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Paul

Reclaiming Grey Water

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Paul

Not only harvesting rain water but also reading up a bit on re-using Grey water (shower & sinks). Once filtered can be great water supply to a small farm.

 

Excellent idea. Personally, I would want to use it to help keep a small pond filled during dry season, when there is little to no rain here. 

 

During January, we received NO rain whatsoever, here in Battambang, not 1mm. 

 

So, what sort of filtering would it need before being routed to a pond? 

 

Anyone?

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CardiacKid

IF you plan to use it for irrigation for food crops, be cautious. My wife dumped the contents of the kitchen sink onto some okra she had growing outside. The result was soap flavored okra. 

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Enuff

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Enuff

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Enuff

Originally my thought was to use sink & shower water for the toilet, instead of musing "good" water to piss in.

 

Upon more research I found numerous people re-using all grey water (sinks, shower & washer).

 

I cant find the original video, but one guy was using a standard pool filter and adding slight amounts of vinegar to replace some of the acidic balance.

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Tinbum

Coming from rural France, i have some experience in both living with, maintaining, and installing "off grid" sewage systems. These are commonly known as a fosse septique (septic tank.)

 

Regulations recently changed in France in that  all systems had to be a Tout l' eau system as opposed to the original toilet only systems. Tout l' eau meaning all water, grey included. Our Mill had a pipe from the toilet going to the septic tank, and a separate grey side that just discharged out of a bank onto the ground.

 

The basic design concept now is  that all grey water leaves the property together in one pipe and initially passes through a grease trap. This is a 500mm cube pit filled with a charcoal like substance. The grease adheres to the surface of the pieces and the water passes on and joins the dirty water in the septic tank. This joining to the dirty water could be bypassed in a grey water only system. The charcoal elements are changed every 3 - 4 years depending on grease build up.

 

The water then enters a sand filter bed, passing through various layers, perforated pipework, geo-textile, and emerging out the other side. The size of the sand filter is determined by the occupancy of the property.( Std house of 3 bedrooms requires a tank of 3000 litres and a 20 sq m filter bed.)

The water leaving the filter bed is of such an acceptable standard, that it by law, can be discharged into rivers/streams etc.

Basic schematic......  

 

layout.jpg

 

Another even greener system that exists in Northern France is a tiered 3 pond system. Certain reed and grass types are used in the differing pond tiers to filter out differing toxins etc. Again, the water exiting the last pond is capable of being used or discharged into natural watercourses.

Edited by Paul
changed link to image.
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Paul

 

 

The result was soap flavored okra. 

 

Growing up in Savannah, we had a drain from the washing machine that went under the house, and came out where three fig trees were planted. My father never put any sort of fertilizer of any kind on them, or did anything else to them for that matter - with the exception of letting 100% of the washing machine water drain under those trees. They ALWAYS produced the largest, juiciest figs ever. I always looked forward to "fig season", when my momma would prepare regular and strawberry fig preserves. God, how I miss those days as a boy.


 

I will check these out. 

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RogerDat

Growing up in Savannah, we had a drain from the washing machine that went under the house, and came out where three fig trees were planted. My father never put any sort of fertilizer of any kind on them, or did anything else to them for that matter - with the exception of letting 100% of the washing machine water drain under those trees. They ALWAYS produced the largest, juiciest figs ever. I always looked forward to "fig season", when my momma would prepare regular and strawberry fig preserves. God, how I miss those days as a boy.

 

I will check these out. 

Greetings! Our soap powders in SC was full of phosphates back in the day before EPA regulations forbidding it.

We have a greese trap for all the wash, sink, and shower water, only the toilets going to the septic on two houses. It then goes to a cement lagoon with water Hiacynt that takes most neutrents that cause green algy bloom out of it. The frogs and catfish control wigglers. The first one has been working over 3 years now. No black mud, and very little stink unless right beside it. ALL kitchen sinks have food filters in the drain, and scraps go to compost pile,

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Paul

This has turned out to be a pretty good thread. Thanks bigmook for being the reason it was started.

 

I have to say, before, I was going to route the grey water to the septic tank, or to another separate tank in the ground. But, bigmoot made that post and gave me the idea to help keep the pond water level up during dry season (not even 1mm of rain last month, here). Now, if I can build a filter that will put clean enough water back in the pond, we will be ahead of the game. 

Edited by Paul

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BoholoX

Another even greener system that exists in Northern France is a tiered 3 pond system. Certain reed and grass types are used in the differing pond tiers to filter out differing toxins etc. Again, the water exiting the last pond is capable of being used or discharged into natural watercourses.

On one of my infrequent visits to Dumaguete didn't I see this in action just off the main road near the church? Reed beds with some signs from the university explaining the system of waste filtration? I was drunk most of the time though so may have dreamt it or another city completely.

Edited by Paul
fixed quoted text?
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Knowdafish

 

 

On one of my infrequent visits to Dumaguete didn't I see this in action just off the main road near the church?

 

Yes, you did see it in Dumaguete in the park across from the old Catholic church. 

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Paul

That sounds like what I need to do, in order to put our grey water into the pond, to help keep the water level higher during dry season.

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