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tambok

Unmentioned Annoyances of Being Able to Speak Filipino Languages

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SomeRandomGuy

man if u live here and have a a partner that speaks a language then u learn it. If your wife does not want u to learn it, I personally would learn it even more but in secret so u know what is being said.

I remember living next door a now passed away expat and his wife told my gf at the time not to teach me any cebuano as we learn to much and they can never keep any secrets from us.

She then said to her why are u teaching him in which she replied I don't he spoke it  before i met him. She then asked me why i wanted to learn cebuano which i replied ( and keep in mind i did not like this woman)" so i don't end up with a money hungry devious bitch like u" which i  spoke in perfect english as I did not want the meaning lost in translation.

All the gfs and wives of my friends that are what I would call sneaky and no good all tell their bf's or husbands they do not want them to learn the dialect. feck that it's not hard. Pick a word or two a day and then once u have a few under your belt learn sentences and syntax.

Before u know it U will be as pissed off as I am when u hear things about your woman or that u have money so u can afford more being said right in front of u.

 

My favorite was my friends gf talking to my partner about all the men she had been with and how us foreigners have to give them money as we feck with them.

Or my friends wife talking to her friend about this pinoy that is very handsome that she is entertaining when he is out and about, right in front of him when we were having beers.

None of my business though.

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Contango

I spoke Tagalog in public for the first time on friday night, told the jeep driver to stop, the 2 locals sitting closest both giggled.

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smidsy

Interesting topic !

 

As sated above, there's positives & negatives, but overall imo the positives out weigh the negatives !

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CebuJohn

I spoke Tagalog in public for the first time on friday night, told the jeep driver to stop, the 2 locals sitting closest both giggled.

I love Jeepney Tagalog, if the jeepney route is fixed.  In Angeles City, for example, I take a few jeepneys that go from point A to point B, so there is never any reason to ask anyone else where they want to go if you are passing along their money to the driver.  So on easy routes, i always sit right up as close to the driver as I can, this affords me many opportunities to be the one to speak Tagalog to both those handing me money and then to the driver. 

The simplest thing I get to say is "Bayed po daw" if I haven't yet paid, but I'm passing along someone else's money.

If I've already paid, I don't have to say "daw" anymore, the driver already understands that I speak for someone else.

If a person hands more money than a fare for one, I can ask "Ilan po?"  (How many fares are you paying?) .

I then get to say the same thing to the driver as I pass the money (Bayed po dalawa for two fares, for example, or bayed po isa lang for one fare only).

Sometimes I hear Kapampangan words for one and two , "metong" or "adua" , I get to repeat these to the driver.

If someone way at the back says "Para po" but the driver does not seem to have heard, I get the chance to say "Para po daw", the jeepney driver understands right away and stops.

For me, being an Anglo in Angeles with little to no Tagalog skills, jeepney Tagalog is alot of fun and a great confidence builder. 

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SomeRandomGuy

I spoke Tagalog in public for the first time on friday night, told the jeep driver to stop, the 2 locals sitting closest both giggled.

don't get disgruntled over the laughter or giggles. If u watch tv here apparently it is local humor to make fun of people that say things slightly wrong.

 

I have been told when I am learning new words that I sounds like a child ( I am still learning words and phrases and how to say them correctly all the time) and they laugh a lot. My friggin fiance is the worst for it as she cracks up when i say things slightly wrong but that as i say is just local humor the think it is hilarious.

I learnt a mix of tagalog and bisaya when I was first learning as I was living in davao at the time and they speak a mix. Today I was learning the word for pangit ( ugly) in bisay which batig nawng ( spelling may vary) and she was laughing for a full ten minutes before I could get the Nawng part right and it only took that bloody long as I could not get her to say it broken down to BA TIG NAW NG so I could learn how to pronounce it correctly as she was laughing that hard.

Frustrating as it was when i hear a word I do not know I want to learn it and how to say it correctly.

 

I people can laugh as much as they want but why let it bother u or get u down. My care factor for other people and what they think is at an all time high of about zero. And yours should be too.

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tambok

Also, I wouldn't generalize the whole of Asia. In Indonesia, which still has the easiest Asian language to learn, any little word you say will bring you further anywhere. Mistakes are gladly overlooked and if you can hold just a little bit of conversation, it opens you doors that would otherwise remain shut. That's the same for Bali, Jakarta or the smallest kampung on some remote island. Yes, they still have their local languages and dialects, but it seems Bahasa Indonesia has a greater uniting effect there than Tagalog or Filipino has here. Sent from my LG G2 using Tapatalk

Oh, Indonesia is indeed different. They speak to foreigners in Bahasa, the way it should be.

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Monsoon

I speak pretty fluent Tagalog and have never experienced hostility like you mention. Sometimes people are shocked when they learn my breadth of the language goes pretty deep including obscure slang and proper inflection and pronunciation. I receive compliments but never has anyone been rude to me for knowing the language. 

 

My experience overall has been quite the opposite: respect and admiration. 

 

My domestic employees speak to me in Tagalog, service people I interact with do. 

Edited by Monsoon
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tambok

I speak pretty fluent Tagalog and have never experienced hostility like you mention. Sometimes people are shocked when they learn my breadth of the language goes pretty deep including obscure slang and proper inflection and pronunciation. I receive compliments but never has anyone been rude to me for knowing the language. 

 

My experience overall has been quite the opposite: respect and admiration. 

 

My domestic employees speak to me in Tagalog, service people I interact with do. 

It is way less so in Tagalog than in Visaya. I almost never got mocked by Tagalogs or by Kapampangans who speak it. They act normal with me. But I got hostile reactions from Filipino Americans who "become" patriotic Filipinos after getting a US passport ( while Filipinos in the Philippines are patriotic Americans with USA T shirts- lol) . Again , all experiences are anecdotal and luck- dependant. Just like going to a war. Some people get shot at and killed and some go through it with no incident.

