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What do you think of the Public Education here in the Philippines


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These posts are interesting and seemed to be well considered. However, what is the point?

 

I recall many instances in the forum of discussions very similar to this. In those cases, a member wanted some advice about making a choice....public or private schooling. In particular, the member lived in a specific area and needed advice.

 

The thread above is generic, and as I said, interesting. It just doesn't seem to provide useful advice. Just opinions about what is good or bad and how that compares to other educational systems.

 

I have opinions and experience with both the public and private school systems here. However, the experience is limited to where I live, which is a provincial area. If a member wanted some information about what schools are like in my area, I can share that. As well, I know of good and bad in other areas from the reports of other members or news media.

 

It just seems this is like discussing whether the Chinese should be exploring the moon or would their money be spent better on building a new dam somewhere.

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This topic has come up before and the question is asked, Can a child get a good education in the Philippines? My own son completed the curriculum at Caraga Regional Science High School which is a publ

Well stated. The quality of education all boils down to this...     This is also my opinion...     Except I believe there are two factors involved in this. Cheating is definitely a problem, It

Boy the pinoy -bashers seem to be having a field day. So if listening to them, if an expat comes here and has children then quickly move back to your host country, or you will be an irresponsible pare

wearing a uniform- skirts for girls are a plus, just sit down, use your skirt as a cover and pee away. that's how I remembered my growing up and going to school years. honestly.

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USMC-Retired

Again they did not ask about US education funny people will try and defend a position by saying how bad something else is. You can not even compare the two. The US is light years ahead and getting in the right school is the key. Which can be done very simply.

 

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Edited by USMC-Retired
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liquido

 

 

I can respect your decision to have your kids taught where ever you want. In my case I pulled my American born children out of American schools in a well to do Chicago suburb because of how bad those schools are and moved to the Philippines to get a better education for them. Yes, the schools were very pretty, and well maintained, but the education sucked! Lots of focus on all the PC topics of the day, but very little on reading, writing, math, science etc. No wonder many kids can't read or balance a check book when they graduate.
\

 

No way in hell would i take a child out of the USA thinking the  Philippines would provide a better education....How can you think a 3rd world country would offer a better education?

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Majorsco

 

No way in hell would i take a child out of the USA thinking the Philippines would provide a better education....How can you think a 3rd world country would offer a better education?

Simple. Look at the curriculum here, look at how it's taught. Look at the results. That's the bottom line. Pretty schools, highly paid teachers that just pass students on, and a common core curriculum that says 2+2=5 is ok doesn't cut it.

 

Having lived here and monitored the school I send my kids along with the public school my nephews and nieces attends is far superior to the American school I took my kids out if.

 

Even a third world country can provide a good education. I guess it takes an open mind to consider the possibility that American schools don't gave all the answers. Throwing money at a problem and getting no change of result is not a solution.

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JamesMusslewhite

Boy the pinoy -bashers seem to be having a field day. So if listening to them, if an expat comes here and has children then quickly move back to your host country, or you will be an irresponsible parents and your kids will be stupid. Parents can not possibly research the schools, put their kids in high performing schools, be active in the PTA, assist them with their studies to insure they are getting the best education possible. What horrible parents we must be,

 

Then again the facts show that the United States has fallen to "average" in international education rankings released by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, according to the AFP. America has received scores around 500 on a scale that goes up to 1,000: 487 in math, 500 in reading and 502 in science. The three-yearly OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, which compares the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds in 70 countries around the world, ranked the United States 14th out of 34 OECD countries for reading skills, 17th for science and a below-average 25th for mathematics.

 

I know that in the 4 years he attended High School here there was not one teen pregnancy or drug overdose in his school or teen gang related incident. He and his fellow students were actually taught to had respected for both their teachers and their elders, and never once was he ever frisked before entering into his school building, made to pass through metal detectors, or had drug dogs checking his or any other student's lockers. He also was not forced to have to adhere and conform to politically correct feminized socialist indoctrination by federal mandates, But despite missing those US school activities and lessons he did still somehow learned enough to be excepted to Universities that ranked well above the 10% rankings of Universities world wide.

