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What do you think of the Public Education here in the Philippines


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Majorsco

 

 

and their children are actually willing to properly apply themselves in their studies.

 

And parents need to provide the home environment supporting schoolwork, and also to help make sure that the kids do their homework and help them when they need help.  That would be the same anywhere, US and Philippines.  Kids without parental involvement don't usually do as well and don't consider school a priority.

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This topic has come up before and the question is asked, Can a child get a good education in the Philippines? My own son completed the curriculum at Caraga Regional Science High School which is a publ

Well stated. The quality of education all boils down to this...     This is also my opinion...     Except I believe there are two factors involved in this. Cheating is definitely a problem, It

Boy the pinoy -bashers seem to be having a field day. So if listening to them, if an expat comes here and has children then quickly move back to your host country, or you will be an irresponsible pare

our eldest just sat his pre kinder assessment for La salle.  They quite clearly wanted to see if he would be ok without us and follow his teacher etc. we asked what he did in the assessment as we were not allowed in he just said my numbers and letters i asked what numbers he said up to 10. I was surprised as he is already comfortable up to 100 

 

I will be taking a very keen interest in their expectations and Syllabus. I will be looking for Language exposure outside of Tagalog and English, hope Spanish and one other

 

the little lady is a drummer in the music class for 18  month olds and beats a beat to her own marching band :yahoo:

Edited by spooks
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Pre-school to 2nd year HS is what I’m asking about. What thoughts would you like to share with me and others?

 

Having looked at some of the better private schools, I would never send a kid to public schools for elementary 1-6. 

Even at the private schools, such as the one our daughter attends, the teacher's written English and pronunciation is

substandard.  I can only imagine what it's like in public school.

 

Couple that with class size at 50-60 which is a horrifying teacher - student ratio, I cannot imagine learning much. 

 

I do believe that if a student is extremely motivated, they'll learn regardless of the situation, but they must be focused on

learning and in classes that size focus is difficult. 

 

I wouldn't risk my child's future on public schools here just as I didn't have my US children in public schools.  Makes no sense

when there are viable alternatives.

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Majorsco

Having looked at some of the better private schools, I would never send a kid to public schools for elementary 1-6.

Even at the private schools, such as the one our daughter attends, the teacher's written English and pronunciation is

substandard. I can only imagine what it's like in public school.

 

Couple that with class size at 50-60 which is a horrifying teacher - student ratio, I cannot imagine learning much.

 

I do believe that if a student is extremely motivated, they'll learn regardless of the situation, but they must be focused on

learning and in classes that size focus is difficult.

 

I wouldn't risk my child's future on public schools here just as I didn't have my US children in public schools. Makes no sense

when there are viable alternatives.

That's a very generalized statement when each school and school district is different.

 

My kids attend private school in Dapitan and their class size is less than 30. In fact my son's class was over 40 and as a result they have two sections of his class to keep the class size under 30.

 

In terms if public schools, my house backs up to the elementary school in my barangay and I can attest that there aren't even 20-25 kids per grade.

 

It's difficult to analyze the school quality if the Philippines when one example is way above normal and others are below. It is N unfair indictment of the schools based on one school, or even a few schools, to say they are overcrowded.

 

It's not that simple.

 

 

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USMC-Retired

Over crowding, lack of books, lack of desks, high teacher to student ratio, are the norms for Philippine Public Education not the exception. Do not try and kid yourself into thinking otherwise. Good education in the Philippines is attached with a Peso symbol. Your hard work and effort will determine how much and how they learn. Education in general in the Philippines is several rungs below western standard education. Just based on rankings, testing, and other factors. It is a third world country with third world issues. Education is first among that list.

 

Sent from my GT-P6200 using Tapatalk

 

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Majorsco

Over crowding, lack of books, lack of desks, high teacher to student ratio, are the norms for Philippine Public Education not the exception. Do not try and kid yourself into thinking otherwise. Good education in the Philippines is attached with a Peso symbol. Your hard work and effort will determine how much and how they learn. Education in general in the Philippines is several rungs below western standard education. Just based on rankings, testing, and other factors. It is a third world country with third world issues. Education is first among that list. Sent from my GT-P6200 using Tapatalk

More generalizations that don't wash across the board.

 

I pulled my daughter out if a suburban Chicago school district that was highly rated because it was not focused on read, writing and math.

 

My daughter and my younger son are now ahead of their American counterparts as a result.

 

Yes, the Philippines is a third world country, but they focus on education more than other govt aspects. In the US, education is low on the scale plus they focus in those topics that are not as important as reZding, writing, and math.