Tagalog is a lingua franca that unites so many people and is used as an inter-ethnic tongue. Tagalogs also demand that other Filipinos speak it when in Manila plus for the whole country to speak it.  Visaya may be seen as a proprietory language of an ethnic group and not a unifying one.

Add to it the factor of a white man's arrogance- "I am an Ameeeeeeeeeeeeeeerican! Talk English to me!" and his stubborn century old refusal to learn local languages and the fact that Filipinos have learned that a white man speaking Visaya is about as unnatural as a cat barking and you get bad reaction occasionally.

Edited by tambok

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ThomsonJr

Its a bit common in Thailand also, mostly outside of the capital in the more provincial areas. Some people, especially middle age and older people, dont want someone who doesnt look Thai to speak Thai, because they think the language should only be spoken and understood by Thai people. It's common among isolated communities.

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Paul

 

 

It is way less so in Tagalog than in Visaya. I almost never got mocked by Tagalogs or by Kapampangans who speak it.

 

Brother, now I REALLY have a hard time believing this. Let me tell you a little story, something that happened to me, prior to my moving to the Philippines in the early 2,000s. 

 

I was online, learning about the people, becoming friends with Filipinos online. This was long before Facebook or Twitter going online. This was during the days of Yahoo Groups popularity, where one would meet "friends" online. We still communicated via email or Yahoo Instant Messenger, back then. 

 

Anyway, during conversations with Filipinos, I would always get around to asking them about where I should live in the Philippines. (I had thought of Cebu, since it was the first place I had ever visited in the Philippines, back in the very early '90s. But, I was still open to living most anywhere. I was quite ignorant about the country, back then.) For me, though, to decide where, I figured I would express an interest in another part of the country, to people who lived far away from there. To those in the middle or southern parts of the Philippines, I would express interest in living in the north. To those in the north, I would express an interest in living in the middle or southern parts of the Philippines.

 

Every single Filipino from the Visayas or Mindanao regions of the Philippines, when I suggested what they thought of me living in Manila, would say things like, "You do not want to live there. Manila is very crowded. It is very dirty there because of pollution." That was a reasonable answer for me, I think. However, much different replies, when I queried my friends from the north.

 

When I would ask someone in the north, mostly from the Metro Manila Area, regarding living in say, Cebu. They would say, "You should not live there. The people are no good." You see, they never mentioned anything about the cities, only the people. 

 

What I am getting at here is, there is an arrogance, a superiority over other Filipinos, concerning many - yes, I know, not all, Tagalogs in the north. 

 

During my years of living in Cebu, I personally experienced Filipino friends who would move from Cebu to Manila, perhaps for work, school, training, etc. I would see them a couple years later. Surprisingly, they had forgotten completely, how to speak Cebuano!! However, they certainly could speak Tagalog or English. :rolleyes:

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Wolfpack

Brother, now I REALLY have a hard time believing this. Let me tell you a little story, something that happened to me, prior to my moving to the Philippines in the early 2,000s. 

 

I was online, learning about the people, becoming friends with Filipinos online. This was long before Facebook or Twitter going online. This was during the days of Yahoo Groups popularity, where one would meet "friends" online. We still communicated via email or Yahoo Instant Messenger, back then. 

 

Anyway, during conversations with Filipinos, I would always get around to asking them about where I should live in the Philippines. (I had thought of Cebu, since it was the first place I had ever visited in the Philippines, back in the very early '90s. But, I was still open to living most anywhere. I was quite ignorant about the country, back then.) For me, though, to decide where, I figured I would express an interest in another part of the country, to people who lived far away from there. To those in the middle or southern parts of the Philippines, I would express interest in living in the north. To those in the north, I would express an interest in living in the middle or southern parts of the Philippines.

 

Every single Filipino from the Visayas or Mindanao regions of the Philippines, when I suggested what they thought of me living in Manila, would say things like, "You do not want to live there. Manila is very crowded. It is very dirty there because of pollution." That was a reasonable answer for me, I think. However, much different replies, when I queried my friends from the north.

 

When I would ask someone in the north, mostly from the Metro Manila Area, regarding living in say, Cebu. They would say, "You should not live there. The people are no good." You see, they never mentioned anything about the cities, only the people. 

 

What I am getting at here is, there is an arrogance, a superiority over other Filipinos, concerning many - yes, I know, not all, Tagalogs in the north. 

 

During my years of living in Cebu, I personally experienced Filipino friends who would move from Cebu to Manila, perhaps for work, school, training, etc. I would see them a couple years later. Surprisingly, they had forgotten completely, how to speak Cebuano!! However, they certainly could speak Tagalog or English. :rolleyes:

 

you have professional penmanship...you should be writing books about the Philippines...I bet you could land a best seller...no joke...

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Paul

Considering the O/P's tag in the subject, "Should you even study them?" Yes, you should. I think those who live where Cebuano is spoken, should learn Cebuano. If you live where Tagalog is spoken, you should learn Tagalog. Likewise, regarding Waray, Ilonggo, etc., etc.

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Monsoon

you have professional penmanship...

 

When have you seen his handwriting? 

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broden

When have you seen his handwriting? 

on the wall .. he's seen it on the wall

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Monsoon

Considering the O/P's tag in the subject, "Should you even study them?" Yes, you should. I think those who live where Cebuano is spoken, should learn Cebuano. If you live where Tagalog is spoken, you should learn Tagalog. Likewise, regarding Waray, Ilonggo, etc., etc.

 

If they are going to only live in one area then maybe. I still say learning Tagalog is more universal and practical. They understand it wherever you go here for the most part so you won't be limiting yourself to any single region. 

Edited by Monsoon

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