 

Perhaps I am just a really irresponsibly bad parent of a poorly educated and socially inept child? Or perhaps members here just need to seriously take all the negative rhetoric with a huge grain of salt? :biggrin_01:

Edited by JamesMusslewhite
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USMC-Retired

There is a reason they are third world and the primary reason is education. Comparing a country that has fallen from #1 in recent years to a country that fails to reach even the bottom rung is uncomparable. Public education for anyone considering a move to the Philippines should reconsider that move. There is no denying it is behind westernized societies. Your children will need a private school education in the Philippines. Then its still buyer beware as diploma mills run rampant with schools not certified by Philippine Deped.

 

Yes I think it is irresponsible of a parent if given a choice in education or can afford private education for your children. Then you choose Philippine public education. If you have no choice then you must work with the hand thats dealt.

 

Sent from my GT-P6200 using Tapatalk

 

Edited by USMC-Retired
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cebubird

Boy the pinoy -bashers seem to be having a field day. So if listening to them, if an expat comes here and has children then quickly move back to your host country, or you will be an irresponsible parents and your kids will be stupid. Parents can not possibly research the schools, put their kids in high performing schools, be active in the PTA, assist them with their studies to insure they are getting the best education possible. What horrible parents we must be,

 

Then again the facts show that the United States has fallen to "average" in international education rankings released by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, according to the AFP. America has received scores around 500 on a scale that goes up to 1,000: 487 in math, 500 in reading and 502 in science. The three-yearly OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, which compares the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds in 70 countries around the world, ranked the United States 14th out of 34 OECD countries for reading skills, 17th for science and a below-average 25th for mathematics.

 

I know that in the 4 years he attended High School here there was not one teen pregnancy or drug overdose in his school or teen gang related incident. He and his fellow students were actually taught to had respected for both their teachers and their elders, and never once was he ever frisked before entering into his school building, made to pass through metal detectors, or had drug dogs checking his or any other student's lockers. He also was not forced to have to adhere and conform to politically correct feminized socialist indoctrination by federal mandates, But despite missing those US school activities and lessons he did still somehow learned enough to be excepted to Universities that ranked well above the 10% rankings of Universities world wide.

 

Perhaps I am just a really irresponsibly bad parent of a poorly educated and socially inept child? Or perhaps members here just need to seriously take all the negative rhetoric with a huge grain of salt? :biggrin_01:

 

 

 

Some excellent points James-   but while he was not subjected to all those things, guess he was forcefed catholic doctrine, as that seems to be prevalent in all the public schools.

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SkyMan

I don't have any school aged kids any more (yet) but I still have some thoughts on what I've seen here regarding public schools. 

 

Locally:

 

The schools are underfunded and oversight is lacking.  This is common the world over though, just more so here.

Some teachers are apparently hired because their relative is 'someone.'

Underpaid teachers are often required to pay a fee to whoever it is that controls their employment.

Dancing, Singing, and Beauty Pageants take precedence over learning useful stuff.

 

Globally:

 

Children's education starts and ends with the parents.  If it's important to you then you will find a way to make it important to your children.  And if they are motivated to learn, they will.  If not, the school doesn't matter at all.  If you are actively involved they will do well.  I don't think James sent his son off and then praised/demeaned the school based on his son's performance.  Parents need to pick up where the schools leave off which may be quite a bit.  My advice to parents here is to send the kids to whatever school you want (public or private) and can afford but also home school at the western level in the important subjects which for me would be Math, Science, and English.  Your list may be different.  If the school is up to par on those the kid will just follow along, piece of cake.  If not, you need to fill in the gaps and school will be a piece of cake.  Do not assume a school, any school, is a machine you put a young kid in and out pops a smart one.

