Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
miles-high

Sailing fun...

Recommended Posts

miles-high

With over 7,000 islands, it would be more fun to buy a boat. Or that’s what I thought until I saw this YouTube video… I don’t know if I could survive these rough seas… :(

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLIzp3WLpQE

 

I would think it would be much worse during the typhoon???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

With over 7,000 islands, it would be more fun to buy a boat. Or that’s what I thought until I saw this YouTube video… I don’t know if I could survive these rough seas… :(

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLIzp3WLpQE

 

I would think it would be much worse during the typhoon???

Few places in the Philippines would ever get seas like that even during a typhoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeepney

That was taken of Cork coast, Ireland, Atlantic ocean.

While fishing there, there could be  a NORMAL swell of 10/15 meters,

nothing to stop fishing over, or enjoying a day out.

Was fishing off the Derry coast one time, like in the clip, was force 10, some got a bit seasick, so went into a bay, fishing for ray.

So much shelter here behind islands, and totally different sea current and swell.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shadow

I just this week was given a 17 foot wooden boat built by a friend. He is retired Coast Guard and this was made using the design they used often for CG skiffs. Needs some work but has a lot of potential, and I needed a new project anyway. Will post some pics later.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
miles-high

there could be  a NORMAL swell of 10/15 meters

 

I wonder if there is any correlation between the swell length and the boat length to safely passing through the waves??? I am not referring to those 100, 200+ meter ships but more “affordable” private boats of say 30’ to 60’ or so…

 

Steel better than FRP/GRP or wood? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeepney

This is a example of the boats used for deep sea angling, http://www.seabreezeanglingkinsale.com/about-angling-kinsale ,

as you can see it is not huge, about 40/50 feet, still quite often you go through the swell, looking up to rooftop house high to of the swell, or look down from that same rooftop.

Btw there is nothing dangerous about a swell, the breakers are the danger signs.

 

Edit info: The Sea Breeze III is a 38ft Aquastar built to the highest standards.

Edited by Dutchpiet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dragonladies.org

That's a Pilot boat, they take the Harbor Pilots out to meet incoming ships, or go out to pick up the Pilots that are on departing ships.    Pays well, but it isn't easy.

 

Here's a pilot boat in same area trying to pick up a pilot from an outbound ship.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
govoner

I wonder if there is any correlation between the swell length and the boat length to safely passing through the waves??? I am not referring to those 100, 200+ meter ships but more “affordable” private boats of say 30’ to 60’ or so…

 

Steel better than FRP/GRP or wood? :)

 

it would be the difference of a small cork bobbling around compared to a large cork ie not much

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Davaoeno

it would be the difference of a small cork bobbling around compared to a large cork ie not much

 

I wonder about that . It seems to me that the length of the vessel dealing with the swells would be akin to a long car vs a short car traversing a speed bump - the wheel base makes a big difference.  Just guessing tho !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jimone

An old friend of mine would say " any boat between 14 foot and 40 foot was useless " over 14 is hard to use in a creek and under 40 is to small to go out in the open ocean with ...... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill H

 

 

Steel better than FRP/GRP or wood? :)

 

Maybe, but it depends.  Pound for pound it is stronger, but strength is a relative term and it depends on what the use is.  All things considered though, I'd go with steel for building a boat if it were over 12m long.  Under that, and weights get out of hand and very thin steel, while strong, is difficult to fabricate without distortion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knowdafish

Maybe, but it depends.  Pound for pound it is stronger, but strength is a relative term and it depends on what the use is.  All things considered though, I'd go with steel for building a boat if it were over 12m long.  Under that, and weights get out of hand and very thin steel, while strong, is difficult to fabricate without distortion.

 

Aluminum hulled boats, though very expensive, save their added cost in fuel savings versus steel. At approx. 1/2 the weight of steel aluminum hulled boats don't have to plow through as much water since they don't draw as much draft. I think all materials have their suitability though when it comes to hull fabrication including kevlar/carbon fiber, aluminum, steel, fiberglass, wood. and even cement. Often it comes down to what the budget is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..