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Paul

Piping in a submersible pump

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Paul

No I haven't Paul, but the pressure is better than from local utility, except late at night anyway.

 

Here in Cambodia, the water pressure goes up and down like a yo-yo. For x number of hours per day (choose any number between 1 and 12), the water can be completely off. We have a cistern that will hold about 1,000 liters. I have been thinking of installing a check valve in the city water line on this side of the meter, and then piping in a submersible pump and dropping it in the cistern, located in the bathroom. Plug it in and it will pressurize our faucets, without any going back into the city water mains. Well, sounds like it would work anyway. 

 

At least we would have water here to use during the cuts in service. 

 

It's funny. Run solar and rainwater harvesting at the farm. Now, we don't have to concern ourselves with no service out there. But, here in the city, it's a gamble to see if we have power or water, quite often. :) 

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cebubird

We have the check valve installed same way, and really don't know if water is coming from tank or from utility, cause when pressure is really low, water comes from tank.

Seems like your pump idea might work,

 

perfect example-right now I turned on outdoor faucet that is before check valve-0 water pressure-inside-out back-fine-coming from tank.

Edited by cebubird
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lopburi3

Here in Cambodia, the water pressure goes up and down like a yo-yo. For x number of hours per day (choose any number between 1 and 12), the water can be completely off. We have a cistern that will hold about 1,000 liters. I have been thinking of installing a check valve in the city water line on this side of the meter, and then piping in a submersible pump and dropping it in the cistern, located in the bathroom. Plug it in and it will pressurize our faucets, without any going back into the city water mains. Well, sounds like it would work anyway. 

 

At least we would have water here to use during the cuts in service. 

 

It's funny. Run solar and rainwater harvesting at the farm. Now, we don't have to concern ourselves with no service out there. But, here in the city, it's a gamble to see if we have power or water, quite often. :)

Believe you would be better served with a cheap air cooled shallow well pump as most people here in Bangkok use to increase water pressure from either a storage tank or cistern.  But most people do not even bother with a check valve and just feed storage from public as never good pressure and use pump for home water supply full time.  Although if water is OK at times no reason you can not use the check valve.  In either case you do want at least a control tap to allow use of public water in case of pump/electric outage.

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Paul

Believe you would be better served with a cheap air cooled shallow well pump as most people here in Bangkok use to increase water pressure from either a storage tank or cistern.  But most people do not even bother with a check valve and just feed storage from public as never good pressure and use pump for home water supply full time.  Although if water is OK at times no reason you can not use the check valve.  In either case you do want at least a control tap to allow use of public water in case of pump/electric outage.

 

Here at the apartment is where we have the water issue. I don't want to put much money into a place that will never be ours. If I drop a submersible into the cistern in the bathroom, and with valve on this side of the meter to prevent it from going back into the city water system, we can keep the kitchen sink and bathroom supplied with no worries between low pressure. Of course, we have to remember to fill the cistern.

 

If I piped it the way you are suggesting, I would need to have an outside storage tank and pipe it into the water line, followed by the pump. (I am assuming that is what you are saying?) I did think of doing that. But, they wanted too much for the pump. I think, tank and pump together, they wanted $250 USD. I should be able to buy a submersible to provide enough pressure for a shower, for much less than that - I hope, anyway.

 

Just gotta do one thing at a time. as we suffer from the same disease that affects a lot of people - lack-a-funds-itis. Right now, we try to schedule showers (and other business) during times we (think) we will have good pressure. At the moments, that is from about midnight / 1am, to about 4am, local time.

 

When thinking of Bill's storage tank, and with a baby involved, I knew it was better to go a bit more, just to have that extra bit of insurance.

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lopburi3

No reason you can not pull from bath cistern to feed a pump with exit into house water pipes - that would save cost of a tank but looks like the cheapest such pump would be about 4,000 baht here in Thailand.  Another cheap option might be a water heater to pull as some of them do have small pumps included and with luck you could extend hose to fill a sink if mounted near it. 

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Paul

No reason you can not pull from bath cistern to feed a pump with exit into house water pipes - that would save cost of a tank but looks like the cheapest such pump would be about 4,000 baht here in Thailand.  Another cheap option might be a water heater to pull as some of them do have small pumps included and with luck you could extend hose to fill a sink if mounted near it. 

 

Figured I would split this from the other topic.

 

Probably about the same price for one of those pumps, here in Cambodia. Not sure. I will have to go back and ask the boss to verify the price the plumbing supply wanted for that pump. But, it was one of those Mitsubishi pumps that sits on the little tank. Yellow, I think? Certainly one that would need to be kept out of the weather. 

 

No sink in the bath, only a toilet (not a self flush) and a shower with a water heater. The kitchen sink is about two meters from the water heater / shower.

 

This is what was in my mind at the time:- The cistern has a water line piped right to the top of it. I even considered adding a float to fill it, as they are only about $10 USD, here. Then, I would never have to fill it manually. Put a check valve in ahead of the float valve so the water line could not siphon, or be like an open valve in the house when the water pressure was down and the valve were open, due to a drop in water in the cistern.

 

I would then pipe the submersible pump into the water line. just behind the check valve.

 

Use all the other existing piping, out to the water meter, where I would cut it and add another check valve. 

 

But, thinking more about it now, I think I would have to kill the water line from the meter, so it did not interfere with the pump when pressure were high?. 

 

Alternatively, I could cut the water line and run it from the meter to the cistern direct. Just as I would an external tank. Let the float valve fill it when water pressure were high enough, and use the ol' pumperoo when we had any water pressure needs - like my ever necessary bum gun! 

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lopburi3

Was thinking about this last night after shutting down computer.  I use a boat sump pump bought on Ebay as emergency home sump in case of power outage (home drains blocked to prevent flash flood from roads drains).  As this is 12v DC battery operated and fully strong enough for good showers believe it might be something you could look into.  Pump was less than $20 but would need a battery and cheap charger unit.  This would be safe to use in bath and very small.  You could hook up to water of just use from a plastic hose/shower.  Please do not use a 230v sump pump as have had one short to case so would never trust them in home or without good electrics (ground fault protection).

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Paul

Rule was a very popular brand when I was a boy growing up on Tybee Island. In fact, we had them on our boats. Not sure how much pressure they would generate? Haven't really ever put much thought into using one, honestly. They were always high volume, to keep your watercraft from sinking. :)

 

Of course, in times of NO water pressure, beggars can't be choosers, I reckon. :D

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