners. It wasn't somebody they were related to, or a friend, or anything like that which I might have excused - just a random vendor, she had never even seen before. She demonstrated that as far as she was concerned, it was OK for just any Thai, to overcharge foreigners. The attitude being, hey this is good, there is this foreigner here, this is good let's all of us Thais have a party at their expense.

 

it was at Chattuchak. She got dumped right there. I looked at her levelly for a few seconds, then disappeared into the crowded Bangkok market and straight to the MRT station and away. That was the last time I ever saw her. As soon as they show they are like that they are a total lost cause, and irredeemable.

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sugbu777

I guess it's all about knowing WHO you are dealing with BEFORE you deal with them. If you don't do you homework up front, and KNOW that you are dealing with honest people, then you WILL get badly surprised, and you won't be happy with the results. I got several recommendations from people I already knew before I chose my contractor. Most of the good recommendations pointed to one contractor.

 

I pay part up front and the rest on completion. It is ridiculous to think that a contractor can (or even will) front the entire cost and wait until the project is complete before any payment is made. For a big project like we had this last year, we broke the payments up into four parts, but the final payment still didn't come due until the project was complete to my satisfaction. Everything must be finished and right before final payment is made.

 

Now, to be fair, there are always surprises, but I have found that most surprises come from communication problems. Even though English is spoken here, Filipinos are still not comfortable with it. I have learned that I have to detail every little thing that I expect when the project is complete. Then, go through the project thoroughly together before you both sign the detailed scope of work (all priced out). That cuts down on misunderstandings later.

That's the same way we have done all of our construction projects in the Philippines. The contractor has laborers to pay etc. He needs to be paid something during the project in order to take of his workers etc. It's worked very well for us.

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jtmwatchbiz

altho slightly different from the OP's theme, in our line of work we go thru this all the time. it's not often dealers but usually the private sellers who try to pull this crap.

 

when a person meets up with us to sell their watch(es) the first rule of thumb we have is never give a free education. we limit our discussion to "how much do you want for your watch?" this conversation usually degenerates into "i have no idea" or "you sir", which of course 9 out of 10 times is baloney. at all times we are very careful not to answer any questions about the person's watch like "is it original?", "what model is it?" or "what do you usually pay for one like this?" as there is a good chance they are on a fishing trip and just trying to get a feel for what they have and no intention to make a deal right now. if they are adamant about refusing to name a price and the watch is indeed valuable then one of the crew (not me) will throw out a silly offer of 1000 to 5000p just to see the reaction. when they say no, then the crew members will go back and forth with them and say "what number will make you say yes?". it's this excruciating jousting match that makes buying here especially annoying, but if done correctly can net some good deals. this is also the point where we can establish whether the seller is indeed intending to sell their watch now, or just looking for free info. if the seller completely refuses to talk sensibly about prices then we just conclude the discussion at that point and leave, telling them to contact us when they have their price in mind and are prepared to make a deal. it's quite easy to see when a seller is just fishing for a free education with no intention to sell immediately, and we have learned the hard way not to divulge much info. never inform or educate a seller as to what they have, for if it's not sold right then, there's a slim chance they will be back.   

 

the final step in making deals for us is in line with the OP's theme of seller changing their minds, or at least pretending to. when the price negotiating is getting close and a deal looks imminent, one of us will count out the cash while another crew member, usually our watch tech "jonny ong" is still holding and examining the watch. when the seller agrees to sell at the price negotiated, we slide over the cash for him/her to pick up in their hands and accept. at that point we are in control of the sale and have multiple witnesses among our crew that the transaction is legit and we paid the seller's agreed price. we also present the seller with one of our printed receipts to sign, but even without the receipt the transaction is legit and will stand up if disputed. this dispute can happen within 30 seconds or days/weeks as we have seen it all.

 

cell phones are our worst enemy during deals and many times we ask the seller to please turn off their phone and we will do the same to ours during the deal. we have actually had sellers receive a phone call or text from a competing buyer right after accepting our cash and still sitting with us at a table, and try to weasel out of the sale. we also get some people texting or calling days and sometimes weeks later asking us to return "their" watch. inevitably many people here fail to realize once sold an item no longer belongs to them, and think they are entitled to simply "reverse" a deal on a whim if there happens to be a benefit to them in doing so.

 

this stuff may sound like an extreme of the OP's subject matter but when in the business of buying and selling it's important to be wary of how extreme things can get when dealing with locals who don't understand the basic concepts of agreements and transactions.  

 

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