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USMC-Retired

No it is not generalization. Every single year teachers, students complain about this. Lack of funding and lack of essentials is very very common. To believe your kids will be better in a Philippine Public school then a US public school is ignorant. Standardize tests and follow on education prove me out. I have been to many public schools in my 6+ years I lived there, it is appauling. There are options for a good education, however a peso symbol is attached. Though again your money seems to buy less there then equally in a western country.

 

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Wonderful news about a new 12 year school system going into effect!

 

don't get too excited about it.  they are in a transition period on the way to make it a 13 year system.  kindergarten, 7 years of elementary, 4 years junior high, and 2 years senior high.  there is also a rather confused debate about switching the timing of the school year, having it start in august/september, end in may/june.  some universities are making the switch this coming year.

 

edit:  see:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_the_Philippines#Chinese_schools

look for the red and green chart toward the middle

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Majorsco

No it is not generalization. Every single year teachers, students complain about this. Lack of funding and lack of essentials is very very common. To believe your kids will be better in a Philippine Public school then a US public school is ignorant. Standardize tests and follow on education prove me out. I have been to many public schools in my 6+ years I lived there, it is appauling. There are options for a good education, however a peso symbol is attached. Though again your money seems to buy less there then equally in a western country. Sent from my GT-P6200 using Tapatalk

So I'm ignorant with a masters degree in education!

 

Your assessment, without backup, is based on observation if how many school? All of them????

 

My point is that some schools are challenged and some are not. To lump 100% if schools into that challenged lot IS ignorant!!!!!!!

 

Each school and school district is different and needs to be assessed as such. I know of no nation wide studies in the subject in the Philippines.

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Majorsco

don't get too excited about it. they are in a transition period on the way to make it a 13 year system. kindergarten, 7 years of elementary, 4 years junior high, and 2 years senior high. there is also a rather confused debate about switching the timing of the school year, having it start in august/september, end in may/june. some universities are making the switch this coming year.

 

edit: see:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_the_Philippines#Chinese_schools

look for the red and green chart toward the middle

Don't get the switching of school year ting out of context. That was by about half a dozen universities so they can attract foreign students. It was not a broad push for change.

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Don't get the switching of school year ting out of context. That was by about half a dozen universities so they can attract foreign students. It was not a broad push for change.

 

but there has always been a bit of a push in that direction to cut down on days lost due to typhoons.  deped has been giving more attention to the idea now that the universities are making the switch.  interesting that up diliman, that sort of initiated the change, has now rejected (subject to up system president's final decision i think) making the change even though several other up systems have committed to change.

 

i hope they don't do it.  holding classes in the hot summer months makes no sense.

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USMC-Retired

284 dollars per student per year is spent on public education in the Philippines. That includes books, facilities, salaries and everything. In contrast the US spends 1.5X GDP of the Philippines on education. It is third world and yes a blind squirel can find a nut but not very often. I am not going to base my childrens future on finding a nut. He asked how public education is in the Philippines and the answer is horrible. General answer for a general question.

 

Sent from my GT-P6200 using Tapatalk

 

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Majorsco

284 dollars per student per year is spent on public education in the Philippines. That includes books, facilities, salaries and everything. In contrast the US spends 1.5X GDP of the Philippines on education. It is third world and yes a blind squirel can find a nut but not very often. I am not going to base my childrens future on finding a nut. He asked how public education is in the Philippines and the answer is horrible. General answer for a general question. Sent from my GT-P6200 using Tapatalk

The American answer is to throw money at a problem, and the more money the faster the problem will go away. A crock of sh..

 

America has pretty new schools, all wired for high tech and many kids can't read. Many highly paid teachers are union protected paperweights in those classes. Yes, I said highly paid. In the Chicago school district high tenure teachers are paid upwards of 75-100k. It's public record. They have a website and I could look up teachers by name .

 

Now there are a lit of other school districts that are paying less, but amazingly they are getting good results.

 

The teachers in the public elementary school behind my house are paid between 10k and 14k per month. It's posted on the wall behind the principals desk. Here in Dapitan that is a good salary. Yes the bldg is old and needs maint and the kids share books, but look at the results.

 

The kids can read, write, do math and learn three languages. Yes they could use more money but it's what the do with what they have that makes the difference. And no teachers unions sucking the blood out of good teachers and protecting the bad ones.

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USMC-Retired

284 Dollars per year per student including Books, Facilities, teacher salaries, and everything. You are welcome to draw your own conclusions as to the state of public education in the Philippines. The US education system has no bearing on that.

 

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Majorsco

284 Dollars per year per student including Books, Facilities, teacher salaries, and everything. You are welcome to draw your own conclusions as to the state of public education in the Philippines. The US education system has no bearing on that.

 

Sent from my GT-P6200 using Tapatalk

 

 

So the results of the schools here are ignored in your post.  You're focused on spending more money.  Quite an American approach to any problem, speaking as an American.

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