 

Class size.  I personally feel 20-25 is about the best maximum size but I have a friend who is a career ESL teacher who claims many studies have been done on this and the results don't bare that out.  I don't have the interest to research that so if someone else wants to look that up, consider it a class project.

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JamesMusslewhite

Some excellent points James-   but while he was not subjected to all those things, guess he was forcefed catholic doctrine, as that seems to be prevalent in all the public schools.

None that I was ever aware of. I guess his teachers were just too busy teaching him calculus, trigonometry, physics and analytical chemistry.

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Majorsco
Some teachers are apparently hired because their relative is 'someone.'

 

In some cases that is true.  Here in my barangay, my wife's great grandfather donated the land the elementary school sits on  with the stipulation, that any member of my wife's family who is licensed to teach will be able to get a job at that school.  They still have to be fully qualified and licensed but they do get that advantage. 

 

 

 

Dancing, Singing, and Beauty Pageants take precedence over learning useful stuff.

 

The Philippines is the land of beauty pagents.  Why wouldn't that extend into the schools, it is as much a national past time for women as basketball or boxing for men.

 

As to the singing and dancing, I don't see anything wrong with the arts being taught in school.  Most, if not all countries, teach the arts, whether it be band, or something else.

 

These are not done at the expense of learning the normal curriculum.  It supplements.

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Once in a while there is a thread like this with the back and forth views of members. Always seems to me it comes to a draw as to favorable versus unfavorable views.

 

One thing I want to add about the so-called "arts" being taught in school. In the schools my children attend, the "arts" are there if you want to stretch the truth. For example, my daughter is spending another Saturday practicing for an upcoming cotillion. She has already spent around five full days practicing for this event. She will learn a few dances and as a group, the couples will perform for the parents. The next time any of them will see these dances is when they put their own children through the same process.

 

This is not learning native dance, ballet, modern dance, cheer dance or anything else which may help them develop an understanding of performing arts. Nope. This is just a performance for the parents to watch.

 

My son is in "band". Not sure I would call it that except here. There was one choice for the boys in the band. Drums. Snare, bass, whatever. Only drums. They don't really get lessons. One of the high school "band" members comes in the early part of the school year and gets the boys organized and they can barely keep a beat as the three parades they have each year are performed. All of this takes place in the first two months of the year and then it is over.

 

As to other "arts", my children have had the same soap carving "art" project each year from K1 till now.

 

My point is there is no real "arts" being taught in the private school my kids go to. However, you'd never know that if you asked any of the parents. "My child is in band. I'm so proud!"

 

I am fully aware that some members have children in schools where there is far greater emphasis on true "arts". Just wanted to pint out that it is not a nation-wide effort.

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Davaoeno

My gf has been a teacher at the largest public school in Davao for 18 years.   Apparently her school never wins any of the organized contests against other schools ie plays, dancing etc  because at her school the teachers are forbidden to use any class time for such activities. 

 

Her take on my complaints about the low level of education in schools here. She says that in Luzon the kids only have to contend with tagalog and English, and that in the Visayas the people tend to be proud of their Cebuano heritage and concentrate in school on Cebuano/Bisayan and English- and pay much less attention to tagalog .   . . However in Mindanao the kids have to contend with tagalog, english and bisayan - which ends up in many of them not understanding class room instructions [ since  classes are in english but at home the parents  mostly only speak visayan ]   . Of course that is a generalization .  I also see old old text books, or regurgitated photo copied materials from years past.  And that even at the college level .

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My gf has been a teacher at the largest public school in Davao for 18 years.   Apparently her school never wins any of the organized contests against other schools ie plays, dancing etc  because at her school the teachers are forbidden to use any class time for such activities. 

 

Her take on my complaints about the low level of education in schools here. She says that in Luzon the kids only have to contend with tagalog and English, and that in the Visayas the people tend to be proud of their Cebuano heritage and concentrate in school on Cebuano/Bisayan and English- and pay much less attention to tagalog .   . . However in Mindanao the kids have to contend with tagalog, english and bisayan - which ends up in many of them not understanding class room instructions [ since  classes are in english but at home the parents  mostly only speak visayan ]   . Of course that is a generalization .  I also see old old text books, or regurgitated photo copied materials from years past.  And that even at the college level .

I believe your girlfriend is onto something with the language issues being a problem. My children speak Visayan as well as English. They regularly fail exams in Tagalog. In fact, most of the kids do. This is in spite of efforts on our part to help them learn. I might as well be teaching them Latin for all it's worth.

 

There's no teaching the Visayan language. It is just the most common language spoken.

 

As to using English in class and in lessons, it is pretty pathetic. Yes, english is used, but used so badly that makes it hard for me to help since I use English but can't teach it very well

 

I was interested in the comment about using old lessons. A few years ago, before I had an Internet connection at home, it was common for the kids to come home with an assignment to "research" a subject, but have no textbook covering the topic. The teacher really meant "find a Wikipedia article". In the beginning, it would piss me off a lot. Now we have an Internet connection at home and have the ability to "research" just about anything. I have given up trying to influence the teachers.

 

The use of older and regurgitated material is very common here. Even at the elementary school level, when the teacher does give any sort of useful handout, it is really just a copy of a wiki article they used as an undergraduate. In the past, the teachers would give a lesson on some subject, the kids took notes as best they could. Then,the teacher would give a "handout" to be used. Here's the way that worked. One student would get a badly reproduced copy of some crap the teacher had used in college and give it to a brown noser in the class. Then, each kid had to scramble to get a copy made, sometimes taking a couple of days before the "handout" was in their hands.

 

Some teachers would improvise this by putting the stuff on a flash drive. Now, the truly creative ones simply post the crap on Facebook and expect the students to "friend" the teacher and collect the handout.

 

Even the stuff my children got in elementary school was never written for their age. The text books would have the same crap every year and written with verbiage totally unfamiliar to the kids. Sometimes it was oddly amusing to look over our kids exams. We'd have three children in three different grades but the exam questions were exactly the same. So my child in grade six was taking the same exam my child in grade four was taking.

 

I'm not particularly concerned about this any more. My wife and I make sure the kids learn the subjects, get the grades they need to need to get and we move along. I realized after a few years I was not going to achieve any success in improving the way the kids were taught.

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Salty Dog

Boy the pinoy -bashers seem to be having a field day. So if listening to them, if an expat comes here and has children then quickly move back to your host country, or you will be an irresponsible parents and your kids will be stupid. Parents can not possibly research the schools, put their kids in high performing schools, be active in the PTA, assist them with their studies to insure they are getting the best education possible. What horrible parents we must be,

 

Then again the facts show that the United States has fallen to "average" in international education rankings released by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, according to the AFP. America has received scores around 500 on a scale that goes up to 1,000: 487 in math, 500 in reading and 502 in science. The three-yearly OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, which compares the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds in 70 countries around the world, ranked the United States 14th out of 34 OECD countries for reading skills, 17th for science and a below-average 25th for mathematics.

 

I know that in the 4 years he attended High School here there was not one teen pregnancy or drug overdose in his school or teen gang related incident. He and his fellow students were actually taught to had respected for both their teachers and their elders, and never once was he ever frisked before entering into his school building, made to pass through metal detectors, or had drug dogs checking his or any other student's lockers. He also was not forced to have to adhere and conform to politically correct feminized socialist indoctrination by federal mandates, But despite missing those US school activities and lessons he did still somehow learned enough to be excepted to Universities that ranked well above the 10% rankings of Universities world wide.

 

Perhaps I am just a really irresponsibly bad parent of a poorly educated and socially inept child? Or perhaps members here just need to seriously take all the negative rhetoric with a huge grain of salt? :biggrin_01:

 

So why did you send your son to the United States to attend a University, instead of one here in the Philippines?  :unknw:

Edited by Salty Dog
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